In Memoriam: Theodore V. Buttrey, Jr.

(Written by Sarah E. Cox, and shared with the SCS by Ofelia N. Salgado-Buttrey)

Theodore V. Buttrey, Jr.

29 December 1929 – 9 January 2018

Renowned educator, numismatist and classicist, Theodore V. (“Ted”) Buttrey, Jr., died on January 9, 2018, eleven days after his 88th birthday.  Born in Havre, Montana, as a child he attended the Peacock Military Academy in San Antonio, Texas, where he first encountered the coins of Mexico, a life-long interest.  His secondary education was at the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, after which he entered Princeton University, graduating magna cum laude in 1950 in Classics.  In the summer of 1952, he participated in the inaugural Summer Seminar in Numismatics conducted by the American Numismatic Society, an experience that may well have been pivotal in setting the later course of his career.  In 1953, still at Princeton, he completed his Ph.D. thesis on a numismatic subject, “Studies in the Coinage of Marc Anthony,” a chapter of which was condensed and published as “Thea Neotera on Coins of Antony and Cleopatra,” ANS Museum Notes 6 (1954), pp. 95-109.  There followed a Fulbright scholarship to study in Rome.

In 1954 Ted joined the faculty of Yale University, where he remained for a decade, first as an instructor and then as assistant professor in the Department of Classical Studies; he also served as curator of the numismatic collection and, from 1962 to 1964, as assistant professor in the Department of Medieval Studies.  In 1964 he moved to the University of Michigan, where he remained until his retirement in 1985, starting as associate professor of Greek and Latin and rising to full professor in 1968.  From 1969 to 1971 he also served as Director of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.  After retiring from Michigan he moved to the University of Cambridge, to become an Affiliated Lecturer in the Faculty of Classics of Clare Hall College, where he had previously been a Visiting Fellow and Resident Member.  In addition, from 1988 to 1991 he served as Keeper of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum, and from 2008 until his death held the post of Honorary Keeper of Coins.  Ted was a life member of the SCS (the APA at that time) and the AIA, as well as a member of the Royal Numismatic Society and the Société Française de Numismatique, and he received a host of awards and honors, including the Medal of the Royal Numismatic Society, the Huntington Medal of the ANS, the medal of the Norwegian Numismatic Society, and the Wolfgang Hahn Medal of the Institut für Numismatik und Geldgeschichte of Vienna University.

Ted’s publications, both books and articles, totaled well over 100.  Most were concerned with topics in numismatics, especially antiquity, where the broad span of his interests encompassed Athenian coins, Republican denarii, Flavian coins, the coinage of Pescennius Niger, and even calculating ancient coin production.  The modern era of numismatics also consumed much of his time, and a challenge to the authenticity of a collector’s gold bars of the Spanish-American southwest even got his name in the newspapers.  But he never forsook his devotion to Classics, as evidenced by his early article, “Accident and Design in Euripides’ Medea,” published in AJP in 1958, while he was at Yale, and to an even greater extent by the television programs he produced for Michigan Media on Homer, Greek drama and theatre, Herodotus, Suetonius, and other classical subjects.  As recently as 2015, in conversations at the International Numismatic Congress in Taormina, he discussed plans for a book on the role of fate in Oedipus Rex, arguing against the idea of unshakeable destiny.

While never thought of as one who suffered fools gladly, he was a charismatic teacher and approachable mentor, encouraging of younger scholars, as well as a witty and engaging raconteur.  He will be greatly missed, but he leaves an immense legacy for his students, colleagues, and family to cherish and spread.

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(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   


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CFP: 2019 SAGP Annual Meeting

November 16-17, 2019
Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA
 
Panel Proposal Deadline: May 1
Paper Abstract Deadline: June 1
Submit abstracts and proposals to apreus@binghamton.edu.

All participants must be members of the SAGP. To become a member, fill out the form linked to here and mail it to A. Preus, SAGP Philosophy, Binghamton University, 13902-6000. 

Paper Abstracts

We invite people to submit abstracts on any topic in ancient Greek philosophy, broadly construed. For example:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 04/02/2019 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.

On March 15, the Aquila Theatre, in collaboration with SCS and the Onassis Foundation USA, produced a staged reading at BAM of Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey. You can read more about the staged reading here.

Congratulations to Aquila on its recently announced NEH grant of $250,000 for The Warrior Chorus: An American Odyssey.  This program will train veterans and scholars in three regional centers across the US to lead audience forums, workshops, and reading groups connected with a staging of Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey.

Photo Credit: Odysseus (James Edward Becton) and Penelope (Karen Alvarado), photo by Dan Gorman, 2019, copyright Frago Media LLC

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Tue, 04/02/2019 - 11:20am by Helen Cullyer.
Call For Papers:
“Far from Godliness”: Pollution in the Ancient World
Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference
 
New York University
November 7-8, 2019

Keynotes: Andrej Petrovic (University of Virginia) and Hunter Gardner (University of South Carolina)

Pollution of many forms was a grave concern in the ancient world. In defining pollution, we take as our starting point Mary Douglas’ conception of pollution as a culturally defined phenomenon involving disorder, taboo, and the “improper” (Purity and Danger, 1966). However, while Douglas’ theoretical framework is a useful heuristic tool for instances of miasmic pollution, our conference is also concerned with the physical contamination of the environment through human activity, especially given its contemporary cultural relevance. Thus, we define pollution as any activity which corrupts or defiles on physical, moral, environmental, and even material levels.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/01/2019 - 3:22pm by Erik Shell.

With the generous support of the foundation Patrum Lumen Sustine (PLuS) the Department of Ancient Civilizations of the University of Basel and the Société Internationale des Amis de Cicéron (SIAC) are jointly organising the international conference

Cicero in Basel. Reception Histories from a Humanist City
Basel, 3–5 October 2019

The conference Cicero in Basel aims at charting the presence of the statesman, orator, and philosopher M. Tullius Cicero in the cultural history of Basel, the city located in the border region between Switzer­land, Germany and France. While the study of Classical receptions tends to focus on particular cultural forms and discourses, the scope of the planned conference is programmatically open. Cicero in Basel ex­plores a broad spectrum of engagements with Cicero through the ages: from the manuscript tradition of his works, to Humanist editions and commentaries, up to the political debates and con­tro­versies of today. In this, Cicero in Basel will assess Cicero’s impact on the formation of a specific idea of Humanism in Basel as well as Basel’s role in Cicero’s Nachleben.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/01/2019 - 9:18am by Erik Shell.
Feminism & Classics 2020: body/language
 
FemClas 2020, the eighth quadrennial conference of its kind, takes place on May 21–24, 2020, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the invitation of the Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy.  The conference theme is "body/language," broadly construed, and papers on all topics related to feminism, Classics, Philosophy, and related themes are welcome.
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/01/2019 - 8:33am by Erik Shell.

The deadline for submission of the following is 11.59pm EDT, April 8:

  • Panel, seminar, workshop, and roundtable proposals for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Affiliated group and organizer-refereed panel reports for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Applications for renewed or new charters for affiliated groups
  • Applications for organizer-refereed panels for the 2021 Annual Meeting

The deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, April 15.

Please submit everything via our online Program Submission System.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 03/31/2019 - 6:05pm by Helen Cullyer.
ISAW
There will be a special guided tour of the new ISAW exhibition in New York exploring the influence of antiquity on early 20th century dance titled “Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes” on April 11 at 4.30pm at ISAW (15 E. 84th St.). The tour is free for SCS members but space in the galleries is limited, so please sign up for the tour here.
 
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 03/29/2019 - 9:31am by Erik Shell.

Aaron Poochigian is a poet and translator based in New York City. After receiving his PhD in Classics from the University of Minnesota in 2006 (with a dissertation on “The Staging of Aeschylus’ Persians, Seven Against Thebes, and Suppliants”), Aaron pursued a career translating Ancient Greek poetry and composing his own. His poetry has been featured in Best American Poetry 2018 (eds. Lehman and Gioia), Poetry, and Poems Out Loud. His collection, Manhattanite, won the Able Muse Book Award for Poetry (2017) and features such wonderful verses as these, about a blizzard:

                        Doomed, though, like ice is doomed, this wicked bright

                        Seagull Behemoth soon must furl his gusts

                        and die the same slow way the drifts accrued,

                        like mad ambition, like a winter mood,

                        when revolutions cut him down to crusts

                        and vision settles gentler on the sight. (from Blizzard Bird)

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/29/2019 - 7:35am by Christopher Trinacty.

Call for paper – Aegyptus et Pannonia 6:

Health and Life in Ancient Egypt
Mummies in Focus
Conference 27-30 August 2019, Budapest

The Hungarian Egyptian Friendship Society (HEFS / MEBT) with its partners, the Hungarian Natural History Museum and The Hungarian National Museums’s Semmelweis Medical History Museum, invites all colleagues and specialists to participate in the conference. The conference aims to provide a forum for the discussion of the situation of ancient Egyptian health state mirrored by the mummies.
As it can only be investigated with scientific methods, anthropological, medical, ethnographical, physical knowledge, Egyptological and environmental studies, it will cover a broad range of lectures and posters. The conference addresses the subject in a multidisciplinary way, and by embracing a broad chronological and cultural span, from Predynastic to the Coptic Period.
We invite colleagues of diverse research backgrounds and of differing specialisms. Theoretical questions and comparative approaches to other cultures are invited as well and all other topics which develop our understanding of ancient Egypt in this respect.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 03/28/2019 - 9:24am by Erik Shell.
Being Alone in Antiquity
Ancient Ideas and Experiences of Misanthropy, Isolation, and Solitude.
 
Conference dateApril 23-24, 2020.
Conference venueEdmundsburg, Mönchsberg 2, 5020 Salzburg (Austria).
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/27/2019 - 11:18am by Erik Shell.

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