NEH Awards Grants to Six Classically-Themed Projects

Edit: This post has been updated to include the projects by Justin Leidwanger, Darian Totten, and Giovanni De Venuto, omissions pointed out to SCS staff by Nicola Terrenato

The NEH has recently released its list of grant recepients for 2016. Included are six projects on Classical themes that focus on various aspects of ancient history and material culture from Rome to the Middle East. They are:

  • The "implementation of a traveling exhibition, a catalog, and associated programs about the 3,000-year tradition of animal-shaped vessels in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean" (Directed by Susanne Ebbinghaus)
  • An "archaeological excavation and analysis at the ancient city site of Gabii, near Rome" (Directed by Nicola Terrenato)
  • A grant toward the "completion of a monograph on the history of Masada, a mountain fortress overlooking the Dead Sea, from early exploration in the first Century B.C.E. to Jewish revolt and Masada's fall to Rome" (Directed by Jodi Magness)
  • "A four-week college and university institute for twenty five participants, on migration and the Roman Empire" (Directed by Richard Talbert)
  • The excavation of an underwater shipwreck site at Marzamemi (Directed by Justin Leidwanger)
  • The excavation of a lagoon site in Apulia (Directed by Darian Totten and Giovanni De Venuto

To see the full list of NEH grant awardees, see their full list here.

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(Photo: "Stone@Dead Sea Scrolls" by Lux Moundi, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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As one of the cornerstones upon which Classical scholarship has been built, much has already been said about Marcus Tullius Cicero. He has a sizable extant corpus that contains different genres, which in turn vary in style and topic. Furthermore, Cicero was a prominent political figure when the Roman Republic was falling and the Caesars were rising. Because of the nature of his corpus and the man himself, Cicero is an attractive topic of research not only for the traditional scholar but for a digital humanist as well. His large and varied corpus is promising for distant reading techniques, which allow us to examine and explore all of his works, thereby all of Cicero, easily and quickly. Through those digital techniques, we can gain a more complete view of who this ancient Roman man was.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 7:50am by Caitlin Marley.
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The early registration deadline for the 2019 AIA-SCS Annual Meeting in San Diego is Friday November 9. Register on or before that date in order to benefit from the early rate. You can register here.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 11/06/2018 - 6:20pm by Helen Cullyer.

This post has recently been updated with a response from Brill.

The SCS Statement on Professional Ethics emphasizes the need for due diligence regarding the provenance of artifacts in many different areas of scholarly work, including initial publications of objects and texts and the management of institutional collections. In recognition of the importance of this issue, the SCS Board of Directors has voted to endorse an open letter on the publication of fragments that were acquired by the Museum of the Bible and published by Brill. You can read the text of the letter below, which was originally published by Dr. Roberta Mazza on November 5, 2018 and signed by many individuals. You can also read the response from Brill, originally published by Dr. Mazza on November 7.

Open letter to Brill: Fake and unprovenanced manuscripts

For the attention of Brill.

FAKE AND UNPROVENANCED MANUSCRIPTS

On 22 October 2018, the Museum of the Bible issued a press release informing the public that five of their recently acquired fragments that were claimed to come from the Dead Sea Scrolls are modern forgeries. These five forgeries are included in the first volume of the series ‘Publications of Museum of the Bible’ which was published by Brill in 2016.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Tue, 11/06/2018 - 5:37pm by Helen Cullyer.

Natural Not Yet Understood: The Supernatural from Antiquity to the Medieval Period

Department of Classical Studies, Brandeis University
Graduate Student Conference
April 13th, 2019

Keynote Speaker: Professor Debbie Felton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Humans have always been drawn to the idea of creatures and worlds that exist alongside or outside of our own. These extraordinary ideas can take many forms, from average people with usual abilities to worlds of the dead and fantastic beasts. But as Elbert Hubbard once said, “The supernatural is the natural not yet understood.” Today, we have realized that many of the past’s supernatural events were simply misunderstood natural phenomena. We seek papers roughly 10 minutes in length that explore this idea of the supernatural of the distant past either within its original context or through a modern lens.

Possible topics include: Ancient religion, cultic practices, divination, ghosts and spirits, magic and witchcraft, monsters and the monstrous, mythology, and the preternatural more generally.

We welcome submissions that touch on these and similar topics from graduate students of all levels and from disciplines including: Anthropology, Art History, Classics, Comparative Literature, History, Jewish Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Sexuality Studies, and Women’s Studies.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 11/05/2018 - 10:25am by Erik Shell.

SCS

SCS members can apply for funds to support childcare / dependent care provided either in San Diego or in other locations during the Annual Meeting. To apply, please email helen.cullyer@nyu.edu by November 30 with the following information

I.  Name and mailing address
II. Reason for attending the meeting
III. Amount of funds requested and a brief explanation of how those funds would be used
IV. Any other applications that you have made for childcare / dependent care funding
 
WCC

The WCC provides chidcare/caregiver support at or during the SCS/AIA. Applicants for grants should e-mail the current WCC co-chairs (wccofscs@gmail.com) with a brief statement explaining their purpose in attending the meeting (i.e. job interviews, presentation of or commentary on a paper, attendance at panels) along with the following information in the e-mail: a. rank in field (graduate/ undergraduate/post-doctoral); b. employment status (graduate student/temporary position/tenure-track or tenured); c. any financial support offered by home institution; and d. a rough estimate of the total expense requested.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/05/2018 - 8:03am by Erik Shell.

Registration for the Career Networking event at the 2019 Annual Meeting is now open. This special event is co-sponsored by SCS and the Paideia Institute.  Graduate students and contingent faculty interested in careers outside of academia are encouraged to attend.  There is no extra charge for this event but space is limited.

Registered attendees of the 2019 meeting can sign up for this event by filling out this form. Sign up will be open until November 30th or close sooner if the event reaches capacity before that date. 

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/05/2018 - 7:57am by Erik Shell.

As Benjamin Isaac concisely stated in a 2016 piece in Eidolon,[i] the “pseudo-scientific roots” of American racism can be traced back to Ancient Greek theories of human difference. A crucial text quoted at length by Isaac is Airs, Waters, Places . Preserved as a medical document in the Hippocratic Corpus , this treatise argues that climate has a strong influence on human biology and human society: some climates are conducive to bodily health and social flourishing, while others are conducive to disease and lack of ‘civilized’ society. Isaac cites this text as foundational for the later development of theories of race:

The form of environmental determinism that was first found in Airs, Waters, Places became the generally accepted model in Greece and, afterwards — with variations — in Rome. According to this view, collective characteristics are permanently determined by climate and geography, implying that the essential features of body and mind come from the outside and are not the result of genetic evolution, social environment, or conscious choice.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 11/01/2018 - 4:27pm by Lisl Walsh.

Calls for Papers are already out for Affiliated Group Panels and Organizer Refereed Panels that will take place at the AIA-SCS 2020 meeting.

You can click the links above to go directly to those CFPs, or you can view the 2020 Annual Meeting page here.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/31/2018 - 3:00pm by Erik Shell.

The Society for Ancient Studies (SAS)—an interdisciplinary graduate student organization at New York University—is hosting a one-day undergraduate conference on the ancient world on Friday, February 8th , 2019 in Manhattan. This conference, organized and moderated by graduate students for talented undergraduates in New York and surrounding states, will offer participants the opportunity to present their scholarship in the engaged professional setting of an academic conference.

Participants will be expected to present a 15-minute paper to a forum of their undergraduate peers, graduate students, and NYU faculty. Submissions may be a condensed version, or a particularly strong chapter, of an undergraduate thesis, an exceptional course paper, or an independent research project. We welcome work informed by any and all theories and methodologies, and encourage submission from students working in any discipline (e.g. Classical Philology, Anthropology, Archaeology, History, etc.) or geo-temporal focus ( e.g. Mediterranean and Atlantic Studies; Egyptology; Pre-Columbian, Near East, and East Asian Civilizations; Medieval Studies, etc.) .

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/31/2018 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.

Call for Volunteers

The Society for Classical Studies seeks graduate or undergraduate student volunteers for the 150th Annual Meeting in San Diego, California, which will take place this coming January.  Assignments will include working in the registration area and assisting staff with some sessions and special events.

In exchange for six hours of service (down two hours from last year), volunteers receive a waiver of their annual meeting registration fees.  It is not necessary to be an SCS member to volunteer.

You can sign up to be a volunteer here. The deadline to sign up is November 21st.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 10/30/2018 - 9:04am by Erik Shell.

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