NEH Awards Grants to Six Classically-Themed Projects

Edit: This post has been updated to include the projects by Justin Leidwanger, Darian Totten, and Giovanni De Venuto, omissions pointed out to SCS staff by Nicola Terrenato

The NEH has recently released its list of grant recepients for 2016. Included are six projects on Classical themes that focus on various aspects of ancient history and material culture from Rome to the Middle East. They are:

  • The "implementation of a traveling exhibition, a catalog, and associated programs about the 3,000-year tradition of animal-shaped vessels in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean" (Directed by Susanne Ebbinghaus)
  • An "archaeological excavation and analysis at the ancient city site of Gabii, near Rome" (Directed by Nicola Terrenato)
  • A grant toward the "completion of a monograph on the history of Masada, a mountain fortress overlooking the Dead Sea, from early exploration in the first Century B.C.E. to Jewish revolt and Masada's fall to Rome" (Directed by Jodi Magness)
  • "A four-week college and university institute for twenty five participants, on migration and the Roman Empire" (Directed by Richard Talbert)
  • The excavation of an underwater shipwreck site at Marzamemi (Directed by Justin Leidwanger)
  • The excavation of a lagoon site in Apulia (Directed by Darian Totten and Giovanni De Venuto

To see the full list of NEH grant awardees, see their full list here.

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(Photo: "Stone@Dead Sea Scrolls" by Lux Moundi, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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This is a reminder that the deadline for nominating a teacher for the SCS Excellence in Precollegiate Teaching Award is September 8th, 2017

Teachers, full- or part-time, of grades K-12 in schools in the United States and Canada who at the time of the application teach at least one class of Latin, Greek, or classics at the K-12 level are eligible. Membership in the SCS is not required.

To see a full description, visit the main webpage for the award here: https://classicalstudies.org/awards-and-fellowships/scs-awards-excellenc...

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/01/2017 - 11:25am by Erik Shell.

From Democracy to Authoritarianism: The Death of the Roman Republic
Thursday, March 29, 2018   7:00–8:30 pm EDT
Leader: Michael Fontaine, Professor of Classics, Cornell University

Comparisons between ancient Rome and the United States are suddenly all around us. Why, and what do they portend? Right around the time Jesus was born, ancient Rome’s 500-year-old republic failed. Its traditions of representative elections, checks and balances, tolerance, and freedoms of movement and expression were swept away, never to recover. In their place rose the Roman Empire, an increasingly authoritarian and Orwellian structure that saw state-sponsored persecutions of minorities, artists, and dissidents at home, endless foreign wars abroad, and, eventually, even the requirement for all citizens to believe certain theological propositions. How did Rome transform in this way, and why did it never go back? This webinar will highlight political institutions, imperial expansion, the breakdown of republican institutions, the civil wars, and a few personalities whose names, 2000 years on, are still familiar to us all.

You can register for this webinar here: https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/2199485434755233026

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 08/30/2017 - 9:43am by Erik Shell.
Colosseum

The SCS is delighted to share the results of a collaborative initiative led by Jane Chaplin, Barbara Gold, Bret Mulligan, and Michael Arnush.

The product of work by 31 department chairs, the new Handbook for Chairs of Undergraduate Classics Departments and Programs aims to assist current and future chairs and directors at institutions that focus on undergraduate Classics education.

Here you can find a link to their website, or you can go directly to the handbook itself.

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(Photo: "The Colosseum" by Sean MacEntee, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 08/29/2017 - 12:33pm by Erik Shell.
"Gate, Pompeii, Italy". Brooklyn Museum, Goodyear.
Strolling through the ruins of Pompeii is an evocative and multi-sensory experience that has inspired generations of visitors to imagine what life was like in a small Roman town. Unfortunately, most American students cannot afford to visit in person, and attempting to recreate that transformative experience in the classroom is challenging. The recent emergence of Virtual Reality (VR) headsets as serious platforms for scientific visualization, however, is transforming our ability to develop experiential learning environments for our students. 
In spring 2017, my colleague David Fredrick and I developed two experimental courses, titled “Virtual Reality Pompeii: Street Life and Urban Culture,” designed to study a street in Pompeii with an eye toward the intersection of commercial and domestic activity and public and private space. Using virtual technology to recreate those spaces, students produced 3-D models of a section of the via dell’Abbondanza (Regio IX and Regio I) for use with VR headsets. Focusing on the streetscape, as opposed to civic spaces like the forum, provides a more holistic approach to urban experience in a Roman town. We plan to use the student-designed models both to enhance classroom teaching and as a tool for advancing research into spatial cognition in Roman towns.
 
View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/28/2017 - 12:00am by Rhodora G. Vennarucci.
 Soldiers carrying banners depicting Julius Caesar's triumphant military exploits, from The Triumph of Julius Caesar

Latinists enjoy ready access to online texts collected under names like Perseus, PHI, and the Latin Library, collections which are now as much a fixture of scholarly workflows as OCTs, Teubners, and Loebs. Descriptive data and statistics about these texts are harder to find. How many times does Lucretius use the future imperative? How many ablatives absolute are there in Cicero’s De amicitia? Where does ensis appear in Caesar’s writings? (Answers at the end of this post.) Opera Latina is a search interface from the Laboratoire d’Analyse Statistique des Langues Anciennes (LASLA) at the University of Liège that draws on over five decades of linguistic research on Latin literature to return the sort of descriptive details posed in the questions above.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/21/2017 - 12:00am by Patrick J. Burns.

Lyric and the Sacred, 27 June – July 1 2018, Spetses, Greece

Lucia Athanassaki (University of Crete) and André Lardinois (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen) announce the 5th Open Conference which they are co-organizing on behalf of the Network for the Study of Archaic and Classical Greek Song (http://www.ru.nl/greeksong).

The conference will take place on the island of Spetses in Greece from June 27th to July 1st 2018. The topic of the conference is ‘Lyric and the Sacred’.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:38am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers:

Wilderness, Frontiers, and New Worlds in Antiquity

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

New York University

November 4, 2017

Keynote: Prof. Emily Greenwood (Yale University) "Classics and the Travelers' Kit: literature on ancient and modern frontiers"

Unfamiliar, unexplored, and unsettled places captivated the ancient imagination and were of pressing importance not only to poets and prose writers of every genre, but also to merchants, militaries, and governing bodies enticed by the prospects of new sites for trading, settling, and conquering. There has been a swell of critical interest recently in the topics of borders and boundaries in the ancient world, as part of the increased scholarly attention to space over the past few decades. Our conference is interested in spaces beyond borders, and we aim to explore ancient encounters with wilderness, frontiers, and unknown lands.

Possible topics include:

•   Visual representations of wilderness and extreme environments

•   Representations in ancient texts of the landscape, weather, and human adaptation in unexplored lands

•   Narrations and theorizations of journeys undersea, into the sky, or below the earth

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:34am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers for the 2018 Symposium Cumanum:
rerum cognoscere causas: Learning in the Late Republic and the Augustan Age

June 26–30, 2018

Co-Directors: T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University) and Christopher B. Polt (Boston College)
Confirmed speakers: Barbara Weiden Boyd, Monica R. Gale, Steven J. Green, Alison Keith, James J. O'Hara, and Alessandro Schiesaro

The Vergilian Society invites proposals for papers for the 2018 Symposium Cumanum at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma, Italy.

Learning and teaching were fundamental to Roman literature from the start: Livius Andronicus, the primus auctor of Latin letters, was first a teacher whose pedagogic experiences profoundly shaped his own writing (Feeney, Beyond Greek). Instruction becomes a special interest in the culture and literature of the late Republic and Augustan periods, when attitudes towards education find complex, fluid, and multivalent expressions (Bloomer, The School of Rome). This symposium aims to interrogate the varied, shifting roles that teaching and learning play in this pivotal period, especially with reference to the literary milieu in which Vergil was educated and to which he contributed.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 08/15/2017 - 3:00pm by Erik Shell.
McKeldin Library

(From insidehighered.com)

Scott Jaschik from Inside Higher Ed has written a story about the statement the SCS board released last Fall.

"The statement notes that the ancient world was not monolithic and in fact was influenced by people of different regions and cultures."

You can read the full piece at Inside Higher Ed here, and read the board's original statement from last Fall here.

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(Photo: "McKeldin Library, University of Maryland" by George Williams, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 08/15/2017 - 8:18am by Erik Shell.

Annual Ancient Philosophy Workshop

The Annual Ancient Philosophy Workshop (41st in the series inauguratedand periodically sponsored by The University of Texas at Austin) will be held February 23-24, 2018, at The University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. This workshop is sponsored by the UF Department of Philosophy in coordination with the UF Department of Classics, with support from the UF Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Proposals are invited for papers on any problem, figure, or issue in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Each paper will be allotted forty-five minutes for oral presentation and will be followed by open discussion.

To propose a paper, send a 1-page abstract of 300-500 words to palmerj@ufl.edu under the subject heading “Workshop Proposal.” Please provide contact information in the email but no identifying info in the abstract itself. Proposals are due no later than Friday, December 1, 2017. Proposers will be notified of selections by Friday, December 15. Complete papers will be due to session chairs and respondents by Friday, January 26, 2018.

Proposals or questions to:

palmerj.ufl.edu

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 08/14/2017 - 2:45pm by Erik Shell.

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