NEH Awards Grants to Six Classically-Themed Projects

Edit: This post has been updated to include the projects by Justin Leidwanger, Darian Totten, and Giovanni De Venuto, omissions pointed out to SCS staff by Nicola Terrenato

The NEH has recently released its list of grant recepients for 2016. Included are six projects on Classical themes that focus on various aspects of ancient history and material culture from Rome to the Middle East. They are:

  • The "implementation of a traveling exhibition, a catalog, and associated programs about the 3,000-year tradition of animal-shaped vessels in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean" (Directed by Susanne Ebbinghaus)
  • An "archaeological excavation and analysis at the ancient city site of Gabii, near Rome" (Directed by Nicola Terrenato)
  • A grant toward the "completion of a monograph on the history of Masada, a mountain fortress overlooking the Dead Sea, from early exploration in the first Century B.C.E. to Jewish revolt and Masada's fall to Rome" (Directed by Jodi Magness)
  • "A four-week college and university institute for twenty five participants, on migration and the Roman Empire" (Directed by Richard Talbert)
  • The excavation of an underwater shipwreck site at Marzamemi (Directed by Justin Leidwanger)
  • The excavation of a lagoon site in Apulia (Directed by Darian Totten and Giovanni De Venuto

To see the full list of NEH grant awardees, see their full list here.

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(Photo: "Stone@Dead Sea Scrolls" by Lux Moundi, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The University of Edinburgh, in collaboration with the University of St Andrews and the University of Glasgow, will host the Seventh Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW) from 23-24 November 2017. This conference is generously supported by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology (University of Edinburgh), the School of Classics (University of St Andrews), the Scottish Graduate School for Arts and Humanities (SGSAH), the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies (SPHS), the Classical Association (CA) and the Classical Association of Scotland (CAS).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 3:06pm by Erik Shell.

The Penn-Leiden Colloquia on Ancient Values were established as a biennial venue in which scholars could investigate the diverse aspects of Greek and Roman values. Each colloquium focuses on a single theme, which participants explore from various perspectives and disciplines. A collection of papers from the first colloquium, held at Leiden in 2000, was published in 2003 under the title ‘Andreia’— Manliness and Courage in Classical Antiquity. This was followed by Free Speech in Classical Antiquity, (2005), City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Classical Antiquity (2006), KAKOS: Badness and Anti-Values in Classical Antiquity (2008), Valuing Others in Classical Antiquity (2010), Aesthetic Value in Classical Antiquity (2012, all edd. Ralph Rosen and Ineke Sluiter), Valuing the Past in the Greco-Roman World (2014, edd. James Ker and Christoph Pieper), Valuing Landscapes in Classical Antiquity (edd. Jeremy McInerney and Ineke Sluiter), and Eris vs. Aemulatio: Competition in Classical Antiquity (in preparation, edd. Cynthia Damon and Christoph Pieper). All volumes have been published by Brill Publishers.

The topic of the tenth colloquium, to be held at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, June 14-16, 2018, will be:

BETWEEN DUSK AND DAWN
Valuing Night in Classical Antiquity

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 2:51pm by Erik Shell.
Dublin

The Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies (ICCS) has started a GoFundMe page in order to establish a scholarship in honor of Garrett Fagan, who passed away earlier this year.

"Garrett will always be remembered as an influential mentor, an inspiring teacher, a supportive colleague, a loving father, and a fierce friend, and for this reason, we've decided to establish a scholarship in Garrett's name for the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome."

You can visit the GoFundMe page to read the rest of the information about the proposed scholarship or to donate.

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(Photo: "Dublin, Ireland" by Giuseppe Milo, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 2:24pm by Erik Shell.

Position Title: Managing Editor, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (DOML)

Supervisor: Director of Dumbarton Oaks

Department: Director’s Office

Hours: Full-time, 35 hours per week

Duties and Responsibilities

The Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (DOML), published by Harvard University Press, launched in 2010 with the mission to offer major literary texts of medieval and Byzantine culture in literature, history, philosophy, and other realms of learning. The series has three aims: to make texts readily accessible in both content and price to a broad readership of English speakers, while also meeting the standards of experts; to equip non-specialist readers with the basic information needed to understand and appreciate the text; and to keep volumes in print for a long time. Each volume is bilingual, presenting a source text with an English translation on the facing page.  General readers, undergraduate and graduate students, and professional scholars from within and without medieval and Byzantine studies are the target audience. DOML began with a focus on three languages: Byzantine Greek, Medieval Latin, and Old English. The series now numbers 49 volumes, and is poised to incorporate additional vernacular languages with a new subseries, Medieval Iberia.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 11:41am by Erik Shell.

Election materials are now online.  These materials include all candidate statements and the text of the new Working Conditions statement, which, if approved by the membership, will become part of the Society's Professional Ethics statement.  Voting will begin on August 1, 2017.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 10:42am by Helen Cullyer.

The SCS Placement Service has finished its 2016-2017 Placement season. Institutional reporting information on who was hired or the results of those searches - as required by our Placement Service Guidelines - can be found on this page.

If there are any results that have been finalized but do not appear on that page please have the hiring department contact the Placement Service coordinator Erik Shell at erik.shell@nyu.edu.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/27/2017 - 10:07am by Erik Shell.
Compositing Bench

Traditional presses play a vital role in classical studies. Nevertheless, many scholars have written a book that may be better served by other means. For some, this book is a monograph, a collection of essays, or a revised edition that a publisher did not consider financially viable. For others, it is a much-needed commentary or translation. For still others, it is a collaborative research project created with engaged students. There will always be high-quality books that traditional publishers consider too costly to produce. Self-publishing and print-on-demand offer classicists a suitable alternative.

As the author of a self-published book in classical studies, I exercise almost complete control over my work. I have the power to sell my book at the price I choose; if I wish to change the price from $20 to $15, I can do so with a single click. If a reader notices a typo, I can make the correction at my kitchen table and guarantee that a revised paperback will be available within twenty-four hours. If I decide to rewrite several paragraphs, or update the book to reflect the most recent secondary literature, those changes will appear within a day. As author and self-publisher, I am not worried that a book to which I devoted several years of my life will go out of print. I alone make that decision, and it costs nothing to keep a book available. If I want to publish a second edition, that too is my call.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/26/2017 - 12:00am by Geoffrey Steadman.

What’s So Funny?

Discovering and Interpreting Humor in the Ancient World

20-21 April 2018

The Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio 

Keynote Speakers:

•    Jack Sasson (Emeritus Professor, Vanderbilt University)

•    Ian Ruffell (Classics, University of Glasgow)

•    Amy Richlin (Classics, University of California at Los Angeles)

•    Christine Hayes (Religious Studies, Yale University)

Humor is a ubiquitous human phenomenon with a wide range of applications. Yet, what is deemed humorous is often culturally determined. This poses a significant challenge for scholars of ancient cultures. How do we identify what an ancient culture found funny? How did they use humor, and what drove their usage?

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for scholars across disciplines to discuss and debate humor and its functions in both textual and material sources across the ancient Mediterranean, from the early Near East through late antiquity. We invite papers that address the above questions, or any others, on the topic of humor in an ancient Mediterranean context.  

Possible topics include:

•       Theoretical models for identifying and understanding humor and comedy in ancient cultures

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/23/2017 - 7:48am by Erik Shell.

The inaugural conference of the Canadian Aristotle Society conference will be May 9, 10, and 11, 2018, at the Dominican University College, Ottawa, ON.  The theme of this conference is the following:  Aristotle: A Critic of Plato. Please submit a one-page abstract to Dr. Mark Nyvlt at mark.nyvlt@dominicanu.ca.  The deadline is January 31st, 2018.  Our first Keynote speaker will be Dr. Thomas De Koninck.

The purpose of the bilingual Canadian Aristotle Society is to establish a Centre wherein the themes of Aristotle, along with the Aristotelian tradition, are kept alive by way of either conferences or eventually publications.  The spirit of this Society will be speculative and classical in nature, though this does not exclude the analytical and continental traditions.  That the Faculty of Philosophy at the Dominican University will house this Society can only enrich its mission to sustain the Aristotelian spirit by both the Anglophone and Francophone communities in Canada and beyond.  Their intention is to make this Society into a dynamic Centre that will attract primarily Aristotelian scholars, but also scholars and interested parties from various other disciplines, such as the classics, theology, politics, art, etc.

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Bonjour,

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 3:13pm by Erik Shell.

THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, 8-9 December 2017

We live in a multicultural world, in which every community develops in constant interaction with others. A series of theoretical models have been developed to explain these contacts, which in recent years have been utilized to understand the ancient world. In the context of the Roman empire, these theories are typically used to examine the interactions of various indigenous populations with their rulers. These kinds of studies were once grouped under the heading “Romanization”, though the increased questioning of the term’s validity has given rise to a diverse range of alternatives. These are often drawn from modern theoretical backgrounds: multiculturalism and multilingualism are two recent concepts employed in this realm.

The aim of this conference is to assess the validity and scope of a variety of some of these models, with a particular focus on multilingualism and multiculturalism. By promoting and facilitating dialogue between disciplines, we shall aim to provide effective tools for different fields’ approaches in parallel (e.g. historical and linguistic). This has already been done very successfully in a few cases (e.g. ‘code-switching’), though greater interaction remains a desideratum. It is hoped that the participants will thereby open the discussion for a ‘theory of contact’ in the Roman world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 8:40am by Erik Shell.

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