NEH Awards Grants to Six Classically-Themed Projects

Edit: This post has been updated to include the projects by Justin Leidwanger, Darian Totten, and Giovanni De Venuto, omissions pointed out to SCS staff by Nicola Terrenato

The NEH has recently released its list of grant recepients for 2016. Included are six projects on Classical themes that focus on various aspects of ancient history and material culture from Rome to the Middle East. They are:

  • The "implementation of a traveling exhibition, a catalog, and associated programs about the 3,000-year tradition of animal-shaped vessels in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean" (Directed by Susanne Ebbinghaus)
  • An "archaeological excavation and analysis at the ancient city site of Gabii, near Rome" (Directed by Nicola Terrenato)
  • A grant toward the "completion of a monograph on the history of Masada, a mountain fortress overlooking the Dead Sea, from early exploration in the first Century B.C.E. to Jewish revolt and Masada's fall to Rome" (Directed by Jodi Magness)
  • "A four-week college and university institute for twenty five participants, on migration and the Roman Empire" (Directed by Richard Talbert)
  • The excavation of an underwater shipwreck site at Marzamemi (Directed by Justin Leidwanger)
  • The excavation of a lagoon site in Apulia (Directed by Darian Totten and Giovanni De Venuto

To see the full list of NEH grant awardees, see their full list here.

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(Photo: "Stone@Dead Sea Scrolls" by Lux Moundi, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The second meeting of the North American Sections of the International Plutarch Society will take place 15-18 May 2019 at Utah State University in Logan and Park City, Utah. Logan is ninety minutes north of the Salt Lake City International hub airport and convenient to many national parks and other attractions. Plenary sessions will examine the topic of "Plutarch's Unexpected Silences" in tranquil and beautiful mountain settings as we conclude our meeting in the former mining town of Park City, Utah.

"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences" asks us to consider those times in the Parallel Lives or Moralia when we are surprised that Plutarch does not say something, or when he leaves something out. Whether this occurs by mistake or by design in Plutarch's work, we propose focusing on those passages that foil our expectations or whose silence invites a closer examination. We would also like to consider other odd omissions, perhaps of authors or works, or places even, that Plutarch might be expected to know, or even suspected of knowing.

Abstracts will be judged anonymously by the organizing committee.

The deadline for consideration is 30 November 2018.

Please see also our website: https://ipsnortham.org/.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/08/2018 - 12:51pm by Erik Shell.

We would like to remind you of this year's call for applications for the Minority Scholarships in Classics and Classical Archaeology.

The purpose of the scholarship is to further undergraduate students’ preparation in classics or classical archaeology with opportunities not available during the school year. Eligible proposals might include (but are not limited to) participation in classical summer programs or field schools in Italy, Greece, Egypt, etc., or language training at institutions in the U.S, Canada, or Europe.

You can read more about the scholarship and how to apply here.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 10/08/2018 - 11:20am by Erik Shell.

The deadline to apply for the TLL Fellowship is November 16, 2018. The application includes many parts, and so should be started early.

Applications must be received by the deadline of Friday, November 16, 2018, at 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time. Applications should be submitted as e-mail attachments to Dr. Helen Cullyer, Executive Director, Society for Classical Studies, xd@classicalstudies.org.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 10/05/2018 - 1:14pm by Erik Shell.

Teachers of Classics have been impacted by hurricane Florence.

ACL and SCS are launching a joint initiative that will help connect institutions in need with our members who are able to offer assistance.

If you are a teacher or faculty member at an institution whose academic programs have been interrupted, suspended, or impacted by the recent hurricane, you may fill out the form linked below to request financial assistance that will accelerate the recovery of your classes and programs. You need not be an ACL or SCS member to request help.

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

Once we have received your form, an ACL or SCS staff member will contact you to verify your identity and the nature of your request. We will then publish verified requests on our websites and via our social media accounts so that our members can reach out to institutions in need and offer direct financial help. We feel that this is the quickest way of getting funds to the schools, colleges, and universities that need them.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/05/2018 - 10:15am by Erik Shell.
YouTube-TedEd screenshot from “A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome” animated by Cognitive Media and written and narrated by Ray Laurence (Image under a CC BY -- NC -- ND 4.0 International license).

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3-6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. Today we highlight the Animated Antiquity: A Showcase of Cartoon Representations of Ancient Greece and Rome workshop by interviewing Ray Laurence (Macquarie University) about his work using animation to teach Roman daily life.



Cartoons and Animated Films written by Ray Laurence:

A Glimpse of Teenage Life in Ancient Rome

Four Sisters in Ancient Rome

Roman Nursing Goddess – The Dea Nutrix

What is Humanities Research at the University of Kent?

How Immigration Shaped Britain – part 1

A Day in the Life of a Roman Client

Q. How was the idea of an educational cartoon first developed and pitched?

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 10/04/2018 - 2:12pm by Sarah Bond.

Last year the Classical Studies Department at the University of Michigan announced the launch of its Bridge MA, a fully funded program designed to prepare scholars from diverse backgrounds for entry into one of Michigan’s Ph.D. programs in Classical Studies or related fields. There are few programs like it, particularly at public universities. One of its architects, Professor Sara Ahbel-Rappe, recently received a competitive award for her diversity efforts. I connected with her along with Dr. Young Richard Kim, the Onassis Foundation’s new Director of Educational Programs, to discuss Michigan’s diversity efforts and its partnership with the Onassis Foundation.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 10/03/2018 - 6:04am by Arum Park.
April 11th-13th, 2019 – University of Kentucky – Lexington, Kentucky
Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Classics Section

Deadline for Abstract Submission: November 12th, 2018, 11:59 PM EST

Paper presentations are 20 minutes followed by a 10-minute question & answer session. In addition to individual abstracts for paper presentations, proposals for panels of 5 papers will be considered. Papers are welcomed from graduate students, post-docs, and faculty. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and the deadline is November 12th, 2018 before midnight EST. Online submissions https://kflc.as.uky.edu/

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/02/2018 - 9:19am by Erik Shell.
150th Logo

The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) has been awarded a grant of $150,000 by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will advance two strategic priorities of the organization: (a) engaging a public audience in the appreciation and critical discussion of the ancient world and its legacy; and (b) addressing diversity and inclusion in the field of Classics within the US and globally.

The grant will support a consultant, who, as Public Engagement Coordinator, will document and evaluate public events planned for 2019, the Society's Sesquicentennial year; and plan and develop new public-facing programs and resources. The grant also includes a pool of funding for mini-grants for public programming in 2020. The grant will also provide support for: travel stipends for students from historically underrepresented minority groups and students committed to increasing diversity and inclusion within the field to attend the Society's upcoming annual meetings; events related to race, ethnicity, diversity, and inclusion at the meetings; and travel for invited speakers from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. As SCS approaches it Sesquicentennial year, this award will enable the Society to meet its short-term goals and build capacity for the longer term.


View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/28/2018 - 11:27am by Helen Cullyer.
Image of A.E. Stalling’s new book of poetry, Like, and a scarf with its cover printed on it (Image used by permission and taken by John Psaropoulos).

This month in her ‘art of translation’ column, Adrienne K.H. Rose interviews A.E. Stallings while in Pylos and then in Virginia. The two discuss the word choices made by translators, the surprising relevance of Archaic poetry in the tumultuous present era, and the effects of living life in a foreign language.

Q: How did you decide to study Classics?

Gradually, then suddenly—I didn't start taking Latin until college [at the University of Georgia], where I was initially an English and Music major, but I started with Latin 1, and just kept taking more and more Latin and Classics courses until finally the department (in particular Rick LaFleur, then Dept. head), gently suggested I change majors.

Q: Could you say a bit about the significance of learning Latin and Greek and translating Classics and its impact on you?

It changed my understanding of writing poetry for one thing.  As I've said elsewhere, I realized how contemporary Catullus sounded, but also that he was writing in very strict poetic forms.  I realized you could sound modern and scan. I realized that ancient poets often sounded more up-to-date to me than a lot of what I was reading in contemporary literary journals. It removed some anxiety I had about the modern literary scene.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/27/2018 - 3:52pm by Adrienne K.H. Rose.

Below are the citations for the winners of our 2018 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit. Please join us in congratulating this year's winners.

Gil H. Renberg

Amy Richlin

Harriet I. Flower

Gil H. RenbergWhere Dreams May Come:  Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World.  Leiden:  Brill, 2017.

Sweet dreams, bad dreams, broken dreams, impossible dreams, dream jobs, dreams come true, dreamy dates, dream teams, the American dream, only in your dreams, dream on: dreams are among our most familiar experiences but wonderfully mysterious all the same. In modern times dreams tend to be something internal and personal, perhaps mere nonsense, perhaps an expression of wishes and fears conscious or unconscious. For classical peoples, dreams were something more, signs from outside, indeed an important channel for divine-human communication. And so incubation – sleeping in a place where dreams may come – was a multi-faceted practice throughout the ancient world from earliest times to late antiquity: a practice undertaken for therapy, for cures, for enlightenment, and for revelations.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/27/2018 - 12:35pm by Erik Shell.

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