Obituary for Corinne Ondine Pache

The following obituary is reposted from legacy.com.

You can read the original posting at this link.

"We collectively mourn the loss of Dr. Corinne Ondine Pache, Professor of Classical Studies and a cherished member of the Trinity University community, who ended her battle with cancer on July 20, 2022. Corinne was an accomplished scholar, revered teacher and mentor, and terrific friend to many all over the globe. She will be sorely missed.

By her own account, Corinne was, in some ways, an accidental classicist. Originally from Lausanne, Switzerland, she enrolled in her twenties as a first-generation undergraduate at Hunter College in New York City and-like so many others before her-took a classics course on a whim. At Hunter, she fell in love with the classical languages, especially ancient Greek. Her intellectual pursuits then took her to Harvard for a doctorate, with research on archaic Greek poetry and religion. Her first professorship, at Yale University, saw the publication of her book on child heroes in ancient Greece; from Yale she moved to Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas and published her second major work on Greek religion on the complex topic of "nympholepsy" - the assault of mortal men by goddesses. For much of the 2010s, Corinne labored on what would be her magnum opus: the monumental and invaluable Cambridge Guide to Homer (2020), the result of many years of editing, people-wrangling, and sheer scholarship. Throughout these volumes and her many articles-including such far-flung topics as Virgilian echoes in Battlestar Galactica-Corinne brought to bear her customary acumen, literary sensibility, and graceful style.

Since her arrival at Trinity in 2009, Corinne seemed somehow ubiquitous, with stints as acting chair, as Senator, as a First Year Experience coordinator, and more: Corinne never shied from heavy lifting, and colleagues found her a delight to work with in all of her administrative capacities. Students adored her - she innovated several courses, including the popular social history course Daily Life in Ancient Greece. She was also instrumental in setting up one of Trinity's first Humanities Labs, dedicated to the early manuscript tradition of Homer, while often sending students for additional training at Harvard's Center for Hellenic Studies, where she was a frequent collaborator. It was in her two upper-division courses that Corinne worked in her most comparative vein: Epic Journeys examined narratives of travel and growth from a variety of cultures while The Homeric Odyssey plumbed the influence of Homer's epic on subsequent artists, from James Joyce to Alison Bechdel to Derek Walcott. Corinne overflowed with a love of books-not unlike her office and home!-and that passion overflowed into her classroom as well. A student once gushed: "I want to take a class with Dr. Pache every semester for my entire college career!" It's a sentiment shared by many (and for a lucky few, a wish come true).

Corinne was an amazing friend and colleague. She took the Epicurean exhortation of "carpe diem" (seize the day) more seriously than anyone since Horace, and she made certain that her friends did too. Her passion for travel and adventure, for cuisine, for long walks in beautiful places, for summer afternoons at the pool, for a wide range of music and art, for tending her olive and lemon trees, and quiet evenings at home with her cats: all of these were part of her, and to spend time with Corinne was to spend time with a soul deeply attuned to the beauty and joy the world has to offer. Corinne never ceased wanting to learn, from Spanish irregular verbs to challenging piano pieces to a meditation technique that was new to her. She was a vibrant and beloved member of diverse social circles, meeting regularly with friends to taste wine, read and discuss great books, eat and discuss great meals, hike and explore new corners of her adopted Texas home, watch movies, cycle, practice yoga, lift weights, and dance Zumba. She was also profoundly concerned with helping others in the community, volunteering her language skills to help welcome Congolese asylum seekers. And she was a devoted friend to any feline lucky enough to cross her path, working enthusiastically with the Trinity Cat Alliance and her own brood of kitties, Oliver, Lenny and Jo.

Corinne is survived by family in Switzerland, including her mother, Mireille Dolay, and her brother, Phillipe Pache, as well as her nephew and niece, Bryan and Lea Pache. She was rich in her vast circle of loving friends, including Kathryn Slanski; George Syrimis; Tom Jenkins; Anna Stavrakopoulou; Adele Haft and Jordan Zinovich; Judith Norman; Lisa Jasinski and Patrick Keating; Tim O'Sullivan and Anadelia Romo; Bill and Barbara Sullivan; David Rando and Shannon Mariotti; Andrew Kania and Julie Post; Patti Hale; Julie LeBrun; Nicolle Hirschfeld; Alexander Beecroft and David Greven; Alison Marek; Sulochana Asirvatham; Stephen Colvin; Susanna Braund; Ronnie Ancona; Nicole Durish Gauthier; Corinne Béguin ; Katherine Wasdin; and many, many others.

A celebration of Corinne's life is planned for later this fall in San Antonio. In lieu of flowers, those who wish to donate in Corinne's honor may consider The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES), which provides aid and support to immigrant families; or the San Antonio Humane Society.

We all struggle with this senseless loss and take comfort in knowing that Corinne lived life to the brim -and taught so many to do likewise. Sit tibi terra levis: may the earth lie lightly upon you, Corinne. We remain in perpetual gratitude for your life, learning, and legacy."

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Applications are available now online for the 2023/2024 Residential Grants and Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute in the following competitions:

  • Getty Scholar Grants
  • Pre- and Postdoctoral Fellowships

Applicants are invited to address one of the following future themes:

Art and Technology (Research Institute)

2023/2024

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/13/2022 - 10:22am by .
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At the end of every year, the National Language Resources Monitoring and Research Center in mainland China, an organization affiliated with the Chinese Ministry of Education, publishes a list of the most popular online words and phrases of the year. One entry in the 2021 list is tǎng píng (躺平), or “lying flat.” “Lying flat” denotes a posture both physical and political. It is a rejection of the “996” (9am–9pm, 6 days a week) work culture prevalent among China’s younger population. It is also a silent protest to widening income disparity, exorbitant housing costs in major cities, and the myth of a middle-class life.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/11/2022 - 2:47pm by .

The International Plato Society’s Symposium XIII will take place at the University of Georgia July 18-22.  The Symposium is entirely devoted to Plato’s Sophist.  It is hybrid with all papers simultaneously broadcast on Zoom.  A copy of the program is available on our site, Platosociety.org.

Remote and in-person registration are also available on our site.  You must be signed into the site in order to register.  Then, when you click on the “Register” button, are taken to a secure site at the University of Georgia.  Registration includes a copy of the published volume of selected papers.  All who are registered will be sent Zoom links on the morning on July 18.  Many of the papers that will be presented are posted and accessible to those who register.

If you have difficulties registering, try a different browser.  If that doesn’t work, contact us at webmaster@platosociety.org.

Athens, Georgia, the home of the University of Georgia, is quite a nice place, and we have arranged receptions every evening and a brief excursion.  Most of all, we have an excellent set of papers.

For more details and information click the link below:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 07/08/2022 - 2:13pm by .
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This is a two-part blog post reflecting upon AAPI experiences in classical studies. Part 1 reflected upon the author’s personal experience teaching race & ethnicity in antiquity in the context of the ongoing surge of anti-Asian violence in the country. Part 2 reflects upon the shared experiences of students and scholars of Asian descent in classical studies through a series of interviews.

Curious about whether other people of Asian descent in Classical Studies have had experiences similar to mine and how that affects our lives in the field, I reached out this spring to scholars and students from other institutions in North America, public and private, large and small, through the recently formed Asian & Asian American Classical Caucus (AAACC).

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/08/2022 - 12:56pm by .

Call for Papers 
Saturday, February 18, 2023 
University of Florida (Gainesville, FL) 

Sixth University of Florida Classics Graduate Student Symposium 

Movement and Mobility in Ancient Spheres  
Mobility and movement, which lie at the core of the human experience in both ancient and modern societies, hold a critical place in the study of the ancient Greco-Roman world. From Herodotus’ wanderings around the Persian Empire to Pausanias’ Periegesis and Lucian’s fantastic travels, Greco- Roman literature captures the intertemporal need and desire of individuals and groups of people to move and travel from one place to another. We can wonder, for instance, at Odysseus’s journey across the Mediterranean, Aeneas’ Underworld katabasis, or Trimalchio’s social advancement while recognizing the multiple considerations of movement in these narratives and at the same time reflect on what sort of mobility allows for these stories to be transmitted to us over millennia. 
 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 07/06/2022 - 11:00am by .

Contributed by Hanna M. Roisman:

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 07/06/2022 - 8:48am by .
A Black woman with short hair posed as Venus in Boticelli's Birth of Venus. She stands on an open seashell in the sea, and her body is adorned with patches of gold. On the right, a dark-skinned hand coming out of a white blouse holds an orange tapestry.

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 132 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. To date, it has funded projects in 28 states and 11 countries, including Canada, the UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/01/2022 - 10:52am by .
A white marble stele featuring two standing women and two seated women. The central standing woman holds the hand of the central seated woman.

With weary hearts, we consider with you what Classics can do in the face of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the Supreme Court decision overruling Roe v. Wade (1973) and Planned Parenthood of Pennsylvania v. Casey (1992). We bring you what we can from our own experience: Amy Richlin spent the 1990s teaching half in Gender Studies in the aftermath of the Reagan-Bush administration, when Planned Parenthood v. Casey was heard, and also taught Roman women’s history and sometimes Roman law during her years at USC and UCLA. Bruce Frier has been on the Faculty of the Michigan Law School since 1986 and has participated in numerous discussions and debates concerning Constitutional interpretation; he also chaired a Provostal Committee to improve the campus climate for LGBTQ+ faculty, students, and staff.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 06/29/2022 - 10:50am by .
A dark painting featuring men in togas. A number of men in the center wearing white togas reach towards an older man, seated in a brown toga. As they extend arms towards him, he pushes them away and looks aside.

This two-part series reflects upon AAPI experiences in Classical Studies. Part 1 is catalyzed by the author’s personal experience teaching race & ethnicity in antiquity in the context of the ongoing surge of anti-Asian violence in the country. Part 2 will reflect upon the shared experiences of students and scholars of Asian descent in Classical Studies through a series of interviews.

“Do you know about your Penn Law School colleague Amy Wax?,” a friend texted me in January, as the semester was starting.

“Blocked it out,” I thumbed back. I had, in fact, dimly seen the news, but the idea that a professor at the same university where I was excited to be newly teaching might be publicly rejecting the civic fitness of Asian Americans like me had, frankly, been too much to contemplate. “Good mental health strategy,” my friend responded dryly.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/27/2022 - 9:05am by .
A black-and-white image of the reverse of a diadrachm of Magas, dated 300–275 BCE, depicting the silphium plant, with a small crab on the right side and Greek letters interspersed in the branches of the plant.

I guess I should say “thank you.” Gratias vobis ago. Thank you to the Republican Party’s long game, a partisan SCOTUS, years of deliberate Democratic avoidance. You see, I’ve been wanting for a while to write a book about social control, forced reproduction, and their effects on real people living under an authoritarian government. Of course, I was planning to write about Augustan Rome. But with the Court’s decision yesterday, ending nearly 50 years of Roe (that is, legal abortion in America), I’ve got a great reception study. And in real time.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 06/25/2022 - 1:39am by .

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