Obituary for Corinne Ondine Pache

The following obituary is reposted from legacy.com.

You can read the original posting at this link.

"We collectively mourn the loss of Dr. Corinne Ondine Pache, Professor of Classical Studies and a cherished member of the Trinity University community, who ended her battle with cancer on July 20, 2022. Corinne was an accomplished scholar, revered teacher and mentor, and terrific friend to many all over the globe. She will be sorely missed.

By her own account, Corinne was, in some ways, an accidental classicist. Originally from Lausanne, Switzerland, she enrolled in her twenties as a first-generation undergraduate at Hunter College in New York City and-like so many others before her-took a classics course on a whim. At Hunter, she fell in love with the classical languages, especially ancient Greek. Her intellectual pursuits then took her to Harvard for a doctorate, with research on archaic Greek poetry and religion. Her first professorship, at Yale University, saw the publication of her book on child heroes in ancient Greece; from Yale she moved to Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas and published her second major work on Greek religion on the complex topic of "nympholepsy" - the assault of mortal men by goddesses. For much of the 2010s, Corinne labored on what would be her magnum opus: the monumental and invaluable Cambridge Guide to Homer (2020), the result of many years of editing, people-wrangling, and sheer scholarship. Throughout these volumes and her many articles-including such far-flung topics as Virgilian echoes in Battlestar Galactica-Corinne brought to bear her customary acumen, literary sensibility, and graceful style.

Since her arrival at Trinity in 2009, Corinne seemed somehow ubiquitous, with stints as acting chair, as Senator, as a First Year Experience coordinator, and more: Corinne never shied from heavy lifting, and colleagues found her a delight to work with in all of her administrative capacities. Students adored her - she innovated several courses, including the popular social history course Daily Life in Ancient Greece. She was also instrumental in setting up one of Trinity's first Humanities Labs, dedicated to the early manuscript tradition of Homer, while often sending students for additional training at Harvard's Center for Hellenic Studies, where she was a frequent collaborator. It was in her two upper-division courses that Corinne worked in her most comparative vein: Epic Journeys examined narratives of travel and growth from a variety of cultures while The Homeric Odyssey plumbed the influence of Homer's epic on subsequent artists, from James Joyce to Alison Bechdel to Derek Walcott. Corinne overflowed with a love of books-not unlike her office and home!-and that passion overflowed into her classroom as well. A student once gushed: "I want to take a class with Dr. Pache every semester for my entire college career!" It's a sentiment shared by many (and for a lucky few, a wish come true).

Corinne was an amazing friend and colleague. She took the Epicurean exhortation of "carpe diem" (seize the day) more seriously than anyone since Horace, and she made certain that her friends did too. Her passion for travel and adventure, for cuisine, for long walks in beautiful places, for summer afternoons at the pool, for a wide range of music and art, for tending her olive and lemon trees, and quiet evenings at home with her cats: all of these were part of her, and to spend time with Corinne was to spend time with a soul deeply attuned to the beauty and joy the world has to offer. Corinne never ceased wanting to learn, from Spanish irregular verbs to challenging piano pieces to a meditation technique that was new to her. She was a vibrant and beloved member of diverse social circles, meeting regularly with friends to taste wine, read and discuss great books, eat and discuss great meals, hike and explore new corners of her adopted Texas home, watch movies, cycle, practice yoga, lift weights, and dance Zumba. She was also profoundly concerned with helping others in the community, volunteering her language skills to help welcome Congolese asylum seekers. And she was a devoted friend to any feline lucky enough to cross her path, working enthusiastically with the Trinity Cat Alliance and her own brood of kitties, Oliver, Lenny and Jo.

Corinne is survived by family in Switzerland, including her mother, Mireille Dolay, and her brother, Phillipe Pache, as well as her nephew and niece, Bryan and Lea Pache. She was rich in her vast circle of loving friends, including Kathryn Slanski; George Syrimis; Tom Jenkins; Anna Stavrakopoulou; Adele Haft and Jordan Zinovich; Judith Norman; Lisa Jasinski and Patrick Keating; Tim O'Sullivan and Anadelia Romo; Bill and Barbara Sullivan; David Rando and Shannon Mariotti; Andrew Kania and Julie Post; Patti Hale; Julie LeBrun; Nicolle Hirschfeld; Alexander Beecroft and David Greven; Alison Marek; Sulochana Asirvatham; Stephen Colvin; Susanna Braund; Ronnie Ancona; Nicole Durish Gauthier; Corinne Béguin ; Katherine Wasdin; and many, many others.

A celebration of Corinne's life is planned for later this fall in San Antonio. In lieu of flowers, those who wish to donate in Corinne's honor may consider The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES), which provides aid and support to immigrant families; or the San Antonio Humane Society.

We all struggle with this senseless loss and take comfort in knowing that Corinne lived life to the brim -and taught so many to do likewise. Sit tibi terra levis: may the earth lie lightly upon you, Corinne. We remain in perpetual gratitude for your life, learning, and legacy."

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In an April 2020 post for Eidolon, I gathered predictions on “classics after coronavirus.” Two years later, it’s hard to believe all that’s changed — and all that’s stayed the same. Thanks to advocacy for more inclusive and global approaches to antiquity, the term “classics” can scarcely be used without scare quotes. Even the simple preposition “after” seems hopelessly outdated: we’re all learning to live and work alongside a virus that’s here to stay.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/13/2022 - 10:35am by .
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Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri Workshop

Where: Carleton University, Ottawa

When: July 6–8 2022

The College of the Humanities at Carleton University is partnering with the University of Manitoba to offer a three-day practical workshop on the Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri (DCLP) in Ottawa, July 6–8 2022.

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Mon, 04/11/2022 - 10:19am by .

The 2021-2022 SCS Nominating Committee, co-chaired by C.W. (Toph) Marshall and Patrice Rankine, has worked hard through the late Fall 2021 and early 2022. The Committee is pleased to present the complete slate of candidates for election in Summer 2022. All candidates listed below have agreed to stand. SCS will publish candidate statements in the early summer and online voting will begin as usual on or around August 1.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 04/08/2022 - 2:17pm by Helen Cullyer.
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The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 132 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. To date, it has funded projects in 28 states and 11 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

This post discusses four AnWoMoCo funded projects: an outreach program in CT called “Ancient Worlds in Our Community” (AWOC); a new adaptation of the Oresteia in Long Island; the publication of a book on Neoclassical influences on Chicago architecture; and Project Nota, a database of women Latin authors from all periods.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 04/08/2022 - 10:54am by .

The Politics of Archaism in the Imperial Period

An international colloquium at the University of Bristol (1 July 2022)

This colloquium is generously sponsored by the Institute of Greece, Rome, and the Classical Tradition, the University of Bristol, the Classical Association, and the Institute of Classical Studies. Its scope is to stimulate research on a crucial aspect of Roman Imperial culture, namely the widespread employment of archaism in Greek and Latin by the most authoritative intellectuals of the period, such as Dio of Prusa, Lucian of Samosata, Maximus of Tyre, and Aelius Aristides for Greek; Fronto, Apuleius, and Aulus Gellius for Latin.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 04/05/2022 - 1:13pm by .

The Department of Classics at UCLA is pleased to announce the following opportunity designed to advance the department's goals of diversity and inclusion. The department is offering a one-year tuition scholarship for our post-baccalaureate program in Classics for the academic year 2022-2023, designed to benefit a promising candidate for graduate work who needs an extra year of preparation in the ancient languages before applying to graduate programs in Classical Studies.  Members of groups who contribute to the University’s diversity—including members of groups that have been historically and are presently underrepresented in the academy (e.g., racial and ethnic minorities and individuals from low income backgrounds) are especially encouraged to apply. Applicants should have completed a bachelor’s program or equivalent in Classics or a related field and must be legally authorized to work/study in the United States at the time of submitting the application.  

 

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 04/05/2022 - 12:48pm by .
New Orleans

To submit to the SCS program committee, see the following link and deadlines:

The program submission system is now open: https://program.classicalstudies.org/

You must be a current SCS member to log into the system. To renew you membership or check your membership status, check our membership site.

The deadlines for submitting proposals and abstracts via the program submission system are:

  • Monday, April 25th, 2022 at 11.59pm EDT:

Panel, committee panel, workshop, seminar, and roundtable proposals.

Affiliated group reports, and already approved organizer-refereed reports.

New charter applications for affiliated groups, charter renewals for affiliated groups, and new organizer-refereed panel proposals for the 2024 meeting.

  • Monday, May 2nd, 2022 at 11.59pm EDT: 

Individual abstracts and lightning talk abstracts.

Committees, Affiliated Groups, and Organizer-refereeed Panels

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 04/05/2022 - 11:51am by Helen Cullyer.

The Classical Association of New England (CANE) invites you to this year's CANE Summer Institute, “Maiores a(n)d Posteriores: Imagining ‘classical antiquity’ into the future” on July 11-16, 2022. For the past several decades, CANE has offered a week-long program of mini-courses, professional development workshops, reading groups, and public lectures.

This summer, access to the institute will be offered in two formats: in person at Brown University (room and board options available) and online via CANE Zoom. Participants choose one format when registering. The mini-courses will be offered separately for in-person and online participants; workshops and reading groups will accommodate participants in both formats; public lectures will be in-person and live-streamed simultaneously. For information about this year’s offerings, including descriptions of our mini-courses, professional development workshops, reading groups, and public lectures, please visit www.caneweb.org/csi to link to the full program information and online registration option.

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Mon, 04/04/2022 - 11:22am by .

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.

AMPRAW 2022 will be held at Yale University from Thursday 3rd November to Saturday 5th November 2022, with the generous support of the Department of Classics at Yale University, the ARCHAIA program, and the Whitney Humanities Centre.

We anticipate holding this conference in a hybrid format. We hope that participants will be able to join us in person in New Haven, but will also allow remote access for both speakers and audience members.

This year’s theme is “Islands”. Possible topics may include, but need not be limited to, the following:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 3:44pm by .
Penn Public Lectures - Co-Creating Antiquities

Co-Creating Antiquities

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Featuring: Joy Connolly (President of the American Council of Learned Societies)

The Penn Public Lectures on Classical Antiquity and the Contemporary World aim to advance understanding of the many ways the past is put to use in building the present. They will be delivered by visionary scholars of ancient Greece and Rome, who will reimagine the role those ancient cultures have played over time in the building of later cultural forms, including the discipline of Classical Studies itself.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 1:24pm by .

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