Ph.D. Program in Analysis and Management of Cultural Heritage in Lucca, Italy

Applications are now being accepted for PhD students in Analysis and Management of Cultural Heritage (AMCH) for the 2015/16 PhD program at IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca (www.imtlucca.it).  Highly motivated candidates are invited to apply for one of the 35 fully-funded scholarships of the three-year doctoral program, which is articulated in curricula. The 3 curricula currently offered are field-specific, although in many instances they share a common scientific background.

The AMCH curriculum proposes courses in Management of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Institutions, European and International Legislation on Cultural Heritage and Landscape, Art History, Museology, Technologies applied to the valorization of Cultural Heritage. Both research oriented and practice oriented courses constitute the program, which aims at educating qualified professionals operating in the concrete field of cultural management and academics.  It promotes research offering the students a lively contact with different research approaches and methodologies, through case studies belonging to research fields such as Art History, Classical Archaeology and Museology.

The AMCH curriculum aims at providing prospective professionals operating in the field of management of culture and cultural heritage with specific know-hows. Prospective students should preferably have an undergraduate background in the Social Sciences, the Humanities and ICT related to Cultural Heritage.

All students are based in the newly restored San Francesco complex, a fully integrated campus in the historical center of the beautiful Tuscan city of Lucca. The campus includes residential facilities, including an on-site canteen, study and living rooms, and outdoor recreational spaces, all serving to add a cultural and social dimension to the professional experience of the doctoral program. Eligible students will also receive a research scholarship which amounts to approximately €13,600/year.

The PhD program at IMT attracts students from around the world, providing a truly international environment. English is the official language of the Institute. To further enhance the internationality of the program, all students have the opportunity to spend anywhere from 2-9 months abroad at a research institute or university, with the possibility of receiving additional financing through the Erasmus+ program.

To find out more about the institute, the requirements for admission and how to apply, please see www.imtlucca.it/phd.  The deadline for applications is June 29th 2015, 6 pm Italian time.

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Applications are available now online for the 2023/2024 Residential Grants and Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute in the following competitions:

  • Getty Scholar Grants
  • Pre- and Postdoctoral Fellowships

Applicants are invited to address one of the following future themes:

Art and Technology (Research Institute)

2023/2024

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/13/2022 - 10:22am by .
A nude, light-skinned man with a cloth tied around his waist sits inside a large, overturned pot holding a lantern. Four dogs sit outside the pot watching him. He sits in front of a large pedestal, behind which is a city scene.

At the end of every year, the National Language Resources Monitoring and Research Center in mainland China, an organization affiliated with the Chinese Ministry of Education, publishes a list of the most popular online words and phrases of the year. One entry in the 2021 list is tǎng píng (躺平), or “lying flat.” “Lying flat” denotes a posture both physical and political. It is a rejection of the “996” (9am–9pm, 6 days a week) work culture prevalent among China’s younger population. It is also a silent protest to widening income disparity, exorbitant housing costs in major cities, and the myth of a middle-class life.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/11/2022 - 2:47pm by .

The International Plato Society’s Symposium XIII will take place at the University of Georgia July 18-22.  The Symposium is entirely devoted to Plato’s Sophist.  It is hybrid with all papers simultaneously broadcast on Zoom.  A copy of the program is available on our site, Platosociety.org.

Remote and in-person registration are also available on our site.  You must be signed into the site in order to register.  Then, when you click on the “Register” button, are taken to a secure site at the University of Georgia.  Registration includes a copy of the published volume of selected papers.  All who are registered will be sent Zoom links on the morning on July 18.  Many of the papers that will be presented are posted and accessible to those who register.

If you have difficulties registering, try a different browser.  If that doesn’t work, contact us at webmaster@platosociety.org.

Athens, Georgia, the home of the University of Georgia, is quite a nice place, and we have arranged receptions every evening and a brief excursion.  Most of all, we have an excellent set of papers.

For more details and information click the link below:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 07/08/2022 - 2:13pm by .
Bronze statuette showing a smaller animal biting the leg of a horse, which stands above it.

This is a two-part blog post reflecting upon AAPI experiences in classical studies. Part 1 reflected upon the author’s personal experience teaching race & ethnicity in antiquity in the context of the ongoing surge of anti-Asian violence in the country. Part 2 reflects upon the shared experiences of students and scholars of Asian descent in classical studies through a series of interviews.

Curious about whether other people of Asian descent in Classical Studies have had experiences similar to mine and how that affects our lives in the field, I reached out this spring to scholars and students from other institutions in North America, public and private, large and small, through the recently formed Asian & Asian American Classical Caucus (AAACC).

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/08/2022 - 12:56pm by .

Call for Papers 
Saturday, February 18, 2023 
University of Florida (Gainesville, FL) 

Sixth University of Florida Classics Graduate Student Symposium 

Movement and Mobility in Ancient Spheres  
Mobility and movement, which lie at the core of the human experience in both ancient and modern societies, hold a critical place in the study of the ancient Greco-Roman world. From Herodotus’ wanderings around the Persian Empire to Pausanias’ Periegesis and Lucian’s fantastic travels, Greco- Roman literature captures the intertemporal need and desire of individuals and groups of people to move and travel from one place to another. We can wonder, for instance, at Odysseus’s journey across the Mediterranean, Aeneas’ Underworld katabasis, or Trimalchio’s social advancement while recognizing the multiple considerations of movement in these narratives and at the same time reflect on what sort of mobility allows for these stories to be transmitted to us over millennia. 
 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 07/06/2022 - 11:00am by .

Contributed by Hanna M. Roisman:

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 07/06/2022 - 8:48am by .
A Black woman with short hair posed as Venus in Boticelli's Birth of Venus. She stands on an open seashell in the sea, and her body is adorned with patches of gold. On the right, a dark-skinned hand coming out of a white blouse holds an orange tapestry.

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 132 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. To date, it has funded projects in 28 states and 11 countries, including Canada, the UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/01/2022 - 10:52am by .
A white marble stele featuring two standing women and two seated women. The central standing woman holds the hand of the central seated woman.

With weary hearts, we consider with you what Classics can do in the face of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the Supreme Court decision overruling Roe v. Wade (1973) and Planned Parenthood of Pennsylvania v. Casey (1992). We bring you what we can from our own experience: Amy Richlin spent the 1990s teaching half in Gender Studies in the aftermath of the Reagan-Bush administration, when Planned Parenthood v. Casey was heard, and also taught Roman women’s history and sometimes Roman law during her years at USC and UCLA. Bruce Frier has been on the Faculty of the Michigan Law School since 1986 and has participated in numerous discussions and debates concerning Constitutional interpretation; he also chaired a Provostal Committee to improve the campus climate for LGBTQ+ faculty, students, and staff.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 06/29/2022 - 10:50am by .
A dark painting featuring men in togas. A number of men in the center wearing white togas reach towards an older man, seated in a brown toga. As they extend arms towards him, he pushes them away and looks aside.

This two-part series reflects upon AAPI experiences in Classical Studies. Part 1 is catalyzed by the author’s personal experience teaching race & ethnicity in antiquity in the context of the ongoing surge of anti-Asian violence in the country. Part 2 will reflect upon the shared experiences of students and scholars of Asian descent in Classical Studies through a series of interviews.

“Do you know about your Penn Law School colleague Amy Wax?,” a friend texted me in January, as the semester was starting.

“Blocked it out,” I thumbed back. I had, in fact, dimly seen the news, but the idea that a professor at the same university where I was excited to be newly teaching might be publicly rejecting the civic fitness of Asian Americans like me had, frankly, been too much to contemplate. “Good mental health strategy,” my friend responded dryly.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/27/2022 - 9:05am by .
A black-and-white image of the reverse of a diadrachm of Magas, dated 300–275 BCE, depicting the silphium plant, with a small crab on the right side and Greek letters interspersed in the branches of the plant.

I guess I should say “thank you.” Gratias vobis ago. Thank you to the Republican Party’s long game, a partisan SCOTUS, years of deliberate Democratic avoidance. You see, I’ve been wanting for a while to write a book about social control, forced reproduction, and their effects on real people living under an authoritarian government. Of course, I was planning to write about Augustan Rome. But with the Court’s decision yesterday, ending nearly 50 years of Roe (that is, legal abortion in America), I’ve got a great reception study. And in real time.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 06/25/2022 - 1:39am by .

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