President Kathryn Gutzwiller Asks Members to Help in Promoting Friends of Classics

            The By-Laws of our organization, as written at its founding 145 years ago, specify that “any lover of philological studies may become a member of the Association” (article 18). Since that nineteenth-century statement was penned, much has changed for our organization. Early on, scholars of other languages decamped to form their own learned societies. As a result, the term “philological studies” gradually acquired a specialized reference to ancient Greek and Latin, and then over time to the expanded study of the Greeks and Romans in terms of literature, history, philosophy, and culture. Our impending name change to Society for Classical Studies aims to encode more accurately the current character of our organization, though always with recognition of our long history as the American Philological Association. What I want to point out, however, is that as the APA became increasingly a professional organization for academic classicists, one thing largely lost was the idea that its members were to be not just scholars of classical philology but more broadly its lovers. Plato might have called such people ἐρασταὶ τῆς φιλολογίας, but in searching for a twenty-first century equivalent of “lovers” the best terms I have found are “enthusiasts” or “friends.” It is to recapture these enthusiasts as members that, upon my proposal, the Board has created an associate membership known as Friends of Classics.

            Associate memberships are new to our organization. The Friends membership targets those who are not professional teachers or scholars of classics but do wish to have special access to information about the ancient world and contribute to our efforts to support a thriving climate for classical studies. The Board has also created a similar associate membership for K-12 teachers, designed for educators at those levels who do not require all the services offered to regular members. Of course the full range of professional benefits, including making a presentation at the annual meeting, using the Placement Service, and election to committees or voting, will be reserved for regular members. We do believe, however, that the benefits of a Friends membership will be attractive to many. These include Amphora, discounts on books, and participation in APA blogs, all at $35 a year (see the full list of benefits on the online signup site or the downloadable form). A special opportunity exists for Classics majors, who are eligible for a free one-year membership in Friends within the first two years after graduation. Our hope is that those majors who do not pursue an academic career in classics will nonetheless remain in touch with the field as Friends of our organization.

            To implement the Friends of Classics membership, Mary-Kay Gamel as Vice-President for Outreach and I are co-chairing a Making Friends Committee. We are grateful to the following for agreeing to serve on this committee:  Antony Augoustakis, Ward Briggs, Christopher Faraone, Joseph Farrell, Nancy Felson, Judith Hallett, Brooke Holmes, Alexander Loney, and Marilyn Skinner. So far we have undertaken to (1) find ways of identifying potential Friends so as to extend to them an invitation to join and (2) strategize about ways to enrich the Friends experience in the future.

            We believe that potential Friends easily number in the thousands. The most obvious group to solicit for membership are those who have studied Classics at some level, whether in high school, as Classics majors, or at the graduate level, and who remain passionate about antiquity while perhaps enjoying careers in other fields. The difficulty is to find them. Each of the members of the Making Friends Committee has provided the names of at least three persons who might wish to affiliate with our organization, and we have extended invitations to this initial group of potential members. In addition, we have written to chairs of Classics departments inviting them to give us the names of recent graduates (which we’re defining as those who received their degrees after December 2012) who qualify for a year’s free membership in this category. 

            We need your help as well. I call upon each of you as a member of our organization to notify us of three or more persons who you think would like to participate in this associate membership by sending their names with email or postal addresses to the APA Office (apastaff@sas.upenn.edu). If you are submitting the name of a recent undergraduate Classics major who is eligible for the one free year as a Friend of Classics described above, please be sure to communicate that. If you are involved with an organization, meeting group, or class to which you would like to distribute flyers about Friends, feel free to download and copy the one on our web site, or you may ask the APA office to send copies to you.

            The goal of these Friends memberships is to create an audience of enthusiasts with whom we may communicate about Classics and to establish a network of persons who support our initiatives. I am sure that I do not need to tell you how valuable a network like this can be in our ongoing efforts to advocate for Classics. The effort will only succeed, however, with the involvement of regular members. Please send in your names. I also invite you to communicate to me any suggestions and comments you may have on how to build the number of Friends and how to expand upon what we offer our new associate members. These suggestions will be added to the exciting ideas being generated by the Making Friends Committee for enhancing the benefits of becoming a Friend of Classics.

Kathryn Gutzwiller

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34th Biennial Conference of the Classical Association of South Africa

Order and Chaos

22 - 25 November 2023

University of Cape Town

FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 06/02/2022 - 7:53am by .
The University of Turin and the De Wulf-Mansion Centre for Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance Philosophy (Leuven) are glad to invite you to the conference "Providence and free will from the post-Hellenistic age to the Middle ages" that will take place in Turin on June 8th-10th
 
The conference will be held in person, but a connection will be made available for those who wish to attend online. To register, please write to filosofia.antica.to@gmail.com by Monday 6th
 
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 06/02/2022 - 7:21am by .
A stone sculpture of Sabina's head from the front. She has a subtle smile and wears a fillet on her hair, which is styled into an updo.

The portraits of Sabina represent a shift in the representation of imperial women in the Roman Empire. Sabina is the first empress to appear as the obverse portrait of a continuous coin production at Rome and the first woman to appear on all of the main denominations at the central mint. Her portraiture is also more varied than that of any previous empress. She is represented on imperial coinage with five different portrait types—i.e., modes of representation—most easily distinguished by hairstyle, all of which are depicted below. This is matched by an increased presence of Sabina’s portraits in provincial coinage and sculpture. This greater visual prominence for the Empress set a new standard that was followed by subsequent administrations, making the portraits of Sabina an integral corpus in the history of Roman imperial portraiture.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 05/31/2022 - 10:45am by .

Posted on behalf of the conference oraganizers

We are organizing an international e-conference entitled “Archaeology of Izmir-Smyrna” that will take place on November 17-18, 2022 on Zoom.us. We warmly invite contributions by scholars and graduate students from a variety of disciplines of ancient studies related to these objects. The video conference is free of charge. We would be delighted, if you could consider contributing to our e-conference and contact us with the required information before September 9, 2022. Our e-mail address is: alevcetingoz@gmail.com

We kindly request that you alert any persons within your research community who would be interested in participating at this e-conference, either by forwarding our e-mail through Academia, Researchgate, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or other similar social media, or by printing this circular or poster and displaying it in your institution. We hope that you will be able to join us on Zoom, and look forward to seeing you in May 2022!

Click Here for the full description and requirements:
/sites/default/files/userfiles/files/1_%20DEU%20Sempozyumu%20Birinci%20Sirkuler%20Ingilizce.doc

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 05/31/2022 - 9:29am by .
A pink flyer titled "A Conversation with Luis Alfaro." Shows a hand holding up an illustration of a theater, with images of theater lights behind it.

I first met Luis Alfaro at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, where he delivered a deeply moving keynote address in which he discussed his adaptations of Greek tragedies and how his plays have brought reimagined ancient stories to new audiences, to provoke social change. This profoundly important event was made possible by a partnership with my former employer, the Onassis Foundation USA, the Classics and Social Justice affiliated group, and the SCS. As many of us will recall, this conference was also marred by the ugliness of racism, which reared its awful head amid an already tense, ongoing conversation about the state and future of our field that has since spilled into the wider public discourse, perhaps for the worse. But there is hope, and I sincerely believe that Alfaro’s work can be one of those mechanisms of change, if only our field would embrace it.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 05/27/2022 - 12:36pm by Young Richard Kim.
CANE logo showing New England state and green wreath

Monday, July 11 through Saturday, July 16, 2022

This year, the CANE Summer Institute will run simultaneously in two modes: in person at Brown University and virtually via CANE Zoom

  • Mini-courses will be offered separately for in-person and virtual participants
  • Professional development workshops and Greek & Latin reading groups will be shared by all participants
  • Lectures will be free and open to the public, both in person and via livestream on Zoom

Sponsored by: Classical Association of New England, Brown University Department of Classics, and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Register online by clicking here

See the full program and learn about the mini-courses

Regular registration runs through June 1
Late registrations accepted through June 15

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 05/25/2022 - 10:42am by Helen Cullyer.

Performing Ancient Greek Literature in a Time of Pandemic

Conference

23-24 June 2022

Organizers: Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand) and Barbara Goff (University of Reading, UK) 

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 05/25/2022 - 8:16am by .
 A neoclassical, Beaux-Arts-style building with columns in front. In front of it is a green lawn.

Our seventh interview in the Contingent Faculty Series is a virtual conversation between Dr. Taylor Coughlan and Dr. Victoria Austen.

Victoria Austen received her Ph.D. from King’s College London in 2020 and has been teaching at the University of Winnipeg since 2019. In September 2022, she will begin a two-year position at Carleton College, in Minnesota, as the Oden Postdoctoral Fellow in Innovation in the Humanities (Classics). Her main research focuses on the imaginative space of Roman gardens and landscapes across literature and art from the Late Republic and Early Empire; she is also interested in classical reception (particularly related to myth) and the study of race and ethnicity in the ancient world. She is the social media manager for Peopling the Past (@peoplingthepast), and you can also find her tweeting @Vicky_Austen.

Taylor Coughlan: You received your education and training in the UK, and moved to Canada to begin your professional career, and have a further move to the U.S. on the horizon. What have you learned from working in different cities and countries?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/23/2022 - 10:07am by .
Newspaper

The SAGP Board has decided that the 2022 Annual Meeting will again occur via Zoom. This makes it possible to stretch out the time-frame so that we do not have simultaneous panels. We will schedule panels on weekends, Friday through Monday (avoiding Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, since those are the heaviest teaching days for most people). We will schedule starting September 23, and ending November 19, for this round.

Members of the Society are invited to propose Zoom panels. Organizers should specify the topic of the panel, the proposed speakers (with academic affiliation and email address) and tentative title (check with them first!), and preferred date (and an alternate). Some preference for organizers who would be able to host a zoom event themselves.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 05/20/2022 - 8:40am by .

Call for Papers

Sapiens Ubique Civis IX – Szeged 2022

PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity

Szeged, Hungary, August 31–September 2, 2022

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 05/13/2022 - 10:47am by .

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