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Public Statement from the SCS Board of Directors

The mission of the Society for Classical Studies is “to advance knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the ancient Greek and Roman world and its enduring value.” That world was a complex place, with a vast diversity of peoples, languages, religions, and cultures spread over three continents, as full of contention and difference as our world is today.  Greek and Roman culture was shared and shaped for their own purposes by people living from India to Britain and from Germany to Ethiopia. Its medieval and modern influence is wider still. Classical Studies today belongs to all of humanity.

For this reason, the Society strongly supports efforts to include all groups among those who study and teach the ancient world, and to encourage understanding of antiquity by all. It vigorously and unequivocally opposes any attempt to distort the diverse realities of the Greek and Roman world by enlisting the Classics in the service of ideologies of exclusion, whether based on race, color, national origin, gender, or any other criterion. As scholars and teachers, we condemn the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization. 

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The Prophecy of Calchas from a set of The Story of Troy

There are many definitions for the Digital Humanities—some wonder whether it is, in fact, a distinct field at all. My mind tends to operate at a pragmatic level and I have a very simple way of thinking about the question: in the Digital Humanities we think about what contributions we as humanists can make to a world where an increasing, if not a predominant, amount of human thought circulates through digital media: texts, sounds and images on our smartphones, video-conferencing and texting instead of simple voice communication, digital libraries of texts that support new forms of reading, new forms of representing human ideas and experience—everything is changing and nothing will be the same. And yet the big questions remain the same. The big question is not what we think about the Digital Humanities but what we think about the Humanities in a digital age. Why do we study the Humanities at all? I actually think it would be more appropriate to speak of the “Print Humanities” to distinguish the practices of print culture from the Humanities as they are evolving today.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/27/2017 - 12:00am by Gregory R Crane.

Between nostos and exilium: "home" in on-screen representations of the ancient Mediterranean world and its narratives

An area of multiple panels for the 2017 Film & History Conference:

"Representing Home: The Real and Imagined Spaces of Belonging"

The Hilton, Milwaukee City Center, Milwaukee, WI (USA)
November 1-5, 2017
DEADLINE for abstracts: June 1, 2017 (early deadline); July 1, 2017 (general deadline)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 03/24/2017 - 3:28pm by Erik Shell.

Opportunities to volunteer for SCS Committees and elected offices are now available to members.  Committee appointments will begin in 2018 and elected offices in 2019:

Read about what each committee does

Go straight to the volunteer page to download the form

We rely on the work of volunteers to direct the Society's policies and collaborate with SCS staff in implementing programs that are important for our members and the field as a whole. Member participation is, and always will be, an impactful part of that effort.  

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:43am by Erik Shell.

Andromache Karanika will officially become the Editor of TAPA in January 2018, but will handle incoming submissions effective immediately.

Please send all submissions electronically to tapa@uci.edu, following TAPA guidelines. Craig Gibson will remain the official Editor through 2017 and is in charge of producing this year's issues (147.1 and 2).

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 03/21/2017 - 8:04am by Erik Shell.

Kenchreai

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions. All links are active, however, some information such as pricing may have changed.

As the tools and methods for creating 3D models of sites and objects become less expensive, archaeologists are increasingly putting them to good use in the field. This article focuses on my collaborative work to scan objects found at the site of Kenchreai in Greece and now stored nearby in the Isthmia Museum. It does cover practical issues and one goal of writing this piece is to encourage others to explore the creation of 3D content. Accordingly, I stress that 3D tools are becoming easier to use, not just less expensive. And it will be as important to think about what to do with these models after they are made. Permanent access to 3D models is a goal and initial steps towards that are described below. Likewise, rich linking of information about scanned objects to descriptions of their original archaeological findspot will further encourage contextualized studies of Greek and Roman material culture.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/20/2017 - 1:00am by Sebastian Heath.

This message is intended for members in the US.  Yesterday, President Trump’s budget blueprint was published.  It calls for the elimination of many crucial educational and cultural agencies including the NEH, NEA, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and Institute of Museum of Library Services (IMLS). 

A brief survey of grants made by the NEH over the last seven years shows the potential impact on our field.  The NEH has funded:

-          Numerous research fellowships for individual scholars as well as the SCS-administered TLL Fellowship and the fellowship program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

-          Digitization, publication, and editing of ancient coins, inscriptions, and papyri.

-          Projects that explore the use of computational methods for analyzing ancient texts.

-          Archaeological projects from Italy to Jordan.

-          Initiatives run by the Aquila Theatre Company, Inc., state humanities councils, and scholars that are engaging veterans and members of the public in discussion and performance of ancient works that speak to modern experiences of war.

-          Seminars on ancient literature, philosophy, and material culture for faculty in the higher education and K-12 sectors.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Fri, 03/17/2017 - 8:44am by Helen Cullyer.

After a temporary 30% discount, Oxford University Press has permanently increased its discount on all Classics titles for SCS Members to 25% off, up from 20% previously. OUP has also added a new, 30% discount subscription to the Oxford Classical Dictionary, an exclusive benefit for SCS members only.

Both of these benefits are available to SCS members on the "Members Only" page after signing in.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.

Roman Cultural Memory

Sao Paulo, Brazil 7th-9th March 2018

A series of three conferences will explore the impact of the bourgeoning field of memory studies on the study of Latin Literature and Culture.

The first conference at King's College London (Nov. 2016) has focused on cultural memory in the Roman Republic.
The second conference at Paris (June 2017) will look at Augustan cultural memory and the third conference in Sao Paulo (March 2018) will concentrate on cultural memory under the Roman Empire.

We are inviting submissions of abstracts for the third session in Sao Paulo, Brazil (7th - 9th March 2018). Papers will focus on cultural memory under the Roman Empire (i.e. post-Augustan)

For a full description of the project please visit the conference website

https://sites.google.com/site/romanculturalmemory/project-description

confirmed key note speakers:
Bettina Reitz-Joosse (Groningen), James Uden (Boston), Christopher Whitton (Cambridge)

confirmed participants:
Alain Gowing (University of Washington, Seattle)

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be send to
romeculturalmemory@gmail.com
by the deadline 31st May 2017.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 10:01am by Erik Shell.

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 9:25am by Erik Shell.

Rosetta Stone By © Hans Hillewaert, CC BY-SA 4.0

Arrival has gotten serious buzz in academic circles, and for good reason. The premise of the film is the idea that the language you speak shapes the kind of thoughts you can have. Formally, that idea is called the “linguistic relativity hypothesis” or Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, and the film thus brings one of the more controversial and intriguing theories in the scholarly study of language before the popular imagination. It is an idea that could fundamentally change what we think we know about the ancient world.

In the film Amy Adams portrays linguistics professor Louise Banks, a demoralized expert in phonemic analysis, tasked with deciphering an alien language. The Heptapods’ language possesses a peculiar written form; they “write” a single splotchy circle, which can convey anything from a simple idea like a name to more complex combinations of concepts (what we might think of as a sentence). As Dr. Banks deciphers more and more of this “circular” writing system, she begins to perceive and experience time in a wholly new way.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 1:00am by William Michael Short.

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SCS Announcements
Please be aware that the deadline for individual abstracts for the 2018 annua
Calls for Papers
THE IMPACT OF LEARNING GREEK, HEBREW, AND ‘ORIENTAL’ LANGUAGES ON SCH
Awards and Fellowships
We are delighted to announce the following winners of the 2017 Pedagogy Award
Awards and Fellowships
Donald Mastronarde, SCS Member and Vice President for Publications and Resear

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