Public Statement from the SCS Board of Directors

The mission of the Society for Classical Studies is “to advance knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the ancient Greek and Roman world and its enduring value.” That world was a complex place, with a vast diversity of peoples, languages, religions, and cultures spread over three continents, as full of contention and difference as our world is today.  Greek and Roman culture was shared and shaped for their own purposes by people living from India to Britain and from Germany to Ethiopia. Its medieval and modern influence is wider still. Classical Studies today belongs to all of humanity.

For this reason, the Society strongly supports efforts to include all groups among those who study and teach the ancient world, and to encourage understanding of antiquity by all. It vigorously and unequivocally opposes any attempt to distort the diverse realities of the Greek and Roman world by enlisting the Classics in the service of ideologies of exclusion, whether based on race, color, national origin, gender, or any other criterion. As scholars and teachers, we condemn the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization. 

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Re-imagining the Greeks: Contemporary and Cross-cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy

Conference at Amherst College

The Theater and Dance Department at Amherst College will host a three-day international conference, Re-imagining the Greeks: Contemporary and Cross-cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy, in Holden Theater March 23-25, 2017.

Each day will be devoted to a different region/culture around the world, and its cross-cultural approach to plays from ancient Greece. The first day will be about Japanese adaptations, the second about Black interpretations (African and American), and the third about American adaptations. The conference will combine scholarly discussions, workshops based on non-western performative approaches, and live performances.

“In the past few decades, we have witnessed a worldwide trend of adapting and re-imagining ancient Greek plays,” says Yagil Eliraz, organizer of the conference. “These cross-cultural approaches prove that Greek tragedy is a universal resource, and not the exclusive property and cradle of the West. The conference will offer the opportunity to focus on the performative aspects of these contemporary adaptations, and will bring together scholars and practitioners from various disciplines.”

Conference highlights

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 03/08/2017 - 2:13pm by Erik Shell.

2017-18 Fellowship Winners

The TLL Fellowship has been awarded to Elizabeth Palazzolo (PhD, University of Pennsylvania).

The recipient of the Lionel Pearson Fellowship is Peggy Xu (University of Chicago), who has been admitted to the MPhil program in Classics at the University of Cambridge.

The Coffin Fellowship has been awarded to Maegen Cooper, Latin teacher at Columbia Independent School in Columbia, Missouri.  Maegen will attend the Paideia Institute's Living Caesar in Gaul program this summer.

Congratulations to our fellowship recipients and many thanks to the selection committees for their hard work!

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 03/08/2017 - 8:36am by Erik Shell.

Performing Problem Plays

CAMP Panel, 2018 SCS Meetings in Boston

Organizers: James F. Patterson (james_patterson@utexas.edu) and Michael Mignanelli (mmignanelli@utexas.edu)

From comic elements and happy endings in Euripides to potential mass murder in Aristophanes’ Clouds (Kopff) and rape in Terence, problematic scenes in plays challenge generic categorization. In turn, prescribed dramatic conventions and generic constraints lead to the belief that, for instance, Seneca’s Oedipus simply could not have been performed (Hutchinson, Fitch). Meanwhile, logical inconsistencies in dialogue and narrative discontinuities encourage textual emendation: Willink, for instance, excises Orestes 554 on the grounds that the line “contributes nothing to, indeed gratuitously weakens, Or[estes]’ argument” (175), and Rutenberg removes the choruses from his adaptation of Seneca’s Oedipus because they “tend to hold up the action” (14). But perhaps these and other problems are not inherent in plays. Perhaps, instead, they derive from preconceived notions about how drama should and should not work. Perhaps, then, these problems may be resolved if performance, rather than theory, guides interpretation.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 03/03/2017 - 8:24am by Erik Shell.

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library will host the

20th colloquium of the Comité international de paléographie latine on 6-8 September 2017


"Scribes and the Presentation of Texts (from Antiquity to ca. 1550)
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The list of speakers for the conference can be found at this link (click here and go to "Programme").

The Colloquium will be followed by an optional trip to the medieval collections at The Cloisters in New York City.


Hotel rooms for the conference can now be reserved at the New Haven Hotel or the Courtyard by Marriott.

Information to book accommodations at the New Haven Hotel: contact the reservations line at 1-800-644-6835 reference the group code “Comité international de paléographie latine (CIPL)” in order to receive the group rate. This code will not be valid for online bookings and can only be used through central reservations line listed above.

Information to book accommodations at the Courtyard by Marriott please follow this link.

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 03/01/2017 - 8:57am by Erik Shell.

Panel: Lingua Francas of Knowledge

Convenor: Karen Bennett, Universidade Nova, Lisbon

English is today the unrivalled vehicle for the transmission of knowledge, the language in which most scholarship is published, conferences are held, reading is done and lessons taught. However, its rise to prominence is a relatively recent development in the broad sweep of human history. From the middle of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th, English, French and German enjoyed a roughly equal status as languages of scientific publication, with others, such as Russian and Japanese, occupying niches in particular geographic areas. In the Medieval and Early Modern period, Latin was of course the lingua franca (LF) of learning, once so indispensable that it had to be mastered before any formal education could take place; and before that the prime position was held by Greek, the koiné of the Hellenistic world. Meanwhile, in the East, Arabic, Sanskrit and Chinese were also playing formidable roles in channelling learning through the centuries.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/01/2017 - 8:54am by Erik Shell.

SENSORIUM:

Sensory Perceptions in Roman Polytheism

Madrid, 16-18 November de 2017

The Institute of Historiography “Julio Caro Baroja”, at the University of Carlos III of Madrid is organizing an international conference titled, “SENSORIUM: Sensory Perceptions in Roman Polytheism.” Researchers of ancient history, religious history, archeology, anthropology, classical literature, and other related disciplines, are invited to present their research relating to the poly-sensorial practice of religion in the Roman world.

Since M. Maussand Merleau-Ponty’s publications about the role of the body in social interactions during the first half of the twentieth century (Mauss 1934; Merleau-Ponty 1945), studies about embodiment have benefited from a considerable amount of success since the 1990s in anthropology (Çsordas 1994, 2008), philosophy (Haraway 1991), semiotics (Landowski 2005, Fusaroli, Demuru et al. 2009) and cognitive linguistics (Geeraerts&Cuyckens 2007). The paradigm of embodiment considers that the body is no longer a mere object that reproduces culture, but an ontological condition for the existence of culture itself.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/28/2017 - 1:56pm by Erik Shell.

The journal Phasis – Greek and Roman Studies is published by the Institute of Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia. Phasis is a peer-reviewed academic journal and publishes original contributions in all areas of Greek and Roman Studies.

The journal invites papers for the forthcoming issue. Papers may be submitted in English, French or German. They should be no less than 5 000 words in length (not incl. footnotes and bibliography) and should be preceded by an abstract of 100-250 words in English. Please use a Unicode font for Greek. Each submission will be reviewed by two anonymous external reviewers.

If you are interested in publishing in Phasis, please send your article and abstract to phasis@tsu.ge by March 15, 2017, and include your name, address and affiliation in the accompanying email.

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.
 

Tamara Cheishvili

Managing Editor

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/28/2017 - 12:29pm by Erik Shell.
Erleichterte Griechische Grammatica Oder Gründliche Anführung Zur Griechischen S frontispiece.jpg

Co-authored with Vanessa Gorman, Professor of History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. vgorman1@unl.edu 

How many times have you stood in a classroom, trying to figure out a way to diagram coherently a Latin or Greek sentence on the board in order to clarify a structure that is baffling your students? Why not do the same thing digitally, and even require the students to construct their own sentence trees to demonstrate their understanding of the problem? A few years ago, we learned about a program to do just that. Arethusa is a set of tools developed by the Alpheios Project, adopted by the Perseus Digital Library, and delivered by the Perseids editing platform. We began using these syntactic trees in my advanced Latin classroom and were so pleased with the results that we soon introduced them to classes at all levels, from the second week of Latin 1 to the research capstone for majors.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/27/2017 - 12:00am by Robert Gorman.

We are delighted to welcome Cherane Ali as our new Director of Meetings.  Cherane has a BA from Baruch College and extensive meeting planning experience in both the US and Europe.  

We also thank the Nominating Committee for their work throughout the Fall and Winter to identify a slate of candidates who will stand for election in summer 2017.  You can view the complete slate here.

As a reminder, members will also be asked to vote this summer on a revision to the Working Conditions section of the Society's Professional Ethics Statement.  You can view the revised draft of the section here.  Comments on the draft should be sent to the Executive Director by March 1.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 02/26/2017 - 8:25pm by Helen Cullyer.

Today we celebrate the SCS 50-year Club.  Members who joined in 1967 have now been added to our list of 50-year members:

https://classicalstudies.org/membership/scs-50-year-club

Thank you to all on this list for your teaching, scholarship, service, and support.  

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 02/23/2017 - 9:17pm by Helen Cullyer.

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