SCS Board Resolution on Abstract Publication

Resolution approved by the Board of Directors of the SCS, Jan. 6, 2019

The SCS Board of Directors approved the following recommendation at its meeting on January 6, 2019. It will be communicated to journal editors and to classics editors at relevant presses, that is, those whose publications fall under the responsibility of the American Office. We will also investigate whether the recommendation can be more widely discussed and adopted.

Board Resolution

In view of the ever-growing number of articles and chapters in collective volumes that the American Office for L’Année philologique is responsible for processing, it is the strong recommendation of the SCS that journal and volume editors regard it as a best practice and a routine adjunct of the publication process that each article or chapter be accompanied by a brief abstract and a list of keywords.

To ensure the utility of abstracts and keywords for the efficient compilation of data for APh, please take note of the following guidelines:

1. The abstract should give a concise but informative summary of the article’s or chapter’s content, indicating important points of argumentation and main conclusions.

2. The abstract should refer to the types of evidence adduced in drawing these conclusions, and give specific information about the most important items.

  • literary: cite the author or genre, and if an author, cite the works discussed and the most significant passages (The recommended abbreviations of Greek works are as in LSJ or DGE [http://www.filol.csic.es/dge/lst/2lst1.htm], and of Latin works as in TLL.)
  • epigraphical:  cite the most significant inscriptions
  • papyrological: cite the papyri (for the standard abbreviations, use the Checklist at http://papyri.info/docs/checklist)
  • artistic: cite the significant pieces, remembering to include museum inventory numbers
  • manuscript evidence: cite the library and shelfmark
  • archaeological: include the name of the sponsoring institution and the nature of the evidence (such as field report)

3. Abstract and keywords should be provided under a Creative Commons license.

Reasoning for this Resolution

Over the past couple of years, the SCS Board of Directors and its Advisory Board on the American Office of L’Année philologique has been following the progress of the transition of the classical bibliographic database to a new publisher and provider of online access, namely Brepols. This change came about because SIBC (Société Internationale de Bibliographie Classique) found it necessary to make new arrangements since the previous platform could no longer be sustained.

This transition has been a source of uncertainty for at least two reasons. First, the different pricing structure used by Brepols has made it unclear for the moment how many old subscribers have maintained their subscriptions or how many new subscribers have been acquired. Second, changes both in the level of projected revenue to be shared among local offices and in the terms governing the royalties to SCS for the data that was originally developed by the Database of Classical Bibliography have made it likely that these sources will provide less support than previously toward the budget of the American Office. The actual decrease, if any, will not be clear until the effects of the transition are fully understood in the next year or two.

The other important aspect of the transition has been the change in workflow for the bibliographers at the local offices. Initially, productivity was, as expected, reduced somewhat as people were learning the new system, but now productivity is normal once more. Brepols is experimenting with technological solutions that could one day improve productivity, but these efforts are still embryonic. Brepols also wants to improve the online database by encouraging the bibliographers to enter more keywords for piece.

Meanwhile, the amount of material that would ideally be covered in the database keeps growing year by year. The American Office is responsible for journals and numerous collective volumes originating in English-speaking countries, and some from elsewhere. Some journals and edited volumes already publish abstracts of their articles, and these abstracts are often a great help to the bibliographers, since a good abstract significantly shortens the time a bibliographer needs to devote to the associated article or chapter. The Advisory Board concluded that one way to help the personnel of the American Office meet the challenge of the ever-increasing material is to recommend that the practice of including abstracts (and keywords) be much more widely adopted and that the usefulness of abstracts be promoted by giving guidance about what will smooth the workflow for the bibliographers. The recommendation includes the notion that abstracts ought to be provided with a Creative Commons license, since the point of the abstract is to inform potential readers and attract them to the full article, not to earn revenue through the assertion of copyright restrictions.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The homepage of Alpheios

Alpheios Reading Tools (henceforth Alpheios) is an open-source web extension that allows users to access information about Greek, Latin, Classical Arabic, or Persian text on any web page. After enabling the extension in Chrome, Safari, or Firefox, you simply double-click on any word on any page to see definitions, morphology, usages, and grammatical information. 

Figure 1: Alpheios Reading Tools integrates fluidly with the online Loeb Classical Library.
Figure 1: Alpheios Reading Tools integrates fluidly with the online Loeb Classical Library.

As an avid user of Alpheios in my capacities as both a Ph.D. student and instructor, I jumped at the chance to speak with Harry Diakoff and Bridget Almas, two of the founding members of Alpheios. Harry Diakoff is currently the president of the board of The Alpheios Project, Ltd., which is a registered 501(c); Bridget Almas is the Executive director and Chief Software Architect for the project.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/05/2021 - 10:18am by .

The conference "Contact, Colonialism, and Comparison" will take place over Zoom April 16-17, 2021. Please visit the event page here for further information, including a tentative schedule and list of participants. Conference papers are being made available to participants in advance, and sessions during the event itself will begin with an introductory contribution from a respondent followed by a brief author response and then open discussion. If you'd like to register for the conference, please fill out this online registration form to receive access to the papers as well as a Zoom link closer to the date.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/05/2021 - 7:49am by Erik Shell.

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.
AMPRAW 2021 will be held at Columbia University in the City of New York (USA) from Thursday, November 11 to Saturday, November 13, 2021, in collaboration with the Department of Classics at Columbia University, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Columbia University Libraries Journals.
Due to the unpredictability caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are not yet able to confirm that the conference will take place in person. We hope that this will be possible; however, we are also making plans to accommodate a hybrid or online-only event. We will keep you updated as the situation evolves. Please be aware that, if the conference will be in person, we are unable to guarantee travel reimbursements to speakers, but we might be able to offer support on a need basis.
 

Confirmed keynote speaker:
Dr. Patrice Rankine (University of Richmond, Virginia)
 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 03/30/2021 - 12:25pm by Erik Shell.

Chères et chers collègues,

L’appel à communication pour les sections parallèles du prochain congrès international d’épigraphie grecque et latine est toujours en cours, jusqu’au 30 mars 2021. Vous trouverez sur le site du congrès (https://ciegl2022.sciencesconf.org/) la liste de ces sections. Nous rappelons que l’appel à communications ne vaut que pour les sections parallèles et en aucun cas pour les sessions plénières, qui seront constituées d’un rapport et n’accueillent pas de communications.

Les propositions de communications doivent être envoyées à cette adresse : ciegl2022@sciencesconf.org. L’argumentaire les accompagnant peut être formulé dans une des cinq langues du congrès, allemand, anglais, français, espagnol et italien.

Vous pouvez toujours vous abonner à la liste de diffusion :

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/29/2021 - 2:09pm by Erik Shell.
Dr. Rock-McCutcheon and the cast of Antigone for Arts Day 2019 at Wilson College. Image courtesy of Bonnie Rock-McCutcheon.

Our fourth interview in the Contingent Faculty Series is a virtual conversation between Joshua Nudell and Dr. Bonnie Rock-McCutcheon. Dr. Rock-McCutcheon received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, where she wrote a dissertation on the role of spectacle in gifts to Delian Apollo in the Archaic period, before becoming a Lecturer of Classics at Wilson College in Chambersburg, PA. Her current research focuses on sociality with the gods, the role of gender in myth, and the use of graphic novels in the classroom. She was recently featured in an episode of the Creators Unite podcast, talking about her experiences using comic books and graphic novels in the classroom. When not teaching a wide range of courses for both the history and classics programs, Dr. Rock-McCutcheon spends time with her three cats and quilting.

Joshua Nudell: When we talk career pathways, there is, at least in theory, a formula for how one lands a tenure-track job, but less discussion of how one makes a path as a contingent faculty member. What was your journey into your current position?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/29/2021 - 11:41am by .
Header image: Gold death-mask, known as the ‘mask of Agamemnon’. Mycenae, Grave Circle A, Grave V, 16th cent. BC. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, in March 2021 has been renamed and reimagined as the Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative. Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities supports projects that seek to engage broader publics—individuals, groups, and communities—in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 98 projects ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. Awardees are selected by the SCS Committee on Classics in the Community.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/26/2021 - 10:01am by .

Last week, several members of the SCS Board of Directors participated in a powerful and important solidarity event organized by the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) and Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus (AAACC) after the shootings in Atlanta that resulted in the deaths of eight individuals, six of whom were Asian women. After this event, we reached out to AAACC to ask what actions SCS could meaningfully take to support the AAACC community and AAPI communities more broadly. As a result, the SCS Board of Directors has approved donations to the Asian Counseling and Referring Service and Asian Americans Advancing Justice. SCS will also be working with AAACC on data collection in order to understand better the demographics and needs of Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander classicists.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 03/26/2021 - 8:45am by Helen Cullyer.

Awards and Fellowships: Spring 2021

We congratulate the following award and fellowship winners for 2021:

Frank M. Snowden Scholarships

  • Cayle Diefenbach
  • Maia Lee-Chin
  • Niles Marthone
  • Luis Rodriguez Perez
  • Coffin Fellowship
  • Robert Amstutz

Pearson Fellowship

  • Uwade Akhere

TLL Fellowship

  • Adam Trettel

Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities Awards (formerly Classics Everywhere)

  • New Atlantis: A Journey into the Classicism of W.E.B. Du Bois – Pennsylvania

                Divya Nair

  • Classics as Pedagogical Tool: An Interactive/Multimedia E-Book – online

                Marcus Bell and Nancy Rabinowitz

  • A Musical Adaptation of The Bacchae – online

                J. Landon Marcus

  • All BAME Medea: A Short Film – U.K.

                Shivaike Shah

  • The Ozymandias Project: A New Podcast – Illinois, online

                Lexie Henning

  • The Laodamiad at the Center for Hellenic Studies – Washington, DC, online

                Chas LiBretto

  • Society for Ancient Medicine Blog Series: “The Best Doctor is also a Historian” – online

                Colin Webster

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 03/23/2021 - 11:26am by Erik Shell.

The Inaugural SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecture

The AIA’s Student Affairs Interest Group (SAIG) and SCS’s Graduate Student Committee (GSC) are pleased to announce the 2021 SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecture! This annual talk is a collaborative effort intended to highlight the work of a senior doctoral candidate whose research features interdisciplinary work between the fields of archaeology and classical philology, and to support the student networks between these related fields.

As the first SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecturer, Elizabeth Heintges, doctoral candidate at Columbia University, will present “Forgetting Sextus Pompey: the bellum Siculum and Vergil’s Aeneid,” integrating both literary and material evidence into an analysis of two major moments in Roman Republican history. Please see the poster and abstract below for more details.

The lecture will be held virtually on Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 5:00 pm EST.
Please register here in advance of this Zoom webinar.
Any questions? Please don’t hesitate to reach out via email (studentaffairsaia@gmail.com).

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/23/2021 - 10:50am by Erik Shell.

The past few weeks, and indeed the past few months and the past year, have been incredibly difficult in so many ways. The pandemic, the increasingly uncertain financial state of higher education and the humanities in particular, and the persistence of hate and racism are resulting in serious practical and emotional impacts. As SCS strives to address all these challenges and to serve its members, we are introducing a new experimental program of "office hours" that will provide members with short confidential Zoom appointments with the Executive Director to air concerns and make requests. At the current time, appointments are limited to members who are students, contingent faculty, and anyone with precarious or no employment. You can find the link to schedule an appointment in the body of the March email newsletter and on our Members Only page accessible via our Membership menu (login is required to access that page).

View full article. | Posted in Executive Director Letters on Mon, 03/22/2021 - 11:38am by Helen Cullyer.

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