SCS Board Resolution on Abstract Publication

Resolution approved by the Board of Directors of the SCS, Jan. 6, 2019

The SCS Board of Directors approved the following recommendation at its meeting on January 6, 2019. It will be communicated to journal editors and to classics editors at relevant presses, that is, those whose publications fall under the responsibility of the American Office. We will also investigate whether the recommendation can be more widely discussed and adopted.

Board Resolution

In view of the ever-growing number of articles and chapters in collective volumes that the American Office for L’Année philologique is responsible for processing, it is the strong recommendation of the SCS that journal and volume editors regard it as a best practice and a routine adjunct of the publication process that each article or chapter be accompanied by a brief abstract and a list of keywords.

To ensure the utility of abstracts and keywords for the efficient compilation of data for APh, please take note of the following guidelines:

1. The abstract should give a concise but informative summary of the article’s or chapter’s content, indicating important points of argumentation and main conclusions.

2. The abstract should refer to the types of evidence adduced in drawing these conclusions, and give specific information about the most important items.

  • literary: cite the author or genre, and if an author, cite the works discussed and the most significant passages (The recommended abbreviations of Greek works are as in LSJ or DGE [http://www.filol.csic.es/dge/lst/2lst1.htm], and of Latin works as in TLL.)
  • epigraphical:  cite the most significant inscriptions
  • papyrological: cite the papyri (for the standard abbreviations, use the Checklist at http://papyri.info/docs/checklist)
  • artistic: cite the significant pieces, remembering to include museum inventory numbers
  • manuscript evidence: cite the library and shelfmark
  • archaeological: include the name of the sponsoring institution and the nature of the evidence (such as field report)

3. Abstract and keywords should be provided under a Creative Commons license.

Reasoning for this Resolution

Over the past couple of years, the SCS Board of Directors and its Advisory Board on the American Office of L’Année philologique has been following the progress of the transition of the classical bibliographic database to a new publisher and provider of online access, namely Brepols. This change came about because SIBC (Société Internationale de Bibliographie Classique) found it necessary to make new arrangements since the previous platform could no longer be sustained.

This transition has been a source of uncertainty for at least two reasons. First, the different pricing structure used by Brepols has made it unclear for the moment how many old subscribers have maintained their subscriptions or how many new subscribers have been acquired. Second, changes both in the level of projected revenue to be shared among local offices and in the terms governing the royalties to SCS for the data that was originally developed by the Database of Classical Bibliography have made it likely that these sources will provide less support than previously toward the budget of the American Office. The actual decrease, if any, will not be clear until the effects of the transition are fully understood in the next year or two.

The other important aspect of the transition has been the change in workflow for the bibliographers at the local offices. Initially, productivity was, as expected, reduced somewhat as people were learning the new system, but now productivity is normal once more. Brepols is experimenting with technological solutions that could one day improve productivity, but these efforts are still embryonic. Brepols also wants to improve the online database by encouraging the bibliographers to enter more keywords for piece.

Meanwhile, the amount of material that would ideally be covered in the database keeps growing year by year. The American Office is responsible for journals and numerous collective volumes originating in English-speaking countries, and some from elsewhere. Some journals and edited volumes already publish abstracts of their articles, and these abstracts are often a great help to the bibliographers, since a good abstract significantly shortens the time a bibliographer needs to devote to the associated article or chapter. The Advisory Board concluded that one way to help the personnel of the American Office meet the challenge of the ever-increasing material is to recommend that the practice of including abstracts (and keywords) be much more widely adopted and that the usefulness of abstracts be promoted by giving guidance about what will smooth the workflow for the bibliographers. The recommendation includes the notion that abstracts ought to be provided with a Creative Commons license, since the point of the abstract is to inform potential readers and attract them to the full article, not to earn revenue through the assertion of copyright restrictions.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.
Pleiades front page.

Pleiades is an online database of spatial information modeled on the long tradition of gazetteers. It is most useful to people interested in Greek and Roman material but also includes a growing amount of information concerning other ancient cultures.

The user interface is simple and intuitive. First, type the name of a place into the search bar. Then, if Pleiades recognizes the name, it provides a selection of peer-reviewed information about that place: for example, alternate names, relevant citations, and chronological periods during which the place was active.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/12/2021 - 10:01am by .

A message from the National Humanities Alliance:

"Advocates from all 50 states and Washington D.C. will be meeting virtually with their Members of Congress and congressional staff to discuss federal funding for the humanities. They will be thanking Members of Congress for the funding in the American Rescue Plan and pushing for increased funding for a wide range of humanities programs in FY 2022!

Help bolster their efforts by writing to your Members of Congress today!

We’ve won incremental increases for the NEH in each of the past 6 years, but given the needs of the humanities community and the crucial role they have to play in the current moment, we are urging a far more robust increase this year. Take action for the NEH!

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Wed, 03/10/2021 - 9:14am by Helen Cullyer.
Logo of the Women's Classical Caucus

In Part 3 of our guest series for the SCS Blog, the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winner of its 2020-21 Public Scholarship Award: Peopling the Past, a grassroots group of Canadian archaeologists and art historians of the ancient Mediterranean who have created resources accessible to audiences of all ages.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 2:08pm by Caroline Cheung.

Gorgias/Gorgias

The Sicilian Orator and the Platonic Dialogue

Exedra Mediterranean Center

Syracuse, Sicily, 23-26 November, 2021

with a pre-conference seminar on selections of his writings in Greek (November 22-23) and an excursion to the archaeological site and museum of Leontini, November 27.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 1:49pm by Erik Shell.

Sex, Rage, & Change:Feminist Adaptation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses

a public conversation with Nina MacLaughlin, Paisley Rekdal, and Stephanie McCarter

4 p.m. CST Thursday, April 8, 2021

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 1:39pm by Erik Shell.

Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions

SPRING LECTURE SERIES 2021

Après le deluge: plagues, propaganda, and the mobility of the divine

Please join SAMR members in a lecture series this Spring devoted to the exploration of ancient ritual responses to questions that have filled our minds, hearts and news feeds over an extraordinary year. Four speakers have will explore contemporary issues, including disease, identity, mobility and disempowered cultural groups through the lenses of ancient ritual practice.  All are welcome -mark your calendars!

All sessions will be held at this Zoom address: https://pugetsound-edu.zoom.us/j/93329292263

March 11, at 12 noon EST

“Osor-Hapi: North African Cult Paradigms during the Hellenistic and Roman Periods.”

Dr. Vivian A. Laughlin

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:49am by Erik Shell.

The second iteration of the conference, Res Difficiles 2.0 Difficult Conversations in Classics (ResDiff2), will be held March 20, 2021; registration is now

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:46am by Erik Shell.

The Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

International Online Conference

14th  May 2021

Organised by  Classical Students Association of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:43am by Erik Shell.
Goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone give grain to Triptolemos and teach him the art of agriculture. Marble Relief from Eleusis. ca. 430 BCE. Roman copy. ca. 27 BCE – 14 CE. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. Most of the projects funded take place in the US and Canada, though the initiative is growing and has funded projects in the UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, and Puerto Rico. This post highlights projects that foster engagement and education for school-aged children and young adults from California to Canada, Chicago to New York.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/26/2021 - 9:15am by .

The Executive Committee of the SCS has issued the following statement:

For several years, serious issues have arisen concerning online communications within the classics community. The SCS reminds its members to respect the dignity of one another in professional and private communications. These communications include, inter alia, social media posts and direct messages, private emails, and messages posted to email listservs. In view of these concerns the SCS Professional Matters Division is preparing guidelines for social media and other online communications.

Approved 2/25/2021

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Thu, 02/25/2021 - 4:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

Pages

Latest Stories

Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
(A message from Dennis Looney, MLA)
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
Wood and Ceramic: Introducing digital methods with Classics Library s

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy