SCS Board Resolution on Abstract Publication

Resolution approved by the Board of Directors of the SCS, Jan. 6, 2019

The SCS Board of Directors approved the following recommendation at its meeting on January 6, 2019. It will be communicated to journal editors and to classics editors at relevant presses, that is, those whose publications fall under the responsibility of the American Office. We will also investigate whether the recommendation can be more widely discussed and adopted.

Board Resolution

In view of the ever-growing number of articles and chapters in collective volumes that the American Office for L’Année philologique is responsible for processing, it is the strong recommendation of the SCS that journal and volume editors regard it as a best practice and a routine adjunct of the publication process that each article or chapter be accompanied by a brief abstract and a list of keywords.

To ensure the utility of abstracts and keywords for the efficient compilation of data for APh, please take note of the following guidelines:

1. The abstract should give a concise but informative summary of the article’s or chapter’s content, indicating important points of argumentation and main conclusions.

2. The abstract should refer to the types of evidence adduced in drawing these conclusions, and give specific information about the most important items.

  • literary: cite the author or genre, and if an author, cite the works discussed and the most significant passages (The recommended abbreviations of Greek works are as in LSJ or DGE [http://www.filol.csic.es/dge/lst/2lst1.htm], and of Latin works as in TLL.)
  • epigraphical:  cite the most significant inscriptions
  • papyrological: cite the papyri (for the standard abbreviations, use the Checklist at http://papyri.info/docs/checklist)
  • artistic: cite the significant pieces, remembering to include museum inventory numbers
  • manuscript evidence: cite the library and shelfmark
  • archaeological: include the name of the sponsoring institution and the nature of the evidence (such as field report)

3. Abstract and keywords should be provided under a Creative Commons license.

Reasoning for this Resolution

Over the past couple of years, the SCS Board of Directors and its Advisory Board on the American Office of L’Année philologique has been following the progress of the transition of the classical bibliographic database to a new publisher and provider of online access, namely Brepols. This change came about because SIBC (Société Internationale de Bibliographie Classique) found it necessary to make new arrangements since the previous platform could no longer be sustained.

This transition has been a source of uncertainty for at least two reasons. First, the different pricing structure used by Brepols has made it unclear for the moment how many old subscribers have maintained their subscriptions or how many new subscribers have been acquired. Second, changes both in the level of projected revenue to be shared among local offices and in the terms governing the royalties to SCS for the data that was originally developed by the Database of Classical Bibliography have made it likely that these sources will provide less support than previously toward the budget of the American Office. The actual decrease, if any, will not be clear until the effects of the transition are fully understood in the next year or two.

The other important aspect of the transition has been the change in workflow for the bibliographers at the local offices. Initially, productivity was, as expected, reduced somewhat as people were learning the new system, but now productivity is normal once more. Brepols is experimenting with technological solutions that could one day improve productivity, but these efforts are still embryonic. Brepols also wants to improve the online database by encouraging the bibliographers to enter more keywords for piece.

Meanwhile, the amount of material that would ideally be covered in the database keeps growing year by year. The American Office is responsible for journals and numerous collective volumes originating in English-speaking countries, and some from elsewhere. Some journals and edited volumes already publish abstracts of their articles, and these abstracts are often a great help to the bibliographers, since a good abstract significantly shortens the time a bibliographer needs to devote to the associated article or chapter. The Advisory Board concluded that one way to help the personnel of the American Office meet the challenge of the ever-increasing material is to recommend that the practice of including abstracts (and keywords) be much more widely adopted and that the usefulness of abstracts be promoted by giving guidance about what will smooth the workflow for the bibliographers. The recommendation includes the notion that abstracts ought to be provided with a Creative Commons license, since the point of the abstract is to inform potential readers and attract them to the full article, not to earn revenue through the assertion of copyright restrictions.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Summer 2021 Election Slate

The 2020-2021 SCS Nominating Committee, co-chaired by Laurel Fulkerson and Celia Schultz, has worked hard through the late Fall 2020 and early 2021. The Committee is pleased to present the following slate of candidates for election in Summer 2021. All candidates listed below have agreed to stand. SCS will publish candidate statements in the late spring or early summer and online voting will begin as usual on or around August 1.

President-Elect (one to be elected)

Lesley Dean-Jones

Matthew Roller 

Financial Trustee (one to be elected)

Daniel Berman

Joseph Farrell

Vice President for Education (one to be elected)

Dani Bostick

Teresa Ramsby

Directors (two to be elected)

(one candidate, Yurie Hong, has withdrawn)

Young Richard Kim

Nandini Pandey

Bronwen Wickkiser

Craig Williams

Nominating Committee (two to be elected)

Ronnie Ancona

Pramit Chaudhuri

Joel Christensen

Akira Yatsuhashi

Program Committee (one to be elected)

Rosa Andújar

Denise Demetriou

Goodwin Committee (two to be elected)

Rhiannon Ash

Constanze Guthenke

Yopie Prins

Phiroze Vasunia 

Committee on Professional Ethics (two to be elected)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 1:45pm by Erik Shell.
Banner of the Women's Classical Caucus, est. 1972

In Part 2 of our guest series for the SCS Blog, the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winner of its 2020–2021 Leadership Award: Suzanne Lye, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The award recognizes Dr. Lye’s extraordinary leadership and initiative in establishing, administering, and fundraising for the SCS-WCC Covid-19 Relief Fund. Since April 2020, this emergency microgrant fund has distributed no-strings-attached awards of up to $500 to North American classicists in need.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 10:27am by Caroline Cheung.
Gaius Gracchus addressing the plebeians. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

If there’s one thing in this divided America that we can all agree on, it’s that former president Donald J. Trump’s impeachment lawyer Bruce Castor was pretty crappy.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 02/18/2021 - 10:35am by Serena S Witzke.

The Classics Department at UNC-Chapel Hill is sad to announce that Philip A. Stadter died last week at the age of 84 in North Carolina. In over forty years of teaching at UNC, and in almost twenty years of a very active retirement, Philip wrote influential books and articles about Plutarch, Arrian, Thucydides and other authors, and his friendships and mentoring and collaborations extended around the world. There is an obituary online, with information about a service Tuesday 2/16 at 2:30 Eastern time that will have an online component, at https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/newsobserver/obituary.aspx?n=philip-stadter&pid=197767979.

A longer statement from the Department about his life and work is forthcoming.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 02/17/2021 - 1:34pm by Erik Shell.
Women's Classical Caucus logo

The Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winners of its 2020–2021 Public Scholarship and Advocacy awards and to learn more about how their work is influencing our field. Over the next month, the SCS Blog will publish a three-part series of in-depth interviews by the WCC with the award winners, who discuss their work in strengthening communities within the field and introducing new audiences to Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 02/10/2021 - 10:11am by .

The Interplay of Spectacle in the Roman Arena

Call for Papers: An Undergraduate Research Conference hosted by the Texas Tech Classics Program

The Conference will be held virtually on April 17th, 2021.

Featuring respondents Dr. David Larmour (Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Classics at TTU) and Ms. Cait Mongrain (Doctoral candidate at Princeton, TTU MA ‘15, BA ‘12)

 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 02/08/2021 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.

The Cathartic History Conference is a digital conference, free and open to the public, that aims to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The conference will take place over two days: Friday, February 26th, and Saturday, February 27th. We also invite everyone to join us on Friday, February 19th at 7:00 pm ET for a public lecture by Dr. John Garner on Aristotle's Poetics.

You can learn more at the conference's website here.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 02/03/2021 - 10:05am by Erik Shell.

New Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives at the Harvard University Department of the Classics

The Department of the Classics at Harvard announces the following opportunities and initiatives designed to advance our community’s goals of diversity and inclusion. Prospective applicants and colleagues with questions about these programs are welcome to contact the Department Administrator Teresa Wu (ttwu@fas.harvard.edu).

1. Summer School Scholarships for Intensive Ancient Greek or Latin at the Harvard Summer School

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 02/01/2021 - 10:35am by Erik Shell.

Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2021
PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity
Szeged, Hungary, September 1–3, 2021

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2021, for PhD Students, Young Scholars, as well as M.A. students aspiring to apply to a PhD program.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 02/01/2021 - 10:28am by Erik Shell.
"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Plautus in the late 19th c Heartland: a Symposium and Performance

In May 1884, nine female students at Washington University in St. Louis staged a performance of Plautus’ Rudens (“The Rope”) in Latin, also publishing their own English translation to coincide with the event. The Washington University Ladies’ Literary Society was one of the first groups in America to perform an ancient comedy in Latin, and their work made a splash at the university and in St. Louis.

What were the aims of the Ladies’ Literary Society in putting on the Rudens, how did the show look and sound, and in what social and academic context did these young women train for and execute their ambitious plan? At a virtual symposium hosted by the Washington University Classics and Performing Arts departments, and open to the public, four scholars will explore this historic event in lectures situating it in literary, academic, cultural, and St. Louis history. Following the lectures and discussion, a group of St. Louis classicists will give a virtual performance of the Rudens using the Society’s translation.

The February 6th symposium will begin at 9:00am Central Time with four lectures by Timothy Moore of Washington University in St. Louis, Julia Beine of Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Judith Hallett of the University of Maryland, and Amanda Clark of the Missouri History Museum. The performance, directed by PhD student Henry Schott, will begin at 2:00pm Central Time.

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Mon, 02/01/2021 - 10:26am by Erik Shell.

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