From the SCS President and Executive Director

We are writing for two reasons. First, we reiterate the statement of 1/6/19, authored and approved by the Board of Directors in San Diego. There is no place for racism in our field and we feel that is important to reissue that statement, given the increasing toxicity of online debate and the intensification of online harassment over the last few days:

“The Board of Directors of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) condemns the racist acts and speech that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting. The Society’s policy on harassment addresses, among other things, hostility and abuse based on race and ethnicity. There is no place for racism on the part of members, attendees, vendors, and contractors at the meeting.  In addition, the Board reaffirms its statement of November 2016 in which the directors condemned ‘the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.’” 

Second, we would like to make a clarification regarding Professor Sarah Bond. After the Future of Classics panel, a number of complaints were brought to the Society’s Committee on Professional Ethics. A member of the SCS filed a formal complaint against Professor Bond. The Committee dismissed this complaint, determining in accordance with our procedures that the complaint was not credible and did not rise to the level of requiring formal investigation. The Committee did not approve or recommend to the Board any formal censure of her. However, the Committee did advise that someone communicate to her informally, on behalf of the Committee, some concerns regarding her behavior at the panel. The subsequent communication with Professor Bond resulted in misunderstandings of the content and intent of the Ethics Committee's concerns, particularly because it was not explicitly stated to Professor Bond that she was not being formally censured as a result of a complaint. We apologize for the great hurt and damage that this has caused to Professor Sarah Bond, our Communications Committee chair and blog editor, who does so much good for the Society.  The President and Executive Director bear the ultimate responsibility for the miscommunication and mishandling of the situation, and the subsequent damage, including the ambiguity of whether she was censured. Together with the Board, we are reviewing our procedures to ensure that what Professor Bond experienced does not happen again.

Mary T. Boatwright, SCS President 2019 

Helen Cullyer, Executive Director 


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(Cross-posted from @libertinopatren)

Are you a classicist at any stage of your career? (From high school to tenured professor)

Do you self-identify as part of a group that's faced structural barriers to educational success? (e.g. BIPOC, disabled, LGBTQ+, working class, student parent...)

This is a conference BY us and FOR us, to showcase our excellence!

The conference will be online: Saturday, June 22nd.

Students will have their papers read/developed with UC Berkeely Ph.D. students. Professors: Show the next generation the brilliance of classicists like us!

To Submit: Paper presentations (OR creative performances like poetry/art), 15-20 minutes in length, on any classical topic.

Send submissions and questions to libertinopatrenatus@gmail.com.

Conference will be hosted by The Sportula (twitter.com/libertinopatreon)

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/10/2019 - 9:19am by Erik Shell.

As some of you witnessed personally and all can now read (see, e.g., The Chronicle), the 150th Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies last weekend in San Diego was disgraced by two shocking incidents. One occurred when an independent scholar attending a panel told Princeton Assistant Professor Dan-el Padilla Peralta that he got his job because he is black. The SCS, after consulting internally and in accordance with our annual meeting harassment policy, notified the scholar that she should no longer attend SCS sessions and events in San Diego. In the other incident, the founders of the Sportula, two students of color, were questioned by a hotel staff member about their presence at the conference. We are in contact with the Marriott. We have reached out to the students to express our support. We also understand that the Marriott has contacted them to better understand their experience and apologize.

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Wed, 01/09/2019 - 9:17pm by Helen Cullyer.

The Board of Directors of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) condemns the racist acts and speech that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting. The Society’s policy on harassment addresses, among other things, hostility and abuse based on race and ethnicity. There is no place for racism on the part of members, attendees, vendors, and contractors at the meeting.  In addition, the Board reaffirms its statement of November 2016 in which the directors condemned “the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.” 

January 6, 2019

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Sun, 01/06/2019 - 7:36pm by Helen Cullyer.

Perhaps paradoxically, Classicists spend a lot of time thinking about the future of our field. Although we spend the majority of our working days researching ancient material, teaching such material to students, and thinking about the particulars of a Latin text, North African relief, Hellenistic religious rite, or exceptionally obscure Greek gnome (e.g. “Water is best”), we often wonder (with various levels of anxiety) how such work will be done in the future, or if there will even be Classics in the future.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 01/04/2019 - 6:18am by Christopher Trinacty.
San Diego Reflecting Pond

Mary Beard

What is Classics?

Saturday, January 5, 6:15-7:30pm

San Diego Marriott Marquis at the Marina

Marriott Grand Ballroom 9

This lecture is free and open to the public.

What do we mean by Classics now? Why should we study the ancient Greeks and Romans (and other ancient cultures)? How do we think through its apparently reactionary heritage?

This lecture goes back through the 150 year history of the SCS in an attempt to give an optimistic view of the future of the past.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/02/2019 - 9:38am by Helen Cullyer.
150th Logo

Registered meeting attendees are invited to the SCS Plenary Session and Presidential Reception on Saturday January 5 at the AIA-SCS Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Plenary Session
5:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M.
Marriott Grand Ballroom 11
The plenary session will feature the presentation of the SCS awards, and Joe Farrell will deliver his Presidential Address entitled “Ancient and Modern: A Critical Reflection.” Copies of the Goodwin Award books will be awarded as door prizes.
 
SCS Presidential Reception
7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Marriott Grand Ballroom 8
 
The Board of Directors cordially invites all SCS members attending the 150th Annual Meeting to a reception honoring President Joe Farrell on Saturday, January 5. The Board encourages all members to attend the reception and meet those colleagues they may not have seen earlier in the meeting. This event is sponsored by the American Classical League in recognition of the centennial of the ACL and the sesquicentennial of the SCS.
 
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/01/2019 - 11:46am by Helen Cullyer.
San Diego Reflecting Pond

Luis Alfaro

From the Ancient to the Streets of L.A.: Imagining the Greek Classics for Communities Today

Thursday, January 3, 8:15-9:30PM

San Diego Marriott Marquis at the Marina

Marriott Grand Ballroom 9

Hosted by the SCS and co-organized by Classics and Social Justice and the Onassis Foundation USA


In his lecture, playwright Luis Alfaro, author of Mojada and Oedipus El Rey, guides us on a journey from Athens to East L.A. as we connect the ancient myths and bring them alive for contemporary audiences today. Socrates reminds us that storytelling changes and grows, but do stories ever lose their meaning and power? Come discover the journey that makes these classics still essential today.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/01/2019 - 11:38am by Helen Cullyer.

Last week the SCS blog reflected on what really does seem to be a golden age of Classics podcasting, where audio content that you can listen to on a portable device whenever convenient has made it easier than ever to teach people about ancient history, to help teachers develop the active use of ancient languages, and to share cutting edge research and scholarly perspectives on the material we study.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/31/2018 - 6:07am by Curtis Dozier.

By Erin Averett, Sarah E. Bond, Derek Counts, and Bethany Wasik
 

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 12/28/2018 - 6:26am by Erin Averett.

By Curtis Dozier and Christopher B. Polt

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3–6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. This week we are focusing on the Podcasting the Classics panel (8:00am–10:30am on Saturday, Jan. 5) by pointing to some resources for those who want to explore the medium more fully.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 12/27/2018 - 5:48am by Curtis Dozier.

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