From the SCS President and Executive Director

We are writing for two reasons. First, we reiterate the statement of 1/6/19, authored and approved by the Board of Directors in San Diego. There is no place for racism in our field and we feel that is important to reissue that statement, given the increasing toxicity of online debate and the intensification of online harassment over the last few days:

“The Board of Directors of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) condemns the racist acts and speech that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting. The Society’s policy on harassment addresses, among other things, hostility and abuse based on race and ethnicity. There is no place for racism on the part of members, attendees, vendors, and contractors at the meeting.  In addition, the Board reaffirms its statement of November 2016 in which the directors condemned ‘the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.’” 

Second, we would like to make a clarification regarding Professor Sarah Bond. After the Future of Classics panel, a number of complaints were brought to the Society’s Committee on Professional Ethics. A member of the SCS filed a formal complaint against Professor Bond. The Committee dismissed this complaint, determining in accordance with our procedures that the complaint was not credible and did not rise to the level of requiring formal investigation. The Committee did not approve or recommend to the Board any formal censure of her. However, the Committee did advise that someone communicate to her informally, on behalf of the Committee, some concerns regarding her behavior at the panel. The subsequent communication with Professor Bond resulted in misunderstandings of the content and intent of the Ethics Committee's concerns, particularly because it was not explicitly stated to Professor Bond that she was not being formally censured as a result of a complaint. We apologize for the great hurt and damage that this has caused to Professor Sarah Bond, our Communications Committee chair and blog editor, who does so much good for the Society.  The President and Executive Director bear the ultimate responsibility for the miscommunication and mishandling of the situation, and the subsequent damage, including the ambiguity of whether she was censured. Together with the Board, we are reviewing our procedures to ensure that what Professor Bond experienced does not happen again.

Mary T. Boatwright, SCS President 2019 

Helen Cullyer, Executive Director 


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POWER AND KNOWLEDGE
in Plato and the Platonic Tradition
22-24 May, Uppsala (Sweden)

Registration is now open for the international symposium ‘Power & Knowledge in Plato and the Platonic Tradition', which will take place at the department of philosophy at Uppsala University on the 22nd-24th of May 2019. The program is included below. For more information about the symposium and what we hope to achieve, see: http://rationalselfgovernment.se/power-and-knowledge/.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 12:10pm by Erik Shell.

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2019

Invention has fascinated audiences at least since the god Hephaestus created self-locomoting robot-women as workshop assistants—and Prometheus’ theft of fire allowed humans to develop their own technology. From Méliès’ re-creation of Lucian’s trip to the moon, to myriad takes on Pygmalion fabricating the “perfect woman,” to Hypatia’s fatal scientific inquiry in Amenábar’s Agora, on-screen depictions of invention and technology in the ancient Mediterranean world and the classical tradition have dramatized their potential to delight, empower, and enlighten—as well as the ethical and moral concerns they stimulate.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.

Those who will submit Individual Abstracts for the 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. should sign up for their SCS memberships by this Friday, April 11th, as memberships take a couple days to process and all submissions must come from SCS Members.

You can renew or sign up for SCS membership here: https://scs.press.jhu.edu/membership/join

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 10:28am by Erik Shell.

We would like to remind SCS members who are considering submitting for the 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., that the Lightning Talk format - launched this year at our Sesquicentennial - is returning for 2020 as well.

Members who have a topic about which they are passionate and can speak succinctly are encouraged to apply.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 04/10/2019 - 2:41pm by Erik Shell.

Please note these important upcoming deadlines:

1. The deadline for submission of the following is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 8:

  • Panel, seminar, workshop, and roundtable proposals for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Affiliated group and organizer-refereed panel reports for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Applications for renewed or new charters for affiliated groups
  • Applications for organizer-refereed panels for the 2021 Annual Meeting

2. The deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/08/2019 - 8:26am by Erik Shell.
Teaching Rome at Home:  The Classics in America
A conference at the University of Maryland, College Park
May 2-4, 2019

Thursday, May 2

3:30 PM  Keynote lecture:  “The Lion in the Path:  Classics Meets Modernity”
Hunter R. Rawlings III, Professor and University President Emeritus, Cornell University

5:00 PM  Reception

Friday, May 3

1:00 – 1:50  “The ‘Gender Turn’ in Classics,” Eva Stehle, University of Maryland, Emerita

1:50 – 2:00  Break

2:00 – 3:30  Paper session

2:00  “The Value of Latin in the Liberal Arts Curriculum,” Norman Austin, University of Arizona, Emeritus

2:30  “Vergil’s Aeneid and Twenty-first Century Immigration,” Christopher Nappa, University of Minnesota

3:00  “A Latin Curriculum Set in Africa Proconsularis,” Holly Sypniewski, Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi; Kenneth Morrell, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee; and Lindsay Samson, Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia

3:30 – 4:00  Break

4:00 – 5:00  Workshop:  “Confronting Sexual Violence in the Secondary Latin Classroom,” Danielle Bostick, John Handley High School, Winchester, Virginia

5:00  Reception

Saturday, May 4

10:00 - 12:00  Paper session

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 04/05/2019 - 9:15am by Erik Shell.

A Day in the Life of A Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog, celebrating the working lives of classicists. This month, we look at the life of Classics graduate student Jordan Johansen.  

I typically wake up early, around 5:30 am. I never considered myself a morning person until I got to graduate school, but I got in the habit from taking Greek & Latin survey classes. I found that I couldn’t read Greek and Latin as clearly, efficiently, or quickly late at night, so I started working in the morning. Now that I’m done with surveys, I’ve kept up with the habit. I like that I can get a lot done before I start my day on campus. There are also usually not very many emails coming in that early, so it’s easier to keep from being distracted.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 04/04/2019 - 5:04pm by Jordan Johansen.
NEH Logo

April, 2019

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Brenda Longfellow (University of Iowa) - "Women in Public in Ancient Pompeii"
  • Mont Allen (Southern Illinois University) - "Ancient Practices: An Interdisciplinary Minor"
  • Peter Meineck (Aquila Theatre Company Inc.) - "The Warrior Chorus: American Odyssey"
  • Alex Gottesman (Temple University) - "Freedom of Speech in Ancient Athens"
  • Danielle St. Hilaire (Duquesne University) - "The Art of Compassion: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Pity in Early Modern English Literature"
  • Michelle McMahon (American Research Center in Egypt) - "Sharing 7,000 Years of Egyptian Culture with the American Research Center in Egypt's Open Access Conservation Archive"
  • Laura McClure (University of Wisconsin, Madison) - "Reimagining the Chorus: Modern American Poety Hilda Doolittle (known as H.D.) and Greek Tragedy"

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 04/04/2019 - 10:52am by Erik Shell.

CFP: 2019 SAGP Annual Meeting

November 16-17, 2019
Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA
 
Panel Proposal Deadline: May 1
Paper Abstract Deadline: June 1
Submit abstracts and proposals to apreus@binghamton.edu.

All participants must be members of the SAGP. To become a member, fill out the form linked to here and mail it to A. Preus, SAGP Philosophy, Binghamton University, 13902-6000. 

Paper Abstracts

We invite people to submit abstracts on any topic in ancient Greek philosophy, broadly construed. For example:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 04/02/2019 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.

On March 15, the Aquila Theatre, in collaboration with SCS and the Onassis Foundation USA, produced a staged reading at BAM of Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey. You can read more about the staged reading here.

Congratulations to Aquila on its recently announced NEH grant of $250,000 for The Warrior Chorus: An American Odyssey.  This program will train veterans and scholars in three regional centers across the US to lead audience forums, workshops, and reading groups connected with a staging of Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey.

Photo Credit: Odysseus (James Edward Becton) and Penelope (Karen Alvarado), photo by Dan Gorman, 2019, copyright Frago Media LLC

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Tue, 04/02/2019 - 11:20am by Helen Cullyer.

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