From the SCS President and Executive Director

We are writing for two reasons. First, we reiterate the statement of 1/6/19, authored and approved by the Board of Directors in San Diego. There is no place for racism in our field and we feel that is important to reissue that statement, given the increasing toxicity of online debate and the intensification of online harassment over the last few days:

“The Board of Directors of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) condemns the racist acts and speech that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting. The Society’s policy on harassment addresses, among other things, hostility and abuse based on race and ethnicity. There is no place for racism on the part of members, attendees, vendors, and contractors at the meeting.  In addition, the Board reaffirms its statement of November 2016 in which the directors condemned ‘the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.’” 

Second, we would like to make a clarification regarding Professor Sarah Bond. After the Future of Classics panel, a number of complaints were brought to the Society’s Committee on Professional Ethics. A member of the SCS filed a formal complaint against Professor Bond. The Committee dismissed this complaint, determining in accordance with our procedures that the complaint was not credible and did not rise to the level of requiring formal investigation. The Committee did not approve or recommend to the Board any formal censure of her. However, the Committee did advise that someone communicate to her informally, on behalf of the Committee, some concerns regarding her behavior at the panel. The subsequent communication with Professor Bond resulted in misunderstandings of the content and intent of the Ethics Committee's concerns, particularly because it was not explicitly stated to Professor Bond that she was not being formally censured as a result of a complaint. We apologize for the great hurt and damage that this has caused to Professor Sarah Bond, our Communications Committee chair and blog editor, who does so much good for the Society.  The President and Executive Director bear the ultimate responsibility for the miscommunication and mishandling of the situation, and the subsequent damage, including the ambiguity of whether she was censured. Together with the Board, we are reviewing our procedures to ensure that what Professor Bond experienced does not happen again.

Mary T. Boatwright, SCS President 2019 

Helen Cullyer, Executive Director 


Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Food and Drink in the Ancient World

Rutgers University, May 31 - June 1, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Kristina Killgrove, UNC Chapel Hill

Human activity is regulated by the constant need to acquire and consume food. Assuredly, food and drink played a significant role in antiquity just as now, and, since we all must eat and drink, we naturally become curious about what and how our distant ancestors ate and drank (Alcock 2006). The study of food and drink in the ancient world expanded tremendously in the 1990s and has continued to do so in the decades following (e.g. Davison 1997, Garnsey 1999, Wilkins and Hill 2006). This resultant trend is partly owed to a focus in research less preoccupied with the great deeds of great men, but one open to seeing antiquity as a period that offers a wealth of information on the varied life of the everyday world (Donahue 2015).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 01/11/2019 - 10:36am by Erik Shell.

The 49th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest (CAPN) at Gonzaga University in Spokane, WA, has been rescheduled for April 5-6, 2019. As such we are renewing the Call for Papers. Please see below for the timeline for the submission process.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Donna Zuckerberg, editor of Eidolon and author of Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age. This lecture will be open to the general public as well.

Keynote Title and Abstract: Who's Revitalizing Homer?: The Relevance and Risks of Classical Reception Today
Recently, a surprising group has taken up the mantle of explaining why the study of the ancient Greeks and Romans remains vitally important: the alt-right. Alt-right thinkers present themselves as protectors of the Classics who are saving the cultural heritage of the West from social-justice-warrior professors who secretly want to destroy it. In this lecture, Donna Zuckerberg explores what antiquity means to far-right online communities and what progressive classicists can do to respond.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 01/11/2019 - 10:16am by Erik Shell.
Header Image: Athena looks on as Oedipus slays the Sphinx (Attic red-figured lekythos, 420-400 BCE now at the British Museum).

On Thursday evening at the annual meeting of the SCS, together with about 150 others, I witnessed, experienced, and participated in something beautiful. With the enthusiastic support of the SCS, Classics and Social Justice, and the organization I work for, the Onassis Foundation USA, playwright and activist Luis Alfaro shared with a captivated audience his heart, his brilliance, and his creativity, a shining example of the good that can be done with and to Classics, and the reach our discipline can have to new, perhaps unexpected audiences. I resist here the urge to discuss some of the painful ugliness we saw at our meeting, leaving only a hint of it in the title I originally thought of for this piece, because I do not want to take away from the light Luis brought to us.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/10/2019 - 8:59pm by Young Richard Kim.

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States is seeking applications for the position of Webmaster. The Webmaster will serve a three-year term, with the first term beginning immediately after the 2019 CAAS Board Meeting on Saturday, April 13 and running through the end of the Fall 2021 Annual Meeting. The position carries a stipend of $3,000 per annum, and may be renewed for more than one term.  Time commitment will vary during the year but may be up to 7.5 hours per week during peak times.

The general responsibilities of the Webmaster according to the CAAS Bylaws:

The Webmaster shall maintain and update the Corporation’s website and manage all on-line functions associated with the website.

A more detailed description of the responsibilities are listed in the CAAS Regulations and Operating procedures. The applicable functions are:

The Webmaster, a Board-appointed officer serving a three-year renewable term, shall:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/10/2019 - 11:04am by Erik Shell.

(Cross-posted from @libertinopatren)

Are you a classicist at any stage of your career? (From high school to tenured professor)

Do you self-identify as part of a group that's faced structural barriers to educational success? (e.g. BIPOC, disabled, LGBTQ+, working class, student parent...)

This is a conference BY us and FOR us, to showcase our excellence!

The conference will be online: Saturday, June 22nd.

Students will have their papers read/developed with UC Berkeely Ph.D. students. Professors: Show the next generation the brilliance of classicists like us!

To Submit: Paper presentations (OR creative performances like poetry/art), 15-20 minutes in length, on any classical topic.

Send submissions and questions to libertinopatrenatus@gmail.com.

Conference will be hosted by The Sportula (twitter.com/libertinopatreon)

---

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/10/2019 - 9:19am by Erik Shell.

As some of you witnessed personally and all can now read (see, e.g., The Chronicle), the 150th Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies last weekend in San Diego was disgraced by two shocking incidents. One occurred when an independent scholar attending a panel told Princeton Assistant Professor Dan-el Padilla Peralta that he got his job because he is black. The SCS, after consulting internally and in accordance with our annual meeting harassment policy, notified the scholar that she should no longer attend SCS sessions and events in San Diego. In the other incident, the founders of the Sportula, two students of color, were questioned by a hotel staff member about their presence at the conference. We are in contact with the Marriott. We have reached out to the students to express our support. We also understand that the Marriott has contacted them to better understand their experience and apologize.

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Wed, 01/09/2019 - 9:17pm by Helen Cullyer.

The Board of Directors of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) condemns the racist acts and speech that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting. The Society’s policy on harassment addresses, among other things, hostility and abuse based on race and ethnicity. There is no place for racism on the part of members, attendees, vendors, and contractors at the meeting.  In addition, the Board reaffirms its statement of November 2016 in which the directors condemned “the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.” 

January 6, 2019

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Sun, 01/06/2019 - 7:36pm by Helen Cullyer.

Perhaps paradoxically, Classicists spend a lot of time thinking about the future of our field. Although we spend the majority of our working days researching ancient material, teaching such material to students, and thinking about the particulars of a Latin text, North African relief, Hellenistic religious rite, or exceptionally obscure Greek gnome (e.g. “Water is best”), we often wonder (with various levels of anxiety) how such work will be done in the future, or if there will even be Classics in the future.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 01/04/2019 - 6:18am by Christopher Trinacty.
San Diego Reflecting Pond

Mary Beard

What is Classics?

Saturday, January 5, 6:15-7:30pm

San Diego Marriott Marquis at the Marina

Marriott Grand Ballroom 9

This lecture is free and open to the public.

What do we mean by Classics now? Why should we study the ancient Greeks and Romans (and other ancient cultures)? How do we think through its apparently reactionary heritage?

This lecture goes back through the 150 year history of the SCS in an attempt to give an optimistic view of the future of the past.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/02/2019 - 9:38am by Helen Cullyer.
150th Logo

Registered meeting attendees are invited to the SCS Plenary Session and Presidential Reception on Saturday January 5 at the AIA-SCS Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Plenary Session
5:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M.
Marriott Grand Ballroom 11
The plenary session will feature the presentation of the SCS awards, and Joe Farrell will deliver his Presidential Address entitled “Ancient and Modern: A Critical Reflection.” Copies of the Goodwin Award books will be awarded as door prizes.
 
SCS Presidential Reception
7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Marriott Grand Ballroom 8
 
The Board of Directors cordially invites all SCS members attending the 150th Annual Meeting to a reception honoring President Joe Farrell on Saturday, January 5. The Board encourages all members to attend the reception and meet those colleagues they may not have seen earlier in the meeting. This event is sponsored by the American Classical League in recognition of the centennial of the ACL and the sesquicentennial of the SCS.
 
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/01/2019 - 11:46am by Helen Cullyer.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Call for Papers October, 26th 2019.
Performances
The Department of Classics and the Ancient Theater Performance Group of Corne
Calls for Papers
The Many Faces of War V: An annual interdisciplinary symposium on the
SCS Announcements
SCS is pleased to announce the addition of a candidate to the 2019 election s

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy