SCS Statement on Harassment at the Annual Meeting

The Women's Classical Caucus (WCC) is undertaking a major initiative to address all forms of harassment in the field of Classics.  As part of this initiative, the WCC leadership has begun to collaborate with the SCS Committee on Gender and Sexuality in the Profession, and Vice President for Professional Matters, Barbara Gold.  The first result of this collaboration is the following statement addressing harassment, bullying, and intimidation at the Annual Meeting. This statement has been approved by the SCS Board of Directors. 

Statement on Harassment

The SCS and its members seek to create an atmosphere at their annual conference in which participants may learn, network, and converse with colleagues in an environment of mutual respect.  Everyone who attends the annual meeting is entitled to an experience that is free from harassment, bullying, and intimidation directed towards any attendee.  Harassment includes, but is not limited to, sexual harassment, such as unwelcome sexual advances, or other verbal or physical contact of a sexual nature.  Harassment also pertains to activities/behaviors such as stalking, queer/trans bullying, or hostility or abuse based on age, disability, religion, race or ethnicity.  Such conduct is harmful, disrespectful and unprofessional.  No attendee should under any circumstance engage in harassment, bullying, or intimidation of other attendees either in person or online.  By attending the meeting, all participants accept the obligation to uphold the rights of attendees and treat everyone with respect. The SCS does not seek to limit the areas of inquiry of its members or to curtail robust scholarly debate. Its aim is to promote critical and open inquiry that is free of personal harassment, prejudice and aggression. 

Members should be aware that they are bound by the codes of conduct at their home institutions. The SCS code does not supersede these workplace codes but is intended to reinforce their message.

In the event that a SCS attendee experiences harassment, bullying, or intimidation at the meeting that is inconsistent with the values articulated in the Society’s professional ethics statement, the attendee is encouraged to make a report in writing to the Vice President for Professional Matters.  This report will remain confidential and will be shared only with the Professional Ethics Committee.  The Vice President and the committee will work together to look into the reported behavior, to contact the person who has reported the behavior, and, if warranted, to contact the person about whom the complaint has been made.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Call for Abstracts
Conference Theme: The Classic in the Modern
Classical Reception
 
Saturday February 23rd 2019
8:30 – ~5:00
St. Paul’s building

Saturday March 2nd 2019 (snow date)

Purpose: Northeast Catholic College is pleased to announce its Spring Conference with a theme of Classical Reception. This conference hopes to further the discussion of how Classical literature and civilization is received by later cultures.

Scope: This conference proposes to discuss the reception of Classical literature and civilization across disciplines. While the conference theme focuses on the reception of Classics today, any paper with the topic of Classical reception will be considered. Presenters should plan for fifteen-twenty minute papers, with a few questions to follow.

This conference is meant especially for Graduate students, but faculty and independent researchers are welcome. Undergraduate students and Highs School students are welcome to submit papers for a “future classicists” panel, papers submitted will require faculty sponsorship.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/24/2018 - 9:54am by Erik Shell.
Pennsylvania Circle of Ancient Philosophy
Annual Conference
 
Villanova University
Friday March 22 – Sunday March 24, 2019
Call for Papers: Due Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Keynote Speakers: Dr. Aryeh Kosman, Haverford College

Dr. Grace Ledbetter, Swarthmore College  

Scholars, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates are encouraged to submit their work in any area of Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and cognate fields (e.g., rhetoric, political theory, medicine, history). Special consideration will be given to authors working or living in Pennsylvania. We especially welcome submissions from members of underrepresented populations within philosophy.This year the conference will be hosted at Villanova University.

About PCAP:

The Pennsylvania Circle of Ancient Philosophy (PCAP) aims to foster a community of scholars committed to the study of ancient philosophy. To this end, PCAP provides the opportunity for Pennsylvania graduate students and faculty to meet and present papers at its annual conference. Additionally, PCAP organizes other events throughout the year, including workshops, intensive seminars, and group translation projects.

Guide for the submission abstracts:

There are four types of submissions accepted for this conference: 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/23/2018 - 10:47am by Erik Shell.

2019 Ohio State Classics Graduate Colloquium

A Crucible of Cultures: Cultural Exchange in the Ancient Mediterranean

In the wake of Hordern and Purcell’s The Corrupting Sea, there has been a renewed interest in studying the cultures of the Mediterranean as part of an integrated whole rather than in isolation. The annual OSU Classics Graduate Colloquium invites papers on a range of topics that explore the interconnections between peoples in and around the Mediterranean in the ancient world broadly conceived (Bronze Age to Byzantium/Carolingian Renaissance). Since most research has focused on relatively narrow archaeological concerns, we encourage papers that attempt to tackle big picture questions. Broad categories might include:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/23/2018 - 9:04am by Erik Shell.

This is a final reminder to check the preliminary program for our upcoming Annual meeting.

If you are presenting at the meeting please check to see if your institutional affiliation, name, and paper title are all properly represented.

Please email any corrections to info@classicalstudies.org by end-of-day, October 26th.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 10/23/2018 - 8:16am by Erik Shell.

Classics in the Anthropocene 

University of Toronto, Department of Classics, Graduate Conference 
April 19-20, 2019 

Keynote Speakers: Brooke Holmes (Princeton), Katherine Blouin (Toronto) 

The recent popularity of the notion of “the Anthropocene” reflects a growing recognition that human societies and their natural environments radically and reciprocally shape and influence one another. Additionally, there is a looming sense that the ecological conditions under which humankind has thrived for millennia are about to undergo a set of epochal transformations. Speculations about the near-future range from optimistic to pessimistic extremes. Will there be a collective and self-conscious effort to re-shape civilization as we have known it, or a total extinction of life on earth? In either case, humanity faces an unprecedented crisis. 

This crisis provides a novel horizon of meaning for the interpretation of human society and culture, past as well as present. The task of rethinking traditional categories such as history, culture, individuality, and nature, has become both possible and necessary. In many disciplines this work is already underway. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/18/2018 - 10:16am by Erik Shell.
The Popular in Classical Antiquity
 
Graduate Student Conference, University of Pennsylvania, April 26, 2019
Keynote speaker: Jeremy Lefkowitz, Swarthmore College

What is popular culture in the ancient world? How can we study it? Why should we study it? In recent years the discipline of Classical Studies has sought to move away from its traditionally elite bias and broaden investigation of the ancient world to include popular culture. From Johann Gottfried Herder’s work on folk songs in the 18th century to Lucy’s Grig’s recent edited volume, the “popular” has been variously defined: as folk culture located in the rural tradition; as mass culture in urbanized centers; as the opposite of “high” or “literate” culture; and as unauthorized culture expressed as resistance. One of the aims of this conference is to discuss the validity of such definitions for the Classical world.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/18/2018 - 9:32am by Erik Shell.
Lapis SatricanusIscrizione latina arcaica, VI secolo a.C. EDR 078476. Photo by Giulia Sarullo - Own work, via Wikimedia CC BY-SA 4.0.

EAGLE, the Electronic Archive of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, was conceived in 1997 by the Italian Epigrapher Silvio Panciera (1933–2016). Based at Sapienza — Università di Roma, it appeared under the aegis of the Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine (AIEGL) and an international steering committee. The site launched in 2003, with the goal of providing a gateway for the search of all Greek and Latin inscriptions.

It began with a collaboration of four major databases of Roman inscriptions. Briefly:

View full article. | Posted in on Sun, 10/14/2018 - 11:28am by Charles Hedrick.

Mediterranean Connections – How the Sea Links People and Transforms Identities

Session 7 of the International Open Workshop: Socio-Environmental Dynamics VI (organized by the  Graduate School “Human Development in Landscapes” and the Collaborative Research Centre 1266 “Scales of Transformation”)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/12/2018 - 2:45pm by Erik Shell.
“Ways of Seeing, Ways of Reading, 2”
The Aesthetics and Anthropology of Arms and Armor
 
Columbia University, Schermerhorn Hall 612
1180 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10027
 
 
- PROGRAM -

Friday, October 19: morning (Columbia University, Schermerhorn Hall 612)

1. Weapons, Good to Think With (9:30-11 am)

- Christine Mauduit (ENS), “Around the Sword: Some Thoughts about Ajax’s Suicide”

- Deborah Steiner (Columbia), "Arms and the Symposion”

- Camille Rambourg (ENS), "Exploring the Question of Responsibility: The Javelin of Antiphon's Second Tetralogy"

- Peter van Alfen (ANS), "Arms and Armor in archaic coins" 

Coffee Break (11-11:30 am)

2. Arms, Culture, Religion (11.30 am-1 pm)

- Ellen Morris (Barnard), "Daggers, Militarism, and the Evolving Culture of Death on the Nile in the Second Millennium BCE"

- Cléo Carastro (EHESS), "Greek Trophies: War and its Dead"

- Christophe Goddard (CNRS), "Arms in Religion, Religions in Arms in Late Antiquity"

- Pierre Terjanian (MMA), "Armor as Votive Gift: Devotion and Self-Representation in Late Medieval and Renaissance Europe”

Lunch Break (1-2:30 pm)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 10/12/2018 - 11:01am by Erik Shell.
Infant Hercules Strangling Two Serpents, late 15th–early 16th century. Bronze. Metropolitan Museum of Art. CC0 1.0.

What is the role of graphic novels in teaching the ancient world to students? Prof. Chris Trinacty addresses this question and reviews two recent additions to the genre: Rome West and The Hero (Book Two). 

Two recent graphic novels touch upon the ancient world in fascinating ways. The first, Rome West, by Justin Giampaoli, Brian Wood, and Andrea Mutti provides an alternative history of the world predicated on the idea that a lost legion of Roman soldiers make landfall in North America in the year 323 CE. The second, The Hero, published by Dark Horse Comics in two volumes is a creative take on Heracles’ Twelve Labors that offers a mash-up of modern celebrity culture, science fiction tropes, ancient archetypes of heroism, and the visual iconography of Heracles especially from Greece vase painting.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 10/11/2018 - 8:43pm by Christopher Trinacty.

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