September 2013 President's Letter: Moving towards the Association’s New Name

In the recent election, the members voted to accept the recommendation of the Board of Directors that we should change the name of our organization to “Society for Classical Studies”, with “Founded in 1869 as the American Philological Association” as a permanent subtitle.  In keeping with the truly remarkable dedication and commitment of our membership, 43% of our members voted in this election, at a time when other learned societies report that only 10-15% of their members typically vote in online elections and ballots.  This is the highest participation rate that our Executive Director, Adam Blistein, has seen in the fourteen years of his tenure, and it is probably the highest ever.

Jeffrey Henderson and I have both written to the membership on a number of occasions about this change, which we and the Board regard as an important part of our organization’s overall response to the changing environment we face as Classicists.  To non-specialists, Classical Studies is a more transparent and comprehensible description of what we do, and so is more accessible to the interested outsiders whom we aim to attract with the new website; Classical Studies is also a more all-embracing term for the range of skills and disciplines within our professional domain.  Our organization has successfully become an effective professional organization as well as a learned society, and now we must also become more inclusive and dynamic in our role as a service organization for all those with an interest in Classics.

It is crucial to recognize that the core of our mission remains research and teaching on the ancient world, and the discipline of philology is a central part of that focus.  We are all committed to that core mission, even as we adapt to the more public role that we have taken on in our transition from Gatekeeper to Gateway.  As part of that commitment, our professional journal will have the name of TAPA, as an acronym that honors the traditions and history of our organization.

The Board is now taking steps to implement the change of name to Society for Classical Studies, which will come into effect in the new year.  We will keep you closely informed on the stages of this implementation, and we will welcome feedback as part of this process.  We know that this is a very big change in the history of our group, and all the members of the Board recognize what a wrench it is to let go of the title that we have proudly sailed under since 1869.  We thank the membership for their engaged response since this debate began, and we look forward to seeing our organization move ahead towards its new commitments and responsibilities.

Denis Feeney
President

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The Boston Globe published a nice remembrance of Ernst Badian today. Read it online here …

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 05/23/2011 - 11:38am by .

"In the Bulgarian seaside resort town of Sozopol, archaeologists have unearthed an ancient temple of the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, the private television channel bTV Reported on May 18 2011. The finds were made at Cape Skamnii in the ancient town of Sozopol. Numerous statues and other artifacts have been found, indicating that the site was, indeed, a temple dedicated to Demeter and Persephone." Read more in The Sofia Echo

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:09pm by Information Architect.

"Strolling through outer peristyle of the Getty Villa in Malibu, Calif., is about as close as you can get to time travelling. It’s easy to feel just like a Roman citizen discussing the affairs of the day while meandering through the gardens dotted with bronze statues or sitting at the edge of the 67-metre-long reflecting pool beneath a low-hanging sun. The only thing missing is the toga. While the ancient ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum in southern Italy leave visitors to piece together in their own minds what the daily lives of Romans must have been like, the Getty Villa leaves very little to the imagination." Read more in the Toronto Star.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:05pm by Information Architect.

Mike Lippman, a professor of Classics at the University of Arizona, is featured in an article about marathon readings on Insidehighered.com.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:21pm by .

This Thursday's poem at 3 Quarks Daily is full of puns with a classical theme:

The Agamemnon Rag

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

Read Mary Beard's review of two new books on Hannibal at The Times Literary Supplement.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:09pm by Information Architect.

"Eric Dugdale, associate professor of classics at Gustavus Adolphus College, received the 2011 Faculty Scholarly Achievement Award on May 7 at the College’s Honors Day Convocation." Read more at the Gustavus Adolphus Blog.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 12:57am by .

The complete financial statement for fiscal year 2009 - 2010 is now available. Click here to download it as a pdf, or go to the Financial Statements page to view current and previous statements.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 4:07pm by .

Audiences are invited to get intimate with the action in the second instalment of a fresh take on Camus' 'Caligula.'

"As many countries in the world struggle to depose tyrants, a timely play is taking to a Bangkok stage, transporting audiences to ancient Rome to unseat an emperor who has just elected his horse as prime minister. Fancy a stab?" Read more in The Bangkok Post …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"'Heracles to Alexander the Great: Treasures from the Royal Capital of Macedon, a Hellenic Kingdom in the Age of Democracy' is as crowded with objects as its title is with ideas. The Ashmolean manages to cram in about 500 objects, discovered in the royal tombs and palaces of Aegae (modern-day Vergina in the north of Greece), most of which are being displayed for the very first time." Read more at The Wall Street Journal.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 2:11am by Information Architect.

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