Summer 2018 Seminar on Material Culture: Nominations for Graduate Student Participants

Call for Nominations

The Use of Art and Material Culture in Scholarship and Teaching

A Seminar in Material Culture for Graduate Students in Classics and Ancient History

Directed by Professors Antony Augoustakis and Daniel Leon

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

21 May – 29 June 2018

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL

Supported by generous grants from the Leon Levy Foundation and the School of Literatures, and Cultures and Linguistics of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) invites doctoral programs in Classics or Ancient History to nominate a student to participate in a 6-week seminar that will introduce participants to the use of material culture in their scholarship and teaching. The aim of the seminar is to familiarize students with archaeological material that goes hand in hand with the historical and literary records, and how to incorporate such evidence into historical or philological research. This will be the third of three planned seminars with the same purpose, although each had a different focus.  The first took place at the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2016, and the second at Emory University in 2017.

Background. Despite new awareness of the scope of material evidence, and the ready availability of excellent images, all too often literary scholars treat images as decoration or illustration, while historians exploit the material record only gingerly. Probably more important than “literature” was the oral tradition, and the essential web of images that arose from it. Conversely, it has been wisely said of archaeology that it is a branch of ancient history.

This seminar offers students an opportunity to engage with the material record on a daily basis. Over the six weeks, every effort will be made to introduce the widest range of possibilities encountered in the archaeological record. Not only pottery and sculpture in bronze and marble will be considered, but also works in precious or exotic materials like ivory, gold, silver, amber, gems, glass, faience, and colored stones. Questions of manufacture and circulation will predominate: how these objects were made, by whom, for whom, why, and how to recognize them in the literary, historical and epigraphic record.

Resources and Faculty. Participants will have access to the University’s two teaching and research museums which hold extensive Greek and Roman collections. The Krannert Art Museum has a fine collection of Attic vases dating from the middle Archaic to the early Classical periods (http://kam.illinois.edu/collection/ancient/), published as a fascicule in the Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (USA, fasc. 24, 1989). The Spurlock’s Museum Workman Gallery of the Ancient Mediterranean Cultures features an extensive collection of artifacts (pottery, sculpture, coins) from Greece and Rome, as well as an incomparable collection of plaster casts reproducing the whole Parthenon frieze, the Ara Pacis and numerous individual sculptures (http://www.spurlock.illinois.edu/exhibits/permanent/med/).

Furthermore, the Classics Library Collection is among the three largest libraries of its kind in the nation, and one of the most important in the world (http://www.library.illinois.edu/clx/). The collection was initially enriched by the acquisition of the libraries of Dittenberger and Vahlen. Perhaps more than any other American institution of higher learning, the University of Illinois has tied its academic enterprise to the cultivation of its research library, and the Classics collection is one of its jewels: it is autonomous (all books and journals located in one space), on the second floor of the Main Library, adjacent to the primary Reading Room and the Main Stacks.

The course is co-ordinated by Professors Antony Augoustakis and Daniel Leon together with a group of scholars from the University and neighboring schools: Professor Susan Rotroff (Greek Archaeology, Washington University in St. Louis), Professor Sinclair Bell (Etruscan and Roman Archaeology, Northern Illinois University), Professor James Dengate (Greek Archaeology and Numismatics, UIUC), Professor Susan Frankenberg (Coordinator of Museum Studies, UIUC), Dr. Katherine Kreindler (Etruscan Archaeology, UIUC), Professor John Senseney (Greek and Roman Architecture, UIUC), Dr. Maureen Warren (Curator of European and American Art, Krannert Art Museum, UIUC).

Proximity to Chicago and St. Louis will allow participants to benefit from two excursions to visit the Art Institute of Chicago and the St. Louis Art Museum in order to study additional artifacts.

Schedule. The seminar is structured in broadly chronological terms, from Greece and the Near East to Rome and the West, including lectures on museum studies and modern technological advances. Three two-hour classes are planned around an over-arching theme each week, outlined in the synopsis. Additional two-hour sessions will provide students with guided study regarding their projects. Excursions to local artists’ workshops and to Chicago/St. Louis are planned for the end of each week.  Click here for a synopsis of the schedule.

Expectations of Students. Students will be evaluated based on a combination of exercises on each week’s instruction and a larger research project developed on an individual basis. We expect students to identify a project that suits their interests and uses University of Illinois resources. Each student will pursue their project under the supervision of one of the leading discussants in the seminar and in collaboration with Professors Augoustakis and Leon. The seminar will include mini-presentations on objects from the collections as well as on the individual projects of the students. At the conclusion of the seminar the directors will submit a written report to each student’s home department, assessing the student’s progress in working with material culture.

Logistics and Funding. Students selected for the seminar will be offered free accommodation at the University of Illinois (furnished apartments). Bus service is provided for transportation to the Museums and classrooms/library. As a campus of about 50,000 students, options for food and entertainment are many and multicultural. The University is located 130 miles south of Chicago. Champaign-Urbana is accessible by airplane (University of Illinois Willard airport, serviced by American Airlines and United with several daily flights to and from Chicago and Dallas), as well as Amtrak trains and numerous bus routes. In addition, thanks to the generosity of the Leon Levy Foundation, the SCS will provide a stipend of up to $2,000 to cover the cost of travel to and from Illinois, and modest out of pocket expenses. The SCS believes that these arrangements will offset many but by no means all of the costs of attendance at the seminar.

Nomination Process. Each doctoral program may nominate only one student for the seminar. The focus of the student’s academic work should be classical languages, literatures, and/or history and not archaeology or other areas of material culture. Preference will be given to graduate students who are still taking coursework or in the early stages of writing their dissertation. Nominators should elicit from potential applicants a CV and a statement of the value that the student expects to derive from attending the seminar, choose one applicant to nominate, and forward the CV and statement to the SCS Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org), along with a brief endorsement. The student’s statement should be 500 to 700 words in length and should describe how the seminar would advance the applicant’s education and scholarly interests. The student him or herself should also email the Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org) with full name, mailing address, phone number.

A committee consisting of Professors Antony Augoustakis and Daniel Leon as co-chairs and Professors Mary English (SCS Vice President for Education) and Donald Mastronarde (SCS VP for Publications and Research) will select participants from ten different academic institutions and a variety of countries of origin. Although many applicants from North America are expected, students from all countries are equally welcome. Reasonable fluency in English is the only requirement.

Nominations by departments and emails from student nominees including their full contact information should be submitted electronically to xd@classicalstudies.org no later than 15 January 2018. The SCS will announce the decisions of the selection committee in early February 2018. Questions about the seminar program may be directed to Professor Augoustakis at aaugoust@illinois.edu or by telephone at 217 333 7327.

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(Photo: Marble Head of Empress Fausta. Gift of Betty Campanile, 1982.07.000. Image courtesy of the Spurlock Museum, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)


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Please visit our Annual Meeting page for updates:

https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2018-annual-meeting

As of this morning, we know of just one panel that is completely cancelled.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 01/04/2018 - 5:14am by Helen Cullyer.
Boston Skyscrapers

The SCS Committee on Diversity in the Profession invites annual meeting attendees to a reception on

Thursday January 4, 2018 at 9pm

St. George B, Westin Copley Place

Meet the committee members and learn about the new committee.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/26/2017 - 8:28pm by Helen Cullyer.
Boston Skyscrapers

The SCS Advisory Board of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae Fellowship is holding a reception on

Thursday January 4, 2018 at 6pm

Atrium Lounge, Marriott Copley Place

All interested in the TLL and the NEH-funded TLL Fellowship Program, administered annually by SCS, are invited to attend.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/26/2017 - 8:09pm by Helen Cullyer.

Ongoing discussions in academic circles about the value and purpose of 3-D immersive technologies have lately been sharpened by the emergence of consumer-ready VR and inexpensive game engines, especially Unity. One side of that discussion asserts that, in an academic context, these technologies are primarily valuable to the extent that they advance serious scientific and data visualization research. Others maintain that game design and “play” more broadly are equally important, and can transform how we teach many subjects. One approach does not exclude the other, of course, but my own experience has convinced me of the exciting potential of the latter, play-based, mode. For classicists, interdisciplinary as we are, the 3-D interactive future of research and teaching beyond textbooks holds important opportunities, especially if we take an active, collaborative role in shaping that future.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 12/26/2017 - 12:00am by David Fredrick.

We have updated our resource on teacher certification requirements in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia.

Read more here.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/19/2017 - 10:41pm by Helen Cullyer.

"Unguentarıuma terracotta vessel form and other related vessels ın the hellenıstıc, roman and early byzantıne medıterranean - an ınternatıonal symposıum"

May 17-18, 2018 / Izmir, Turkey
with an excursion to Lesbos, Greece on May 19-21, 2018

Dear Colleagues,

The Izmir Center of the Archaeology of Western Anatolia (EKVAM) is glad to inform you that an international symposium on unguentarium, a terracotta vessel form in the Hellenistic, Roman and early Byzantine Mediterranean, will take place on May 17-18, 2017 at the Dokuz Eylül University (DEU) in Izmir, Turkey. An unguentarium (plural “unguentaria”) is a small ceramic or glass bottle, found in relatively large quantities in the entire Mediterranean, from Spain to Syria and Egypt to France, where they were produced between the early Hellenistic and early Medieval periods. The terracotta version of this form is a typically narrow-necked vessel shape, topped with a slender neck and a thin-lipped rim. The base of these vessels can be in some cases rounded or fusiform -- in which case it is not self-standing -- or flat-bottomed. Its shape was changed in several periods, but especially during the mid second century B.C. Beside the common term unguentarium, which is a modern invitation, this vessel type was also called as “balsamare”, “ampulle”, “lacramarium” or “flacon” etc.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/19/2017 - 9:04am by Erik Shell.
Interiority in Roman Literature
Pacific Rim Roman Literature Seminar 32
University of Sydney, 11 to 13 July 2018
 
The thirty-second meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at the University of Sydney from 11 to 13 July 2018. The theme for the 2018 conference will be interiority in Roman literature.
 
Papers are invited to explore Roman literature’s inner voices, visions and narratives; psychologies; inner lives; the ‘inward turn’ of Roman literature at various periods, such as the first and fourth centuries; interior spaces; inner sanctums and circles of power. Roman literature is conceived of as the literature of Roman world from its earliest beginnings to the end of antiquity. The theme may be interpreted broadly, and papers on other topics will also be considered.
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:12pm by Erik Shell.

SOCRATICA IV

After the Socratica Conferences (Socratica 2005, held in Senigallia, Socratica 2008, held in Napoli, and Socratica 2012 held in Trento), and the respective proceedings published in 2008, 2010 and 2013, we are pleased to announce the SOCRATICA IV Conference to be held in Buenos Aires on November 13-16, 2018 at the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
 
We invite submissions of proposals related to any of the following areas: 
 
a) The figure and thought of Socrates
b) Socratic and anti-Socratic literature, i.e. texts and fragments of Ancient Comedy, first-generation Socratics, Polycrates, Isocrates and so on
c) Philosophy and thought of the first-generation Socratics
d) Historiographical problems related to the Socratic circle 
e) Key notions, such as sophistes and philosophos, before, during, and after Socrates time

Call for papers 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:08pm by Erik Shell.

Diversity and Uniformity in the Archaic Greek World

On 23-25 May 2018, leading scholars from around the world will gather at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire in the United States to explore diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world. All of the speakers are contributors to the forthcoming Oxford History of the Archaic Greek World (OHAGW), edited by Paul Cartledge (Cambridge University) and Paul Christesen (Dartmouth College).  OHAGW will provide detailed studies of 29 sites, sanctuaries, and regions in Greece during the Archaic period. Each essay in OHAGW will be built around the same set of eleven rubrics, so that it will be possible to read either vertically (reading a complete study of a single site) or horizontally (reading, for example, about the economic history of a number of different sites). Taken together, these studies will add unprecedented depth and subtlety to our evidence for and understanding of diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world.

The speakers at this conference will discuss how the particular site, sanctuary or region about which they are writing for OHAGW contributes to our understanding of diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world. The schedule of the conference – all sessions of which will be plenary – is such as to leave a considerable amount of time for questions, answers, and general discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:02pm by Erik Shell.

The SCS Outreach Panel is soliciting questions to address at the SCS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Click on this link to submit your questions about outreach activities of the SCS: https://goo.gl/forms/KWrE8y45PhKDUjFY2

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 1:44pm by Erik Shell.

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