Summer 2018 Seminar on Material Culture: Nominations for Graduate Student Participants

Call for Nominations

The Use of Art and Material Culture in Scholarship and Teaching

A Seminar in Material Culture for Graduate Students in Classics and Ancient History

Directed by Professors Antony Augoustakis and Daniel Leon

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

21 May – 29 June 2018

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL

Supported by generous grants from the Leon Levy Foundation and the School of Literatures, and Cultures and Linguistics of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) invites doctoral programs in Classics or Ancient History to nominate a student to participate in a 6-week seminar that will introduce participants to the use of material culture in their scholarship and teaching. The aim of the seminar is to familiarize students with archaeological material that goes hand in hand with the historical and literary records, and how to incorporate such evidence into historical or philological research. This will be the third of three planned seminars with the same purpose, although each had a different focus.  The first took place at the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2016, and the second at Emory University in 2017.

Background. Despite new awareness of the scope of material evidence, and the ready availability of excellent images, all too often literary scholars treat images as decoration or illustration, while historians exploit the material record only gingerly. Probably more important than “literature” was the oral tradition, and the essential web of images that arose from it. Conversely, it has been wisely said of archaeology that it is a branch of ancient history.

This seminar offers students an opportunity to engage with the material record on a daily basis. Over the six weeks, every effort will be made to introduce the widest range of possibilities encountered in the archaeological record. Not only pottery and sculpture in bronze and marble will be considered, but also works in precious or exotic materials like ivory, gold, silver, amber, gems, glass, faience, and colored stones. Questions of manufacture and circulation will predominate: how these objects were made, by whom, for whom, why, and how to recognize them in the literary, historical and epigraphic record.

Resources and Faculty. Participants will have access to the University’s two teaching and research museums which hold extensive Greek and Roman collections. The Krannert Art Museum has a fine collection of Attic vases dating from the middle Archaic to the early Classical periods (http://kam.illinois.edu/collection/ancient/), published as a fascicule in the Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (USA, fasc. 24, 1989). The Spurlock’s Museum Workman Gallery of the Ancient Mediterranean Cultures features an extensive collection of artifacts (pottery, sculpture, coins) from Greece and Rome, as well as an incomparable collection of plaster casts reproducing the whole Parthenon frieze, the Ara Pacis and numerous individual sculptures (http://www.spurlock.illinois.edu/exhibits/permanent/med/).

Furthermore, the Classics Library Collection is among the three largest libraries of its kind in the nation, and one of the most important in the world (http://www.library.illinois.edu/clx/). The collection was initially enriched by the acquisition of the libraries of Dittenberger and Vahlen. Perhaps more than any other American institution of higher learning, the University of Illinois has tied its academic enterprise to the cultivation of its research library, and the Classics collection is one of its jewels: it is autonomous (all books and journals located in one space), on the second floor of the Main Library, adjacent to the primary Reading Room and the Main Stacks.

The course is co-ordinated by Professors Antony Augoustakis and Daniel Leon together with a group of scholars from the University and neighboring schools: Professor Susan Rotroff (Greek Archaeology, Washington University in St. Louis), Professor Sinclair Bell (Etruscan and Roman Archaeology, Northern Illinois University), Professor James Dengate (Greek Archaeology and Numismatics, UIUC), Professor Susan Frankenberg (Coordinator of Museum Studies, UIUC), Dr. Katherine Kreindler (Etruscan Archaeology, UIUC), Professor John Senseney (Greek and Roman Architecture, UIUC), Dr. Maureen Warren (Curator of European and American Art, Krannert Art Museum, UIUC).

Proximity to Chicago and St. Louis will allow participants to benefit from two excursions to visit the Art Institute of Chicago and the St. Louis Art Museum in order to study additional artifacts.

Schedule. The seminar is structured in broadly chronological terms, from Greece and the Near East to Rome and the West, including lectures on museum studies and modern technological advances. Three two-hour classes are planned around an over-arching theme each week, outlined in the synopsis. Additional two-hour sessions will provide students with guided study regarding their projects. Excursions to local artists’ workshops and to Chicago/St. Louis are planned for the end of each week.  Click here for a synopsis of the schedule.

Expectations of Students. Students will be evaluated based on a combination of exercises on each week’s instruction and a larger research project developed on an individual basis. We expect students to identify a project that suits their interests and uses University of Illinois resources. Each student will pursue their project under the supervision of one of the leading discussants in the seminar and in collaboration with Professors Augoustakis and Leon. The seminar will include mini-presentations on objects from the collections as well as on the individual projects of the students. At the conclusion of the seminar the directors will submit a written report to each student’s home department, assessing the student’s progress in working with material culture.

Logistics and Funding. Students selected for the seminar will be offered free accommodation at the University of Illinois (furnished apartments). Bus service is provided for transportation to the Museums and classrooms/library. As a campus of about 50,000 students, options for food and entertainment are many and multicultural. The University is located 130 miles south of Chicago. Champaign-Urbana is accessible by airplane (University of Illinois Willard airport, serviced by American Airlines and United with several daily flights to and from Chicago and Dallas), as well as Amtrak trains and numerous bus routes. In addition, thanks to the generosity of the Leon Levy Foundation, the SCS will provide a stipend of up to $2,000 to cover the cost of travel to and from Illinois, and modest out of pocket expenses. The SCS believes that these arrangements will offset many but by no means all of the costs of attendance at the seminar.

Nomination Process. Each doctoral program may nominate only one student for the seminar. The focus of the student’s academic work should be classical languages, literatures, and/or history and not archaeology or other areas of material culture. Preference will be given to graduate students who are still taking coursework or in the early stages of writing their dissertation. Nominators should elicit from potential applicants a CV and a statement of the value that the student expects to derive from attending the seminar, choose one applicant to nominate, and forward the CV and statement to the SCS Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org), along with a brief endorsement. The student’s statement should be 500 to 700 words in length and should describe how the seminar would advance the applicant’s education and scholarly interests. The student him or herself should also email the Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org) with full name, mailing address, phone number.

A committee consisting of Professors Antony Augoustakis and Daniel Leon as co-chairs and Professors Mary English (SCS Vice President for Education) and Donald Mastronarde (SCS VP for Publications and Research) will select participants from ten different academic institutions and a variety of countries of origin. Although many applicants from North America are expected, students from all countries are equally welcome. Reasonable fluency in English is the only requirement.

Nominations by departments and emails from student nominees including their full contact information should be submitted electronically to xd@classicalstudies.org no later than 15 January 2018. The SCS will announce the decisions of the selection committee in early February 2018. Questions about the seminar program may be directed to Professor Augoustakis at aaugoust@illinois.edu or by telephone at 217 333 7327.

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(Photo: Marble Head of Empress Fausta. Gift of Betty Campanile, 1982.07.000. Image courtesy of the Spurlock Museum, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)


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Ancient Philosophy Society
18th Annual Independent Meeting

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
April 26-April 29, 2018

Honoring the richness of the American and European philosophical traditions, the Ancient Philosophy Society encourages submissions from a variety of interpretive perspectives. Phenomenological, postmodern, Anglo-American, Straussian, Tübingen School, hermeneutic, psychoanalytic, queer, feminist, and any other interpretations of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical and literary works are welcome.
Please submit papers by e-mail attachment to APS2018@emory.edu. Deadline: November 22, 2017. The author’s name, institution, and references pertaining to the identity of the author must be omitted from the paper, notes, and bibliography. The e-mail accompanying the submission must include the author’s name, the title of the paper, address, telephone, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:24am by Erik Shell.

The Annual Meeting page for our 150th meeting in San Diego, CA is now live. This page will be the hub for all news and developments for our 2019 meeting, which marks our historic Sesquicentennial.

Listed there already are the Calls for Abstracts for the Affiiliated Group Panels, the Organizer-Refereed Panels, and the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 2:29pm by Erik Shell.

Seventh Annual Tennessee Undergraduate Classics Research Conference--Call for Papers

This conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world, with paper sessions being divided by theme based on the papers accepted. Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, art, etc.) or a related field, including interdisciplinary topics or topics in Egyptology and the ancient Near East. Examples range from an analysis of the rhetoric of a Demosthenic speech to a report of the findings of a current excavation to a commentary on the hybridization of style in Pompeian wall painting (this is not an exhaustive list).

Submission of Abstracts

Abstracts are due by 5:00pm EST on Monday, November 13, 2017 to clasclub@utk.edu. You must also fill out and submit an information sheet via Google Forms. The Google Form can be found here. Notifications of acceptance will be sent on Friday, December 1, 2017. Click here for a guide for abstract submissions.

Abstract Details

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:24am by Erik Shell.

Thresholds in Literature and the Arts
International Conference

Centre for Classical Studies – Centre for Comparative Studies
School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon (Portugal)
June 2018, 7-8

During the last century the concept of “liminality” has gained increasing attention in many disciplines, from psychology to anthropology, from philosophy to literary and cultural studies. But the state that the word defines is much older than the word itself. Suffice it to think of the myths, heroes and gods related to the katabasis and other forms of passage in ancient Greek and Latin cultures, to get a hint of the historical depth of such a concept.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 8:56am by Erik Shell.

August 2012: a Latinist, a scholar of Chinese martial arts novels, a classical Persianist, a historian of early Vietnam, a Renaissance literature scholar, an archaeologist of pre-modern Malaya, and a post-colonial literature specialist assembled in New Haven. It was just like a gathering of Marvel’s AvengersTM, but with less spandex. We gathered not to save the world, but to read it: in their Olympian wisdom (to mix mythological universes), President Richard Levin of Yale University and President Tan Chorh Chuan of National University of Singapore had decided to establish Yale-NUS College, a jointly founded small liberal arts college located in Singapore. Their goal was to create a new model for higher education in a globalized future (or something Davos-y like that): our job was to design and eventually teach an interdisciplinary humanities first-year course called “Literature and Humanities,” one half of a yearlong Great Works sequence.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am by Mira Seo.

Cyprus: a Place and Topos in Ancient Literature

Whether it was love, war, struggle or simply a breathtaking landscape that inspired authors in antiquity, Cyprus had it all. Greek and Latin literature abounds with references to the island: the land of kings and heroes and, most importantly, the birthplace of Aphrodite/Venus, Cyprus offers to ancient authors numerous sources of inspiration - Teucer, Evagoras, Pygmalion, Cinyras, Myrrha, Adonis, to name but a few. At the same time, Cyprus the place has a unique cultural identity, shaped under the multiple interrelations, contacts and assimilations of indigenous Cypriot, Greek, and Eastern elements. Similar is the shaping of the linguistic landscape of the island.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 2:38pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Applications to the 2018-2019 Shohet Scholars Grant Program for Research on the Ancient Mediterranean
by International Catacomb Society

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2018-2019. Submission deadline is January 15, 2018.

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 2:25pm by Erik Shell.

Nature and the Divine in Ancient Greek Thought

Discussions of ancient Greek conceptions of nature and the divine have not been as plentiful recently as they once were.  This may be due to disciplinary demarcations.  There is no lack of discussion of either topic, of course, but discussion of the relations between the two concepts, or the lack thereof, is welcome if not needed.  

The interdisciplinary conference, Nature and the Divine in Ancient Greek Thought, will take place March 2-4, 2018 at the University of South Florida Tampa campus.   The conference is sponsored by the University of South Florida Interdisciplinary Center for Hellenic Studies and the University of South Florida Department of Philosophy. There will be three plenary lectures: one by Simon Trépanier of the University of Edinburgh, author of Empedocles: An Interpretation, another by Mor Segev of the University of South Florida, author of Aristotle on Religion, and a third by Wilson Shearin of the University of Miami, author of The Language of Atoms.

If you wish to participate please send an abstract of 1-2 pages by December 17, 2017 to eturner1@usf.edu.  If submissions permit, there will be a session featuring the work of graduate and undergraduate students.  Notification regarding acceptance of abstracts will be made by January 7, 2018.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 10:43am by Erik Shell.

WELCOME TO THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PHARMACY AND MEDICINE IN ANCIENT EGYPT

On behalf of the Organizing and Scientific Committees, we are pleased to invite you to attend the Third International Conference on Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt to be held in Barcelona on October 25th and 26th 2018.

We are highly honoured to organize this new conference and continuing with the one organized some years ago for the study and presentation of new research advances in these topics.

This meeting will display most recent Pharmaceutical and Medical studies on human and animal remains and organic and plant material from ancient Egypt, together with discussions on textual and iconographical evidences related to this subject to evaluate the knowledge and advance on the Pharmacy, Veterinary and Medicine in Ancient Egypt.

The Conference program combines plenary sessions, oral communications and posters, and discussions which will permit to establish interdisciplinary collaborations between researchers and research groups that propose breakthrough studies on Pharmacy and Medicine in Antiquity.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Barcelona in 2018 and to enjoy the Conference and our lovely Mediterranean city.

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 10/03/2017 - 12:26pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers
Pliny’s Epistolary Intertextuality

Department of Classics and Philosophy, University of Cyprus
Friday 11th – Saturday 12th May 2018

Dr Spyridon Tzounakas and Dr Margot Neger are pleased to announce the International Conference “Pliny’s Epistolary Intertextuality”, which will be held in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus (11 – 12 May 2018).

Although recent years have seen a sharp increase in the number of studies that deal with Pliny’s intertextual and intergeneric relations (especially with Cicero, Tacitus, Quintilian, Martial and Catullus), there is still a lot of room for research in this area. This conference invites papers that explore any aspect of Pliny’s intertextuality in his Letters and welcomes various approaches.

Confirmed keynote speaker: Prof. Roy Gibson, University of Manchester, UK

Papers: The language of the conference is English. The time allocated for a paper is 20-25 minutes, with a further 5-10 minutes allowed for questions or discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/03/2017 - 12:09pm by Erik Shell.

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