"Thirty Years of the Jeweled Style" Deadline Extended

The Organizer Refereed Panel "Thirty Years of the Jeweled Style" has extended its deadline for abstract submission to March 5th.

See the original CFP here: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2017/150/call-abstracts-thir...

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Detail of Thalia from the Sarcophagus of the Muses, late 2nd century CE, Thassian marble, Archaeological Museum of Ostia. Photo taken by Krishni Burns, unpublished.

This blog entry is the first in a new series, Letters from CAMP, that will appear throughout the year and explore the various practicalities and benefits of the performance of ancient drama in its many forms.

Two years ago at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, a Senior Scholar of great distinction stood in the middle of a room crowded with many of the finest minds in classical scholarship, looked around, and said loudly, “Look at all these f**king a**holes.”  To the best of my knowledge, this was a first. Most scholars have been tempted to say the same when faced with a crowd of SCS conference goers, but most are a bit more circumspect in their language. 

In this instance, context is everything. The lady in question was performing the part of Poseidon, reworked in a modern aesthetic, at a staged reading of Aristophanes’ Birds organized by the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance (CAMP) in conjunction with Stanford Classics in Theater. Rather than gasping in shock, the audience laughed and applauded.  In the context of comedy, it’s possible to say what everyone might be thinking, with no harm done and no bones broken. 

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/11/2018 - 4:25pm by Krishni Burns.

Medea on the Contemporary Stage and Screen

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
Nov. 9-11, 2018, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA

In recent years, the afterlives of Greek tragedy have received special attention in the rapidly expanding field of classical reception studies. With reincarnations ranging from Japanese Noh theater to the Mexican screen, Euripides’ Medea is now more than ever a truly global “classic.” The time is ripe for dedicated focus on Medea and its traditions in contemporary theater and film.

The panel organizers (Zina Giannopoulou, University of California, Irvine; Jesse Weiner, Hamilton College) invite proposals for papers on receptions of Euripides’ Medea on the contemporary stage and screen, to be presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association. The conference will take place Nov. 9-11, 2018 at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA. Questions papers might address include but are not limited to:

  • Medea assumes many roles in Euripides’ play, from abject suppliant to dea ex machina. How do recent adaptations of Medea portray Medea’s inherent theatricality?

  • How have different translations of Medea affected the performance of the play?

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/11/2018 - 11:06am by Erik Shell.

I Congreso Internacional Inovação Docente – Instrumentos e Ferramentas na Investigação das Línguas Clássicas / Inovación docente. Instrumentos y herramientas en la investigación de las Lenguas Clásicas

Centro de Estudos Clássicos (CEC-FLUL)
Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)
3 y 4 de diciembre 2018

En la mayor parte de los países occidentales los Estudios Clásicos se encuentran hoy en una prolongada crisis que ha significado la reducción, más o menos drástica, del número de alumnos tanto en la Enseñanza Secundaria como en la Superior. En este contexto urge repensar los procesos de enseñanza y aprendizaje y para este fin se convoca el I Congreso Innovación Docente – Instrumentos y Herramientas en la Investigación de las Lenguas Clásicas, encuentro científico que pretende clarificar el estado de la cuestión pero también estimular y divulgar nuevos abordajes de la enseñanza de las lenguas y culturas clásicas.

Organizado por el "Centro de Estudos Clássicos" de la Facultad de Letras de la Universidad de Lisboa, este congreso se realiza en colaboración con varias universidades ibéricas, a saber:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/11/2018 - 10:13am by Erik Shell.

SCS Member Scott Johnson has received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. 

"Johnson’s Guggenheim project is a cultural biography of the language of Syriac. This will be the first book of its kind in English. It attempts to trace the origins, flourishing, and legacy of Syriac as an actor between empires in the late ancient and early medieval worlds."

You can read the full press release here.

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Photo: "Park Avenue" by Patrick Nouhailler, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 04/11/2018 - 9:43am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

SCS has received a grant in the amount of $157,200 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the TLL Fellowship program for three years, from academic year 2019-20 through 2021-22. The program, administered by the SCS, provides a one-year research fellowship to a scholar to work on the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae in Munich, Germany.

We are extremely pleased by this news and hope members will benefit from this program for years to come.

Yelena Baraz, Project Director

Helen Cullyer, Executive Director, SCS

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/09/2018 - 11:16am by Erik Shell.
Dancers and musicians, tomb of the leopards, Monterozzi necropolis, Tarquinia, Italy. UNESCO World Heritage Site. Fresco a secco. Height (of the wall): 1.70 m. 475 BCE. from Le Musée absolu, Phaidon, 10-2012, photographer Yann Forget. CC By 1.0.

In the third post in our independent scholars series, Ann Patty discusses her late in life discovery of Latin and her love of learning, teaching, and promoting Classics. 

I began to learn Latin as I approached the age of 60. After the recession of 2008 my highly leveraged company forced me into early retirement. I had been an editor and publisher for thirty-five years, an all-consuming career that kept my mind engaged and provided me with a community, a passionate purpose and a strong identity. Suddenly all those things were taken away. I retreated full-time to my country house, also forfeiting my identity as a New Yorker. I became an exile. I had participated in the chattering classes my entire adult life. On my rural plot of land in the Hudson Valley, the only chattering to be heard was that of chipmunks and squirrels. I needed words.

Words were my first and perennial friends. I’ve kept word lists since I was a child, and I still do. When I discover a new word, I feel a surge of delight. Soon after my retirement I discovered the word concinnity—the harmonious arrangements of parts, especially in writing, an expression so beautiful it rises to the level of music. I knew Latin was behind that word, as it is behind two-thirds of our English words. Latin is the home base of English words and grammar. If words were my first love, grammar was my second, a stern mistress whom I had served happily for all my years as an editor.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/04/2018 - 4:37pm by Ann Patty.
CFP: 2018 SAGP Annual Meeting
October 19-21, 2018
Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA

Keynote Speaker: Nickolas Pappas

Panel Proposal Deadline: May 1

Paper Abstract Deadline: June 1

Submit abstracts and proposals to apreus@binghamton.edu.

Conference Website: http://christweedt.com/sagp.html

All participants must be members of the SAGP. To become a member, fill out the form linked to here and mail it to A. Preus, SAGP Philosophy, Binghamton University, 13902-6000.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/04/2018 - 8:16am by Erik Shell.

The deadline for submitting:

  • All proposals for panels, workshops, seminars, and roundtable discussions.
  • Reports from organizers of committee, organizer-refereed, and affiliated group panels who have issued their own CFPs.
  • Proposals for organizer-refereed panels for 2020.
  • Applications for new affiliated group charters and for renewals of current charters.

is next Monday, April 9th. Individual abstracts are due April 25th.

Anyone hoping to submit an abstract or another proposal can do so on our program submission website.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 04/04/2018 - 8:09am by Erik Shell.

(Provided by Roberta Berardi, Nicoletta Bruno, Martina Filosa, Luisa Fizzarotti)

We are delighted to share the Call for Papers for Prolepsis’ 3rd international Postgraduate Conference 
“Optanda erat oblivio”: Selection and Loss in Ancient and Medieval Literature
University of Bari, 20th-21st December 2018

Confirmed keynote speaker: Tiziano DORANDI (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Paris)

Prolepsis Association is delighted to announce its third international postgraduate conference whose theme will be the mechanisms of selection and loss in ancient and Medieval literary and historical texts. “Optanda erat oblivio” Seneca writes in benef. 5. 25. 2, referring to Tiberius’ wish for forgetfulness. We would like to use this quotation as a starting point for a discussion on the vast number of issues related to memory and oblivion in ancient and Medieval texts. This year the conference will be particularly keen on - but not limited to - the following topics:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 04/03/2018 - 12:45pm by Erik Shell.

(Provided by David A. Reingold)

On Sun., March 25th, 2018, the College of Liberal Arts lost our dear colleague Professor Antonia Syson. Her friends and colleagues in the School of Languages and Cultures will remember Antonia for her passionate and intense dedication to all aspects of her work and for her exceptionally large laugh and cheerful whistling that brightened the hallways of Stanley Coulter.

Antonia received her BA with Honors from the University of Oxford in 1995, her MA in Latin from UC-Berkeley in 1997, and her PhD in Classics from UC-Berkeley in 2003. She joined the Classics faculty at Purdue in the School of Languages and Cultures in 2008. She authored the book Fama and Fiction in Vergil’s Aeneid, published in 2013 by Ohio State University Press. It was released in paperback last year. She was promoted with tenure in 2014. Antonia was a longtime chair of SLC’s community engagement project World Film Forum, and in 2014, Antonia was the lead coordinator on a grant from the Indiana Humanities Initiative that brought together K-12 and post-secondary teachers from across the state for the conference “Teaching the Past: Dissenting Histories in the Classroom.”

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 04/02/2018 - 2:57pm by Erik Shell.

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