TLL Fellowship 2021-2022 Application Cycle

TLL Fellowship 2021-2022 Application Cycle

Supported by a Generous Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

The Society for Classical Studies invites applications for a one-year Fellowship, tenable from July 2022 through June 2023, that will allow an American scholar to conduct lexicographical research at the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (TLL) Institute in Munich. Fellows at the TLL develop a broadened perspective of the range and complexity of the Latin language and culture from the classical period through the early Middle Ages, contribute signed articles to the Thesaurus, have the opportunity to participate in a collaborative international research project in a collegial environment, and work with senior scholars in the field of Latin lexicography.  The Fellowship carries a stipend in the amount of $60,000, an increase over prior years, and is made possible by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Before leaving for Munich, fellows receive up to $1,850 in additional funds to support training in Latin lexicography and (if necessary) German. Thanks to the Friends of George Goold Fund in the SCS’s Endowment for Classics Research and Teaching, Fellows may also request reimbursement of travel expenses for two return trips between North America and Munich, to enable the Fellow to take up the fellowship and to attend the annual SCS meeting.  In certain instances the TLL Fellowship Advisory Board may also authorize Goold Fund support for other research activities of a Fellow.  The incumbent Fellow may re-apply for a second year, but all applications will be judged on an equal footing.

Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents.  In addition, all applicants must have completed all PhD requirements, including submission of the PhD dissertation,by the date on which they submit their application materials.  Applicants who have completed all PhD requirements but have not yet had the degree conferred should provide a letter from their Director of Graduate Studies that states: (a) that all PhD requirements are complete; and (b) the date on which the degree will be conferred.  The opportunity to conduct lexicographical research and contribute articles to be published in the lexicon may be of special interest to scholars who are already established in tenure-track positions, as well as those who are just entering the profession.  The Fellowship offers valuable experience for scholars in a variety of specialties (e.g., Latin language and literature, Roman law, Roman history, the literature of early Christianity); although it is not limited to individuals working in Latin philology, applicants should possess a thorough familiarity with and a special interest in the Latin language, as well as advanced competence in Greek.  It is anticipated that applicants will already have a reading knowledge of German and will be willing to work toward proficiency in spoken German. Women and members of groups currently underrepresented in Classics are particularly encouraged to apply.

Applications should include a curriculum vitae, a statement of what benefits the applicant expects to derive from the Fellowship for his/her research and teaching, and the names of three referees, whom the applicant should ask to send supporting letters to the Executive Director of the Society for Classical Studies without further notice.  The candidate’s statement should address the two basic eligibility requirements (status of the candidate’s citizenship/residency and doctoral degree).  It will be in the candidate’s interest if at least one letter of recommendation can specifically address the candidate’s suitability for the Fellowship. Candidates will be considered by a selection committee appointed by the SCS’s TLL Fellowship Advisory Board.  That selection committee will choose a short-list of candidates to be invited for interview remotely in December 2021 January 2022 and the name of the successful candidate will be announced shortly thereafter.

Applications must be received by the deadline of Friday, November 12, 2021, at 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time. Applications should be submitted as e-mail attachments to Dr. Helen Cullyer, Executive Director, Society for Classical Studies, xd@classicalstudies.org.  A complete application will consist of five files sent as attachments.  The candidate is responsible for sending two of these documents: the statement and the curriculum vitae.  Each of the three referees should send his or her letter directly to the Executive Director.

If, for some reason, it is impossible to submit these materials electronically, please write to Dr. Cullyer at the e-mail address above or call her at 646-939-0435 for alternative instructions.  Visit the Publications and Research Division's page on the TLL for more information, or contact the Chairperson of the TLL Fellowship Advisory Board of the SCS:

Professor Yelena Baraz

ybaraz@princeton.edu

- See more at: https://classicalstudies.org/publications-and-research/thesaurus-linguae-latinae

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"An enigmatic message on a Roman gladiator's 1,800-year-old tombstone has finally been decoded, telling a treacherous tale. The epitaph and art on the tombstone suggest the gladiator, named Diodorus, lost the battle (and his life) due to a referee's error, according to Michael Carter, a professor at Brock University in St. Catharines, Canada. Carter studies gladiator contests and other spectacles in the eastern part of the Roman Empire." Read more at LiveScience.com…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/20/2011 - 1:25pm by Information Architect.

"Jacques A. Bailly, an associate professor of classics at the University of Vermont, is the department's director of graduate studies. He has also been the official pronouncer of words at the Scripps National Spelling Bee since 2003. He won the annual bee as an eighth grader in 1980." Read the interview with Prof. Bailly at The Chronicle of Higher Education's web site.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/16/2011 - 3:37pm by Information Architect.

"NATO refused to say Tuesday whether or not it would bomb ancient Roman ruins in Libya if it knew Moammar Gadhafi was hiding military equipment there. 'We will strike military vehicles, military forces, military equipment or military infrastructure that threaten Libyan civilians as necessary,' a NATO official in Naples told CNN, declining to give his name in discussing internal NATO deliberations." Read more at CNN World online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/14/2011 - 2:30pm by Information Architect.

The American Philological Association is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Ellen Bauerle of the University of Michigan Press as Editor, and Dr. Wells Hansen of Milton Academy as Assistant Editor, of Amphora, its Outreach publication, effective January 2012.

Ellen has for several years worked as the editor for classics and archaeology at the University of Michigan Press. She also oversees book production for the not-for-profit Michigan Classical Press, and in the past has created and sold ebooks on the web.  Recipient of a BA in Greek and English from Oberlin College, and an MA and PhD in Classics from the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, she has been an Eric P. Newman Fellow at the American Numismatic Society and Seymour Fellow at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  Ellen is delighted that Amphora is evolving to include the latest technologies, as additional ways of reaching its key constituencies among interested nonspecialists, scholars, teachers and students at the secondary level, and administrators.  

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 06/13/2011 - 6:27pm by .

Read Michael Collier's poem "Laelaps" and a critical essay about it by Lisa Russ Sparr at The Chronicle of Higher Education's web site.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/13/2011 - 2:29pm by Information Architect.

Got Latin? Got Greek?

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Fri, 06/10/2011 - 2:42pm by .

Delivered by Charlie Bridge (Class of 2011), a Classics Concentrator, at Harvard Commencement on May 27:

Rota Fortunae

Praeses Faust; Decani Professoresque sapientissimi; familiae, amici, et hospites honoratissimi; et tandem condiscipuli carissimi…salvete omnes!  Mihi voluptas magna atque honor altus est huius ceremoniae incipiendae in hoc theatro augusto Trecentensimo.  Nec solum conventum ultimum classis nostrae, anni duomillensimi et undecimi, sed etiam conventum trecentensimum et sexagensimum huius universitatis hodie celebramus. 

Hoc cum animadvertissem gaudebam, propter sensum singularem numeri trecenti et sexaginta.  Ne mihi quidem, litterarum antiquarum discipulo, latere potest orbem omnem in partes trecentas et sexaginta esse divisum.  Venit etiam in mentem orbis quidam praecipuus, qui vitas nostras hos quattuor annos rexit: Rota scilicet Fortunae Harvardiana.  Temporibus antiquis, rota signum erat levis mobilisque naturae fatorum – circuitus vel unus cladem felicissimis afferre atque miseros extollere potest.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/07/2011 - 7:05pm by Information Architect.

"One of the best preserved sculptures from Roman antiquity is about to make its Washington, D.C., debut. Host Scott Simon reports the Capitoline Venus will go on display next Wednesday at the National Gallery of Art." Read or listen to the story at NPR.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 06/05/2011 - 12:27pm by Information Architect.

"Listening to Cynthia Shelmerdine describe the writing on a Greek tablet from more than 3,000 years ago, it’s like she was looking over the scribe’s shoulder as he worked. She points out details and nuance of technique, the condition of the tablet and what it means, literally, and for the world of Greek archaeology." Read more …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 06/03/2011 - 3:58pm by Information Architect.

"An ancient Roman shipwreck nearly 2,000 years old may once have held an aquarium onboard capable of carrying live fish, archaeologists suggest." Read more at CBSNews.com.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/02/2011 - 5:37pm by Information Architect.

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