Tribute to R. Elaine Fantham

Please see the following tribute to R. Elaine Fantham, contributed by Prof. Alison Keith, Acting Chair, Dept. of Classics at the University of Toronto
-----
 
Dear Colleagues and friends – 
 
We were devastated to learn that R. Elaine Fantham, a giant in the field of classical scholarship and generous friend and mentor to generations of students and colleagues, died yesterday in Toronto at the age of 83. A member of the Classics department at Trinity College, in the University of Toronto, from 1968 to 1986, and again from 2000 to 2008 after her retirement from Princeton, Elaine was predeceased by her husband Peter, and is survived by her daughter Julia (grandchildren Peter, Alice, and Clare) and her son Roy (wife Jen and granddaughter Marley).

Born in Liverpool U.K. in May 1933, Elaine received her B.A. (first class in Literae Humaniores) and first graduate degree at Oxford University before returning to her home city as Leverhulme Research Fellow to earn her Ph.D. in 1965 with a dissertation on Plautus’ comedy Curculio, “The Boll-Weevil” (examined by R.G. Austin and O. Skutsch). Early training in the ways of roguery naturally equipped her for a meteoric rise in her chosen profession, and she held teaching posts all over the Anglo-American academy. She taught briefly at St Andrews University, as a fellow of St. Salvator’s College (1965-1966), before moving with her mathematician husband Peter to Indiana University in Bloomington. There she taught in the Department of Classics as a Visiting Lecturer (1966-1968), before moving again, in 1968, with their Scottish daughter Julia and American son Roy, to Toronto and Trinity College. There she taught for eighteen years (Assistant to Associate Professor 1968-1978, Professor 1978-86), in a college department celebrated for its collegiality and scholarship. She was welcomed right from the start by Mary White, as well as by the other members of the Classics contingent of that congenial college, including John Cole, Desmond Conacher, Alexander Dalzell, and George Grube. In retirement she returned to the college and was elected a Senior Fellow of Trinity College in September 2012.

During her professional years in Toronto, Elaine served on the editorial committee of Phoenix from 1976 to 1979; gave a series of papers across Canada on both the Atlantic and Western lecture tours sponsored by the Classical Association of Canada; and served as Vice-President of the Association from 1982-84, during which period she also served as Vice-President and then President of the Canadian Society for the History of Rhetoric (1983-1986). In 1996, she delivered the keynote lecture at the annual meeting of the CAC in St. Catharines, Ontario.

In addition to her valuable service to the Canadian academic community, Elaine was very active across North America, especially after moving to Princeton University in 1986, when she was appointed Giger Professor of Latin in the Department of Classics there. She enjoyed spells as a Visiting Professor of Classics at Ohio State University in Columbus OH (1983) and as Langford Visiting Professor at Florida State University in 2001; and in 1999-2000 she lectured for Phi Beta Kappa across the United States. She also contributed signal service to the American Philological Association, the largest professional classics association in the world, where she was an outstanding advocate for classical scholars and classics departments. She served as member, then chair, of the Goodwin Award Committee (1997-2000), and then, after her retirement from Princeton and return to Toronto in 2000, as President-Elect (2003) and President (2004) of the APA. In January 2009, she received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Philological Association in recognition of her superlative service to the profession.

After retiring from Princeton University in 2000, Elaine made her primary residence in Toronto, where her grown-up family lives, and she continued to make significant contributions to the research and teaching mission of the graduate department of Classics at the University of Toronto, where she had established her career. In the early years of the new millennium, she took on supplementary graduate teaching for the Toronto department in a wide range of M.A. and Ph.D. courses. In addition, and much more importantly, she was closely involved from the start of her retirement in mentoring across the country and around the world – not only senior graduate and undergraduate students but also friends and colleagues. She offered us all a model of the very highest standard of professional activity and collegiality. Her commitment to the Department, her colleagues and students – not only nationally and internationally, but also locally and provincially – was particularly valuable in this period, when she also served as the Honorary President of the Classical Association of Canada from 2001 to 2006. In May 2015 Elaine was honoured with the CAC Award of Merit.

Elaine continued to travel and lecture in the USA, Britain and Italy until recently, as she remained much in demand. Known both for the wide range and for the accessibility of her scholarship, Elaine was the grande dame of Latin studies in the English-speaking world, though it was not only amongst Anglo-American colleagues that she was celebrated. For her fluent Italian, German and French made her a very welcome guest-speaker throughout Europe as well. Outside of her home universities, Professor Fantham lectured across the United States for Phi Beta Kappa and presented lectures and conference papers around the world—including in Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Argentina, and Australia.

The author of seventeen books (including scholarly monographs, commentaries, editions and translations, and an omnibus of her selected articles) and over a hundred articles and book chapters, she also co-authored the standard textbook on women in antiquity and served as Associate Editor in Chief of the seven-volume Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome (2010). Many of us encountered Latin literature through her scholarship – the comedies of Plautus and Terence in her first book Comparative Studies in Republican Latin Literature (Toronto 1972), the plays of Seneca and poetry of Lucan and Ovid in later commentaries (Princeton 1982; Cambridge 1992 and 1998) respectively), and of course her magisterial Roman Literary Culture from Cicero to Apuleius (Baltimore 1996), expanded in a second edition (2012) to cover Latin letters from Plautus to Macrobius.

She herself said that she was drawn to the study of Classics because of a glamorous ad for a tonic wine, which featured a handsome longhaired young man in a tunic, riding past the Acropolis in a chariot with an equally alluring young woman. Although the modern professoriate may have been something of a disappointment by comparison, there is no question that Professor Fantham’s career was attended by glamour and acclaim. From 1996 on, she contributed short comments on classical topics to National Public Radio in the United States, where a select company of famous classicists has interested millions in the study of classical antiquity. Always generous with her time and attention to her chosen profession, Elaine gave a public and very human voice to our discipline as a commentator on NPR.

Elaine was a valuable member of the Classics community not only in her former departments but also in both her adoptive countries and on her adoptive continent for nearly fifty years, as a faculty member and staunchly supportive colleague, serving even in retirement as an active participant in the teaching and research mission of classical studies around the world. She provided a model of classical scholarship and personal engagement for generations of students, friends, and colleagues, and served as a warm and generous mentor to many in the profession.

Her generosity was a byword amongst her friends and former students, and her calendar even in retirement was always full of visits from colleagues, who took her out for concerts, cream teas and debauched dinners. A witty raconteur, loyal friend and brilliant cook, she remained excellent company to the end – on the radio, in the classroom, and over the dinner table. She will be sorely missed by everyone whose life she touched.

Ave atque vale – S.T.T.L

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Teachers of Classics have been impacted by hurricane Harvey and we are expecting reports from classicists in the Caribbean and continental US affected by Irma. 

ACL and SCS are launching a joint initiative that will help connect institutions in need with our members who are able to offer assistance.

If you are a teacher or faculty member at an institution whose academic programs have been interrupted, suspended, or impacted by the recent hurricanes, you can fill out the form linked below to request financial assistance that will accelerate the recovery of your classes and programs.

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

Once we have received your form, an ACL or SCS staff member will contact you to verify your identity and the nature of your request.  We will then publish verified requests on our websites and via our social media accounts so that individuals can reach out to institutions in need and offer direct financial help.  We feel that this is the quickest way of getting funds to the schools, colleges, and universities that need them.   

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 9:29am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

NEH is offering emergency grants and the opportunity for affected institutions to repurpose existing grants.

For more information, visit the NEH announcement page.

---

(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

"author.net"

a transdisciplinary conference on distributed authorship

UCLA, October 5-7 2018.
Co-Organizers, Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2018

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 2:12pm by Erik Shell.

Workshop: Creating a Digital Commentary for Teaching

Dickinson Latin Workshop
Saturday, October 21, 2017

Creating a Digital Commentary for Teaching
Bret Mulligan (Haverford College) and Chris Francese (Dickinson College)

Place: Dickinson College, Tome Hall 115, 10:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.

Do you write your own notes on Latin texts for your students? Are you frustrated with the limitations of Microsoft Word when it comes to parallel display of text, notes, and vocabulary? Now you can create attractive, usable reading texts online with vocabulary lists and notes simultaneously displayed, and the ability to include hyperlinks and add audio-visual material. This workshop will demonstrate and provide practice with a new plugin for the WordPress CMS that mimics the easy-to-read format of Dickinson College Commentaries. In addition, participants will see demonstrations of and practice using a variety of online tools that are helpful in the creation and annotation of reading texts: The Bridge for vocabulary list creation; DCC core vocabulary; Pleiades for geography; digitized grammars and reference works for simplifying annotations; Johan Winge’s macronizer; and others.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 9:37am by Erik Shell.

The Pearson Fellowship Committee invites nominations for the 2018-2019 Lionel Pearson Fellowship, which seeks to contribute to the education of American- and Canadian-trained classicists by providing for a year of study at an English or Scottish university. The competition is open to outstanding students who have completed in academic year 2016-2017, or will complete in academic year 2017-2018, a B.A. in Greek, Latin, Classics, or closely related fields at any American or Canadian college or university.  Faculty should nominate students by October 2, 2017.  Click here to see full instructions and details of the Fellowship.

---

(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 9:07am by Helen Cullyer.

3rd Annual University of Chicago Graduate Student Conference in Ancient Philosophy: Learning and Teaching in Ancient Thought

Date: April 13th-14th, 2018
Submission deadline: January 22nd, 2018

Keynote Speaker: David Bronstein (Georgetown University)

We invite graduate students to submit papers on learning and teaching in Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Potential topics include: the acquisition and transmission of knowledge, discovery, education, teachability, empirical vs. non-empirical forms of knowledge, innatism.

Approximately 5-6 presenters will be chosen. All papers accepted will be read in advance. Each presenter will have approximately an hour for discussion.

We will be able to provide partial compensation for travel expenses.

To propose a paper, send an abstract of 250-500 words to rhanlon11@uchicago.edu. To submit an abstract, email it with the subject heading “Ancient Philosophy Conference Submission.” In order to facilitate blind reviewing, pleased provide your contact information in the body of the email but do not include any identifying information in the attached document. Documents should be submitted in .doc, .docx, or .pdf form.

To submit your paper or ask any questions, please email Rory Hanlon at rhanlon11@uchicago.edu.

---

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/06/2017 - 8:59am by Erik Shell.

Registration for the Joint AIA/SCS Annual Meeting is now open!

To register online, click here. For other important information, such as the preliminary program, see the "Essential Links" section on our Annual Meeting page here.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 09/05/2017 - 10:05am by Erik Shell.
Partial reconstruction of one of the geminated temples which opened onto the forum, Glanum

As an amateur photographer and ancient history enthusiast, I have spent countless hours exploring ancient sites throughout the Mediterranean. In the process, I accumulated a very large number of photographs that I wanted to archive, edit, and share with the world. In 2009, after 3 years of traveling, I decided to start uploading my photos to Flickr. This photo-sharing site was founded in Canada in 2004, and acquired by Yahoo and moved to the US in 2005. As of fall 2016, the site reportedly had 122 million users in 63 countries and was the repository of 10 billion images, with a million more added on an average day. Size and popularity, however, were not the reasons why I chose Flickr. I wanted a photo site that would allow me to edit, annotate, organize, and store my images. I was also looking for a platform that would allow users to easily browse and download my photos if desired; Flickr offered all of this.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 09/05/2017 - 12:00am by Carole Raddato.

The Department of Classics, Philosophy, and Religion at the University of Mary Washington is saddened to announce the passing of Robert F. Boughner on August 30, at the age of 71.

Bob did his undergraduate studies in Classics at Duke, and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins. His favorite author to teach was Catullus.  He taught for several years at University of Maryland and worked as a Humanities administrator at the NEH before joining the Mary Washington faculty in 1983.  He was a highly popular and engaging lecturer, and taught a wide range of courses in Classical Civilization, Latin, and Greek.

Bob served as chair of the Department of Classics, Philosophy, and Religion from 1990 to 1996, when he left to become Dean of the American College in Athens. He returned to the United States as Chair of the Department of Humanities at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, from which he recently retired, moving to Takoma Park, MD.  We learned of his death from a friend and former student who relayed to us that it was unexpected.  Bob specified that he wanted no memorial or service, but we remember him with great fondness in CPR.

Former Executive Director Adam Blistein has asked us to add these remarks to the notice from Mary Washington

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 09/01/2017 - 11:35am by Erik Shell.

This is a reminder that the deadline for nominating a teacher for the SCS Excellence in Precollegiate Teaching Award is September 8th, 2017

Teachers, full- or part-time, of grades K-12 in schools in the United States and Canada who at the time of the application teach at least one class of Latin, Greek, or classics at the K-12 level are eligible. Membership in the SCS is not required.

To see a full description, visit the main webpage for the award here: https://classicalstudies.org/awards-and-fellowships/scs-awards-excellenc...

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/01/2017 - 11:25am by Erik Shell.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
"Motion and Migrancy in the Formation of Roman Literature
Classics in the News
The Digital Latin Library has publish
SCS Announcements
The SCS is proud to announce that it is now hosting the newest version of Joy

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy