Winners of 2014 Pedagogy Awards

In 2014 the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), founded in 1869 as the American Philological Association, awarded the second set of its Pedagogy Awards to three outstanding classics teachers. One of the major goals of the Society's recently and successfully completed capital campaign, Gatekeeper to Gateway: The Campaign for Classics in the Twenty-first Century, was to ensure that an inspiring, well trained teacher would be available for every school and college classics classroom. A subcommittee of the Joint Committee on the Classics in American Education, whose membership is selected from both the SCS and the American Classical League, reviewed thirteen applications requesting funds to support a variety activities that would improve their teaching and their students’ experiences in the classroom. The awards received by the three successful applicants are funded by income derived from the following contributions to the Campaign’s Research and Teaching Endowment: a major gift from an anonymous donor, a contribution from the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), and donations to the Friends of Zeph Stewart Fund.

Krystal Kubichek (Pennsauken High School, Pennsauken, NJ) was awarded $700 to attend the 2014 American Classical League Annual Institute in order to introduce attendees to the Classics Club program, and work on developing new promotional materials and activities for the Club, a program initiated under the umbrella of the ACL.  Click here to see the slides Ms. Kubichek presented at the 2014 ACL Institute.

Eric Mentges (Northwest Pennsylvania Collegiate Academy, Erie, PA) was awarded $1,000 to attend the 2014 Pedagogy Rusticatio of the North American Institute for Living Latin Studies as part of an effort to develop an oral Latin program at his school.

Patrick Owens (Wyoming Catholic College, Lander, WY) was awarded $740 to attend the Polis Institute’s intensive Greek program in Rome so that he can meet the demand for active-learning Greek classes to supplement his college's successful Latin program.  Read Prof. Owens' report on his participation in the Institute's program here

We are grateful to the selection committee (Bob Cape, Austin College; Ariana Traill, University of Illinois; and Nigel Nicholson, Reed College) for their careful review of the applications. In late 2014 the SCS will publish a call for applications for the 2015 Pedagogy Awards and Zeph Stewart Teacher Training Award. Applications will be due around March 1, 2015.

- See more at: http://apaclassics.org/awards-and-fellowships/2013/2013-pedagogy-award

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SAGP at Central and Pacific Divisions of the American Philosophical Association 2019

The Deadline for submission of papers for the SAGP panels at the Central and Pacific Division meetings of the APA is coming up soon: SEPTEMBER 1. Papers on any topic in Ancient Greek Philosophy, from the 6th century BCE to the 6th century CE, may be considered.

The 2019 Central Division Meeting will be 2/20/19 – 2/23/19 in Denver (Westin Downtown).

The 2019 Pacific Division Meeting will be 4/17/19 - 4/20/19 in Vancouver (Westin Bayshore).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 08/07/2018 - 11:02am by Erik Shell.
54th International Congress on Medieval Studies 2019
Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 9-12, 2019 
 
Bridging the Gap: Classicists and Medievalists in Continuous Dialogue
sponsored by the Classical Association for the Midwest and South. Organizer: Anise K. Strong

We are calling for papers that address ways in which medieval society, texts, and material culture perpetuate and adapt earlier traditions and practices from the ancient world. While papers concerning the reception of literary texts are welcome, we are particularly interested in papers that seek to make connections between ancient and medieval religious practices, local customs and traditions, artistic styles or types of media, persistent urban centers, enduring clans or families, social attitudes towards oppressed groups or minorities, or deliberate political and social echoes of earlier classical forms of government. We define “ancient” and “medieval” broadly in this context. Papers about the influence of Zoroastrianism on medieval writings about magic would be as enthusiastically greeted as papers about the use of ancient Greek political terms to describe Scandinavian Things. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 08/06/2018 - 10:47am by Erik Shell.
Vincenzo Camuccini. The Assassination of Julius Caesar, between 1804 and 1805. Oil on canvas. Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea.

Historical fiction based in the ancient world has long been a fruitful way to encourage the interest of non-specialists in the ancient world. These novels can also be used profitably to improve classroom pedagogy. I regularly assign a work of historical fiction in my online Intro to Ancient Rome course.  This summer, I opted for Steven Saylor’s most recent addition to his Gordianus series, The Throne of Caesar. My students in the summer are nearly all STEM majors who are looking to complete a core requirement, often while simultaneously working full-time. I need to select novels that are readable, follow Roman history accurately, and add dimension to the world and characters that they are studying. Ideally, the novel will also encourage the students to think about some aspect of Roman history from a new perspective.  For instance, Saylor’s Catalina’s Riddle tells the story of the Catilinarian conspiracy from the perspective of Catiline rather than Cicero and reminds students to pay close attention to Cicero’s presentation of the events. Robert Harris’s Imperium invites the reader into Cicero’s life at the very start of his career, to learn how Cicero became Cicero.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 08/02/2018 - 4:10pm by Jen Ebbeler.

From the ACLS (www.acls.org):

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) has posted Fellowship application guidelines and deadlines for the 2018-2019 application cycle.  Those relevant to Classicists include:

See the announcement and full fellowships list here.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 07/31/2018 - 11:21am by Erik Shell.
Fairfield University's Classical Studies Program is proud to invite you to a colloquium presenting original research in memory of our departed colleague, Professor Vincent J. Rosivach.
 
When: Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9 AM to 5 PM.
Where: Diffley Board Room, Bellarmine Hall, Fairfield University.
What: Guest speakers, a light breakfast, lunch, and a wine reception.
 
Confirmed Speakers:
 
Sean Gleason (If only Romans could write like Greeks: Some linguistic humor in Sallust's Catilina 8)
Judith Hallett  (Vilicus and Vilica in De Agri Cultura: the elder Cato's script for a farming couple)
David Konstan (Jesus’ Sense of Sin) 
R. James Long  (Why Fishacre? an apologia for a critical edition)
Mary Jean McNamara  (Achilles: The Internal Vision and Isolation of the Greek Hero in the Iliad)
Ann Raia (In Memoriam: Women Transcending Death in Ancient Rome)
Jennifer Roberts (Vincent Rosivach and Citizenship)
Marice Rose (From Polychrome to Monochrome: The Reception of Ancient Art by Contemporary Artists)
Katherine Schwab (Polychromy and the Parthenon Metopes)
Becky Sinos (Greek Mothers and Daughters and the Blessed Afterlife)
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 07/31/2018 - 8:09am by Erik Shell.

(Written by Ward Briggs)

Eleanor Jane Goltz Huzar (Granger) was born on June 15, 1922, in St. Paul, Minnesota to a physician, Dr. Edward Victor Goltz, and his wife, Claire O’Neill Goltz. Raised in a family of doctors, Eleanor had every intention of becoming a doctor herself, but found “I had no talent for it,” and instead pursued her love of Roman history at the University of Minnesota (A.B., 1943) and later at Cornell (M.A. 1945; Ph.D., 1948). Her dissertation focused on the political, economic, and religious relations between the Roman Republic and Ptolemaic Egypt and she pursued the subject in a series of articles in CJ and later in a well-received biography of Marc Antony (1978), which Erich Gruen called “the best biography of Antony available in English.” She received the Prix de Rome of the AAR for 1978-80 and continued to travel in Europe during the summers. She contributed a number of deeply researched and authoritative articles on early emperors and, of course, Egypt for the encyclopedic Festschrift, Aufstieg und Niedergang der Römischen Welt.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 07/27/2018 - 9:42am by Erik Shell.

National Humanities Fellowship

The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2019 through May 2020. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career and senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work may also apply. The Center does not support the revision of doctoral dissertations.

For full application information and information on the NHC visit their Fellowships page: https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/become-a-fellow/

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 07/27/2018 - 9:17am by Erik Shell.

Plato’s Parmenides

Paris, July 15th-20th 2019

The International Plato Society organizes a symposium on a single Platonic dialogue every three years. We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the XII Symposium Platonicum: Plato’s Parmenides.

The Symposium will take place July 15–20, 2019, in Paris. Although the dialogue has been the object of intense scholarly scrutiny, many issues remain to be explored. Submissions on any aspect of the dialogue, including its presocratic sources as well as later reception, will be considered. We also would like to encourage papers that address issues in the dialogue’s second half since it has received relatively less attention.

We welcome abstracts from all IPS members, full and associate. If you are not yet a member of the International Plato Society, criteria for membership and information about joining are available at: https://platosociety.org/membership/.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 07/20/2018 - 10:56am by Erik Shell.

In my most recent letter, I outlined the reasons why there are so few cities that can accommodate the SCS-AIA Joint Annual Meeting. That constraint has mainly to do with facilities, and it will likely remain even if we decide to meet at another time of year. In fact, it could get worse, because at another time we might face more competition from the corporate sector, and thus higher costs. But there are good reasons to consider meeting at another time of year, anyway.

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Fri, 07/20/2018 - 9:13am by Erik Shell.

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