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Workshop: Perseids' "Teach the Teachers" at Tufts University

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

Statements should demonstrate that an applicant has a strong desire to work with new and experimental teaching techniques. No experience with digital methods is required, but those with experience will be supported at their own level. Although we work primarily with Greek or Latin teachers, we encourage educators who work with other ancient languages to apply. An ideal candidate needs to be willing to approach teaching these subjects in new ways and should be prepared to implement them in the classroom. 

Send submissions in the form of a pdf to teachtheteachers2016@gmail.com

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Panel: Lingua Francas of Knowledge

Convenor: Karen Bennett, Universidade Nova, Lisbon

English is today the unrivalled vehicle for the transmission of knowledge, the language in which most scholarship is published, conferences are held, reading is done and lessons taught. However, its rise to prominence is a relatively recent development in the broad sweep of human history. From the middle of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th, English, French and German enjoyed a roughly equal status as languages of scientific publication, with others, such as Russian and Japanese, occupying niches in particular geographic areas. In the Medieval and Early Modern period, Latin was of course the lingua franca (LF) of learning, once so indispensable that it had to be mastered before any formal education could take place; and before that the prime position was held by Greek, the koiné of the Hellenistic world. Meanwhile, in the East, Arabic, Sanskrit and Chinese were also playing formidable roles in channelling learning through the centuries.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/01/2017 - 8:54am by Erik Shell.

SENSORIUM:

Sensory Perceptions in Roman Polytheism

Madrid, 16-18 November de 2017

The Institute of Historiography “Julio Caro Baroja”, at the University of Carlos III of Madrid is organizing an international conference titled, “SENSORIUM: Sensory Perceptions in Roman Polytheism.” Researchers of ancient history, religious history, archeology, anthropology, classical literature, and other related disciplines, are invited to present their research relating to the poly-sensorial practice of religion in the Roman world.

Since M. Maussand Merleau-Ponty’s publications about the role of the body in social interactions during the first half of the twentieth century (Mauss 1934; Merleau-Ponty 1945), studies about embodiment have benefited from a considerable amount of success since the 1990s in anthropology (Çsordas 1994, 2008), philosophy (Haraway 1991), semiotics (Landowski 2005, Fusaroli, Demuru et al. 2009) and cognitive linguistics (Geeraerts&Cuyckens 2007). The paradigm of embodiment considers that the body is no longer a mere object that reproduces culture, but an ontological condition for the existence of culture itself.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/28/2017 - 1:56pm by Erik Shell.

The journal Phasis – Greek and Roman Studies is published by the Institute of Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia. Phasis is a peer-reviewed academic journal and publishes original contributions in all areas of Greek and Roman Studies.

The journal invites papers for the forthcoming issue. Papers may be submitted in English, French or German. They should be no less than 5 000 words in length (not incl. footnotes and bibliography) and should be preceded by an abstract of 100-250 words in English. Please use a Unicode font for Greek. Each submission will be reviewed by two anonymous external reviewers.

If you are interested in publishing in Phasis, please send your article and abstract to phasis@tsu.ge by March 15, 2017, and include your name, address and affiliation in the accompanying email.

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.
 

Tamara Cheishvili

Managing Editor

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/28/2017 - 12:29pm by Erik Shell.

Erleichterte Griechische Grammatica Oder Gründliche Anführung Zur Griechischen S frontispiece.jpg

Co-authored with Vanessa Gorman, Professor of History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. vgorman1@unl.edu 

How many times have you stood in a classroom, trying to figure out a way to diagram coherently a Latin or Greek sentence on the board in order to clarify a structure that is baffling your students? Why not do the same thing digitally, and even require the students to construct their own sentence trees to demonstrate their understanding of the problem? A few years ago, we learned about a program to do just that. Arethusa is a set of tools developed by the Alpheios Project, adopted by the Perseus Digital Library, and delivered by the Perseids editing platform. We began using these syntactic trees in my advanced Latin classroom and were so pleased with the results that we soon introduced them to classes at all levels, from the second week of Latin 1 to the research capstone for majors.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/27/2017 - 12:00am by Robert Gorman.

We are delighted to welcome Cherane Ali as our new Director of Meetings.  Cherane has a BA from Baruch College and extensive meeting planning experience in both the US and Europe.  

We also thank the Nominating Committee for their work throughout the Fall and Winter to identify a slate of candidates who will stand for election in summer 2017.  You can view the complete slate here.

As a reminder, members will also be asked to vote this summer on a revision to the Working Conditions section of the Society's Professional Ethics Statement.  You can view the revised draft of the section here.  Comments on the draft should be sent to the Executive Director by March 1.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 02/26/2017 - 8:25pm by Helen Cullyer.

Today we celebrate the SCS 50-year Club.  Members who joined in 1967 have now been added to our list of 50-year members:

https://classicalstudies.org/membership/scs-50-year-club

Thank you to all on this list for your teaching, scholarship, service, and support.  

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 02/23/2017 - 9:17pm by Helen Cullyer.

Medieval Imagery

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

This spring I was fortunate to hear an interesting panel discussion—stand-up-and-take-notice interesting—at the Medieval Academy of America’s annual meeting, hosted by Notre Dame University. The panelists’ observations seemed to me relevant to the SCS both as demonstrating additional kinds of outreach but more importantly as discussing the peculiar period higher education now finds itself in, and what might be done about that at every level, from junior scholar to dean. Officially the panelists spoke in the context of medieval studies, but they mentioned classical studies at different points, and the vast majority of their comments would be applicable to nearly any department in the humanities, especially those involved with “old stuff” or those commonly regarded by the public as recondite. In short, if your discipline has a saying about it on the model of “It’s all [your day job] to me,” you’ll want to listen to the presentations by these three scholars.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 02/22/2017 - 8:55am by Ellen Bauerle.

Arabia in the Classical Sources

King Abdulaziz Foundation for Research and Archives (Ad-Darah) invites scholars to participate in the symposium "Arabia in the Classical Sources" which will be held in 21st - 23rd November 2017 in Riyadh.

The symposium welcome papers on subjects related to the Arabs and Arabia in classical sources. Topics will include, but will not necessarily limited to, the concepts of Arabs and Arabia, the sources of classical authors on Arabia, social life and economy of Arabia in the ancient times, flora and fauna of Arabia in classical writings, and classical authors' influence on western thoughts on ancient and modern Arabia.

Invitation has been sent to scholars specialized in the history of ancient Arabia during the Greek and Roman period to contribute to the symposium. Serious participants are welcome to submit new ideas and approaches to the symposium according to the terms and conditions of the attached first circular.
All correspondence should be addressed to prof. Al-Abduljabbar, the supervisor of the symposium and the "Arabia in the Classical Sources" project, at e-mail: aajabbar@me.com or arabiacs@darah.org.sa by April 16, 2017.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 12:09pm by Erik Shell.

Virtue, Skill and Practical Reason
Call for Abstracts

Keynote Speakers:
Prof. Julia Annas (University of Arizona)
Prof. Michael Thompson (University of Pittsburgh)
Prof. Rachel Barney (University of Toronto)

Aristotle drew an analogy between the acquisition of virtue and the acquisition of various skills such as archery and playing the lute. Since that time there has been substantial debate on how seriously one should take that analogy. In Intelligent Virtue (2011) Julia Annas has made a powerful case for taking it very seriously, whereas others are more cautious.

This conference aims to bring together philosophers working in the virtue tradition, in particular those working in ancient and moral philosophy, to discuss the complex relationships between skill and virtue. There appears to be a consensus that the acquisition of virtue is part of the broader acquisition of practical reasonableness, but there the consensus ends.

High quality abstracts are invited in any area of virtue theory, including but not limited to virtue ethics and virtue epistemology. Papers can have a historical focus, or they can be organised thematically. Papers from a non-Western perspective are welcome.

The conference will be held from Friday 25th to Sunday 27th August 2017 at the spectacular University of Cape Town, and there will be ample opportunities for sight-seeing.

Invited speakers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 10:07am by Erik Shell.

The Art of Praise: Panegyric and Encomium in Late Antiquity

DEADLINE EXTENDED: MARCH 3

Organizer: Paul Kimball, Bilkent University
Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 10:04am by Erik Shell.

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Please be aware that the deadline for individual abstracts for the 2018 annua
Calls for Papers
THE IMPACT OF LEARNING GREEK, HEBREW, AND ‘ORIENTAL’ LANGUAGES ON SCH
Awards and Fellowships
We are delighted to announce the following winners of the 2017 Pedagogy Award
Awards and Fellowships
Donald Mastronarde, SCS Member and Vice President for Publications and Resear

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