Workshop: Perseids' "Teach the Teachers" at Tufts University

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

Statements should demonstrate that an applicant has a strong desire to work with new and experimental teaching techniques. No experience with digital methods is required, but those with experience will be supported at their own level. Although we work primarily with Greek or Latin teachers, we encourage educators who work with other ancient languages to apply. An ideal candidate needs to be willing to approach teaching these subjects in new ways and should be prepared to implement them in the classroom. 

Send submissions in the form of a pdf to teachtheteachers2016@gmail.com

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Medusa

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/10/2017 - 10:11pm by Tom Kohn.

The SCS, with help from Ph.D.-granting institutions, has compiled a list of the current In-Progress dissertations as of this academic year (2016-2017). The page will be updated as information of new or completed dissertations comes in to the office.

You can view the new page here.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/10/2017 - 11:04am by Erik Shell.

Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions Conference II
Medical understandings of emotions in antiquity

University of Patras, December 8-10 2017

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/10/2017 - 9:51am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

April, 2017

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Matthew Simonton (Arizona State University, West Campus) - "Demagogues and Popular Culture in Ancient Greece
  • Valencia Community College (Directed by Sean Lake) - "Tragedy, Catharsis, and Reconciliation: Vocies from Ancient and Modern Warfare"
  • Kristina Killgrove (University of West Florida) - "Death comes to Oplontis: Recording and Analyzing Skeletons of Victims of Mt. Vesuvius (79 AD)
  • Touchstones Discussion Project, Inc. (Directed by Howard Zeiderman) - "Completing the Odyssey: A Journey Home"
  • Lofton Durham (Western Michigan University) - "Jacques Milet's Destruction of Troy and the Making of the French Nation"
  • Thomas Keeline (Washington University) - "Latin Textual Scholarship in the Digital Age: An Open-Access Critical Edition of Ovid's Ibis"
  • Aquila Theatre Company Inc. (Two Projects, both directed by Peter Meineck) - "The Warrior Chorus: Our Trojan War" and "Our Trojan War: Ancient and Modern Expressions"
  • Megan Nutzman (Old Dominion University) - "Ritual Cures Among Cristians, Jews, and Pagans in Roman and Late Antique Palestine

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 04/06/2017 - 8:09am by Erik Shell.

Fidelity of Fides: Authenticity in the Classical World
October 13th-14th, 2017
University of Toronto, Department of Classics
Graduate Student Conference

Keynote Speakers:
James Porter (University of California, Berkeley) 
Erik Gunderson (University of Toronto)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/06/2017 - 7:49am by Erik Shell.

The deadline for the SCS Koenen Fellowship for Training in Papyrology has been extended to April 15, 2017.

You can go here to read more about the program and see if you're eligible.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 04/05/2017 - 2:41pm by Erik Shell.
Boethius

"Teaching Classics in Prisons: Humanism, Identity, and the Building of Civic Bridges."

Rutgers Classicist, Emily Allen-Hornblower, will be sharing her experience bringing ancient Greek and Latin texts into America's prisons, testimony to the vitality of the classics in the most unexpected places. The presentation will take place on Thursday, April 6, @ 5:30pm on Fordham's Rose Hill campus (Duane Library 351). All are welcome to attend. Contact Professor Matthew McGowan, Chair of Classics: mamcgowan@fordham.edu

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(Photo: "Boethius Imprisoned" by Bkwillwm, public domain.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 04/04/2017 - 8:38am by Erik Shell.

The North American Workshop in Platonic Philosophy announces a call for abstracts for a 3-day workshop on Plato and Platonism, including ancient, medieval (Latin, Byzantine, Arabic, and Judaic), and modern philosophers working in the Platonic tradition, at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota, August 8-10, 2017.

Invited Speakers:
Lloyd Gerson (University of Toronto)
Sarah Klitenic-Wear (Franciscan University)

Please send abstracts of 250-450 words to co-organizers Danielle Layne (layne@gonzaga.edu) and Gary Gabor (ggabor01@hamline.edu) by May 31; notification by June 8. Accepted participants will be expected to attend all sessions; papers will be made available to participants August 5.

Subsidized low-cost on campus lodging available; financial assistance available. If interested, please contact workshop organizers as early as possible. Workshop fee of $45.

Questions, please contact Gary Gabor (ggabor01@hamline.edu).

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/03/2017 - 11:34am by Erik Shell.

A corpus and usage-based approach to Ancient Greek:
from the Archaic period until the Koiné

(Riga, University of Latvia, April 12-14, 2018)

Invited speakers (alphabetically):
Klaas Bentein (Ghent University)
Guiseppe Celano (Leipzig University)
James Clackson (University of Cambridge)
José Luis García Ramón (Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington, Harvard University)
Chiara Gianollo (University of Bologna)
Dag Haug (University of Oslo)
Geoffrey Horrocks (University of Cambrigde)
Daniel Kölligan (University of Cologne)
Martti Leiwo, Sonja Dahlgren & Marja Vierros (University of Helsinki)
Amalia Moser (University of Athens)
Paul Widmer & Florian Sommer (University of Zürich)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/03/2017 - 11:31am by Erik Shell.
CM Punk vs. Rey Mysterio. WWE House Show, 6/26/11

Milman Parry’s theory that the Homeric poems are the result of oral-formulaic composition, is central to the study of ancient epic. It can also be difficult to explain to students or non-Classicist friends, since the Iliad and Odyssey are now consumed primarily as books, not oral poems. Most oral traditions are at the tail end of their existence and most members of contemporary, literate societies have little experience with them. There is little to be done about the first of these issues, but we can address the second. While we may not have access to a significant body of oral composition, there are art forms created in the moment of performance that can be quite helpful in explaining how the Homeric epics were created and consumed by audiences. The most notable of these is professional wrestling.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/03/2017 - 12:00am by William Duffy.

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