Workshop: Perseids' "Teach the Teachers" at Tufts University

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

Statements should demonstrate that an applicant has a strong desire to work with new and experimental teaching techniques. No experience with digital methods is required, but those with experience will be supported at their own level. Although we work primarily with Greek or Latin teachers, we encourage educators who work with other ancient languages to apply. An ideal candidate needs to be willing to approach teaching these subjects in new ways and should be prepared to implement them in the classroom. 

Send submissions in the form of a pdf to teachtheteachers2016@gmail.com

---

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.
On Friday March 31, SCS received the following letter from Prof. Franco Montanari, President of FIEC.
 
We thank Prof. Montanari and FIEC for this statement of support for Classics and the humanities in general in the US.
 
Sir / Madam,
 
Recent developments in the funding of teaching and research in the Humanities in the United
States have become a cause of concern for the entire community of Classical Studies wordwide.
 
FIEC is an umbrella federation of all major associations of Classics in the world, including the
Society of Classical Studies, based in the US. We wish to express our stongest support to all our
colleagues who teach and conduct research at a time when the Humanities face a massive lack of
support from their government, which may result in major funding cuts.
 
Classical Studies are one of many tools used by scholars in the search of truth, respect and
solidarity between all peoples. At a time when biased opinions are presented as facts on a routine
basis, the study Greek and Latin, of the history of ancient peoples, of their archaeology, is of the
utmost importance to all those who believe in a fair and careful examination of facts, be it in the
View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Sun, 04/02/2017 - 7:41pm by Helen Cullyer.

Congratulations to Sarah Ahbel-Rappe (University of Michigan), Mary Bachvarova (Willamette University), and Megan Nutzman (Old Dominion University) for their 2017 ACLS Fellowships!

You can read the full list of 2017 recipients on the ACLS website.

Note: We've added Megan Nutzman as of April 3, 2017. We failed to mention her in the first version of the story as she was listed as being in a History department, not Classics.

---

(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 03/30/2017 - 10:36am by Erik Shell.

The draft budget proposed by President Trump's White House seems unlikely to be adopted.  Many believe it is simply an habitual negotiator's opening salvo, intended more to "start the bidding" than to be taken seriously at face value.

However, it is serious, because of the strong statement of values that it represents.  Along with the decimation or elimination of many critical programs that foster the health of our polity and our planet, Trump's budget, by proposing to eliminate the NEH and the NEA, asserts that the United States has no national interest in the support of the humanities or the arts.  

As educators, we join with many fellow scholars, represented by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), to protest and reject this vision of our nation, as a society with no investment in research, scholarship, history, philosophy, religion, language, literature, or creative arts.  The SCS will continue to join with advocacy organizations, including the National Humanities Alliance and the ACLS, to register our views as an organization.

But we urge members to also engage in "grassroots" participation, mindful of the dictum that "all politics is local."  In the current political milieu, the most effective action is for constituents to communicate their views to their local representatives in Congress.  Here are some ways to contact your representatives:

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Wed, 03/29/2017 - 2:03pm by Helen Cullyer.

Dear SCS Members,

As you know, we are now accepting submissions for the 2018 Annual Meeting in Boston.  The deadline for submitting all proposals and reports except individual abstracts is 11:59 pm, Eastern Time, on April 7, 2017.
The deadline for individual abstracts is 11:59 pm, Eastern Time, on April 26, 2017.

You can access the program submission system at the following link:

http://program.classicalstudies.org/

We also have one fellowship deadline approaching.  Applications for the Ludwig Koenen Fellowship for Training in Papyrology should be received in the SCS office by April 4.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 03/27/2017 - 8:40am by Erik Shell.
The Prophecy of Calchas from a set of The Story of Troy

There are many definitions for the Digital Humanities—some wonder whether it is, in fact, a distinct field at all. My mind tends to operate at a pragmatic level and I have a very simple way of thinking about the question: in the Digital Humanities we think about what contributions we as humanists can make to a world where an increasing, if not a predominant, amount of human thought circulates through digital media: texts, sounds and images on our smartphones, video-conferencing and texting instead of simple voice communication, digital libraries of texts that support new forms of reading, new forms of representing human ideas and experience—everything is changing and nothing will be the same. And yet the big questions remain the same. The big question is not what we think about the Digital Humanities but what we think about the Humanities in a digital age. Why do we study the Humanities at all? I actually think it would be more appropriate to speak of the “Print Humanities” to distinguish the practices of print culture from the Humanities as they are evolving today.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/27/2017 - 12:00am by Gregory R Crane.

Between nostos and exilium: "home" in on-screen representations of the ancient Mediterranean world and its narratives

An area of multiple panels for the 2017 Film & History Conference:

"Representing Home: The Real and Imagined Spaces of Belonging"

The Hilton, Milwaukee City Center, Milwaukee, WI (USA)
November 1-5, 2017
DEADLINE for abstracts: June 1, 2017 (early deadline); July 1, 2017 (general deadline)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 03/24/2017 - 3:28pm by Erik Shell.

Opportunities to volunteer for SCS Committees and elected offices are now available to members.  Committee appointments will begin in 2018 and elected offices in 2019:

Read about what each committee does

Go straight to the volunteer page to download the form

We rely on the work of volunteers to direct the Society's policies and collaborate with SCS staff in implementing programs that are important for our members and the field as a whole. Member participation is, and always will be, an impactful part of that effort.  

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:43am by Erik Shell.

Andromache Karanika will officially become the Editor of TAPA in January 2018, but will handle incoming submissions effective immediately.

Please send all submissions electronically to tapa@uci.edu, following TAPA guidelines. Craig Gibson will remain the official Editor through 2017 and is in charge of producing this year's issues (147.1 and 2).

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 03/21/2017 - 8:04am by Erik Shell.
Kenchreai

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions. All links are active, however, some information such as pricing may have changed.

As the tools and methods for creating 3D models of sites and objects become less expensive, archaeologists are increasingly putting them to good use in the field. This article focuses on my collaborative work to scan objects found at the site of Kenchreai in Greece and now stored nearby in the Isthmia Museum. It does cover practical issues and one goal of writing this piece is to encourage others to explore the creation of 3D content. Accordingly, I stress that 3D tools are becoming easier to use, not just less expensive. And it will be as important to think about what to do with these models after they are made. Permanent access to 3D models is a goal and initial steps towards that are described below. Likewise, rich linking of information about scanned objects to descriptions of their original archaeological findspot will further encourage contextualized studies of Greek and Roman material culture.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/20/2017 - 1:00am by Sebastian Heath.

This message is intended for members in the US.  Yesterday, President Trump’s budget blueprint was published.  It calls for the elimination of many crucial educational and cultural agencies including the NEH, NEA, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and Institute of Museum of Library Services (IMLS). 

A brief survey of grants made by the NEH over the last seven years shows the potential impact on our field.  The NEH has funded:

-          Numerous research fellowships for individual scholars as well as the SCS-administered TLL Fellowship and the fellowship program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

-          Digitization, publication, and editing of ancient coins, inscriptions, and papyri.

-          Projects that explore the use of computational methods for analyzing ancient texts.

-          Archaeological projects from Italy to Jordan.

-          Initiatives run by the Aquila Theatre Company, Inc., state humanities councils, and scholars that are engaging veterans and members of the public in discussion and performance of ancient works that speak to modern experiences of war.

-          Seminars on ancient literature, philosophy, and material culture for faculty in the higher education and K-12 sectors.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Fri, 03/17/2017 - 8:44am by Helen Cullyer.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
The inaugural conference of the Canadian Aristotle Society conference will be
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
Presidential Letters

© 2017, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy