Workshop: Perseids' "Teach the Teachers" at Tufts University

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

Statements should demonstrate that an applicant has a strong desire to work with new and experimental teaching techniques. No experience with digital methods is required, but those with experience will be supported at their own level. Although we work primarily with Greek or Latin teachers, we encourage educators who work with other ancient languages to apply. An ideal candidate needs to be willing to approach teaching these subjects in new ways and should be prepared to implement them in the classroom. 

Send submissions in the form of a pdf to teachtheteachers2016@gmail.com

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The English academic term Classics has conventionally designated the study of Ancient Greek and Classical Latin. The department from which I received both of my academic degrees makes the point explicit: its official name is “the Department of the Classics.” The department focuses upon Greek and Latin and the addition of the definite article asserts that these are the only Classical languages.

I do not believe that a single current member of that department would express any disrespect for Classical Chinese, Classical Arabic, Classical Persian, or Classical Sanskrit—the department’s name is an artifact from a previous era (and I find it also troubling that no one from outside Greco-Roman studies has cared enough to object to this continued terminology).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/07/2017 - 12:00am by Gregory R Crane.
NEH Logo

August, 2017

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects, with support totaling nearly $1.1 million. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 08/04/2017 - 12:36pm by Erik Shell.

In Memoriam: Alan Cameron

(Submitted by Deborah Steiner, Department of Classics, Columbia University)

Alan Cameron, the Charles Anthon Professor Emeritus of Latin and Literature at Columbia University, died on July 31st at the age of 79 in New York while receiving treatment for complications arising from ALS. Alan was educated at St. Paul’s School in London, and at New College, Oxford, where he was awarded a first class degree in Literae Humaniores in 1961. Without ever needing to complete a Phd, a point of considerable amusement and pride, Alan took up teaching positions in Glasgow and London before joining the Columbia faculty in 1977; he remained in the department until his retirement in 2008.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 08/03/2017 - 11:52am by Erik Shell.
Sparrow sitting on a fountain

Catullus Online is a freely available digital edition of the poems of Catullus. It can be accessed simply as a Latin text of the poems—in editor Dániel Kiss’s own edition—or with each line linked to a full apparatus. Many poems can also be viewed in photographs from important manuscripts (such as O, courtesy of the Bodleian Library). This is a useful project for its intrinsic value as a new text of Catullus, for its ease of availability, and for the directions it implies for new tools in the study of very old texts. Here I will review it briefly as a text of Catullus, as a website, and finally as groundwork for the kind of online Catullus edition we can hope for in the future.

Unlike other editions of Catullus in digital form (e.g., at The Latin Library), this edition is the product of Kiss’s own research. In contrast to printed editions, Kiss has been able to include as full an apparatus as he likes. As a result, this apparatus is now the easiest way to trace the history of specific readings and scholarly conjectures on them.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/31/2017 - 12:00am by Christopher Nappa.
Late Classical Greek Inscription

The Packard Humanities Institute’s Searchable Greek Inscriptions revolutionized the accessibility of ancient Greek epigraphic texts, first in CD-ROM format and then online since 2005. David Packard, Jr. initiated the project in the late 1980s as a collaboration between teams of scholars at Cornell University and The Ohio State University, and supported it financially through the Packard Humanities Institute (PHI). The original intent was to produce searchable texts of the well-over 200,000 inscriptions published in volumes like Inscriptiones Graecae (IG). The PHI editors did not aim to replace or fully re-edit the published editions of the texts, but did make corrections and standardize many inconsistencies. (On the early years of the project and its working methods, see Iversen 2007).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/24/2017 - 12:00am by Laura Gawlinski.

Congratulations to SCS member Ineke Sluiter on being named British Academy Corresponding Fellow for 2017 alongside 65 other Fellows.

To read the full news story and read about the work of all 2017 Fellows, you can visit the British Academy's website.

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(Photo: "The British Academy's royal seal depicts the Greek Muse Clio" by the British Academy's Web Master, brightened by user Ivtorov and licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 07/21/2017 - 8:52am by Erik Shell.

SIBC has corrected an error in the recent Announcement "L'Année philologique Moving to Brepols."

First Version

"Libraries and individuals currently subscribing through Les Belles Lettres and EBSCO will continue to have online access through these distributors until their current subscription concludes, no later than Dec. 31, 2018"

Corrected Version

"Libraries and individuals currently subscribing through Les Belles Lettres and EBSCO will continue to have online access through these distributors until their current subscription concludes, no later than Sept. 30, 2018."

Affected libraries should note this change, as the deadline is significantly closer than before.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/20/2017 - 9:50am by Erik Shell.
Map of Ancient Rome Illustrating Major Monuments and the Seven Hills

Digital Augustan Rome is a web-based platform that provides a visual synopsis, with textual commentary, of contemporary scholarship on the topography of Rome, c. 14 CE. On the project’s homepage, the director David Romano emphasizes that DAR is in only the second of four planned stages (as of April, 2017). Even at this stage, however, DAR already constitutes a significant contribution to scholarship on the topography of Augustan Rome. I would highly recommend a visit to the site.

DAR is a digital successor to the 2002 print volume Mapping Augustan Rome.[1] In its current form, it relies almost entirely on material that has already been published and reviewed.[2] In this review, therefore, I focus primarily on those aspects of the project that are unique to DAR—namely, its presentation of the material in a specifically digital format. I begin with a brief introduction. I then proceed to highlight what I see as DAR’s two most significant strengths, as well as several areas for improvement.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:00am by Scott Lawin Arcenas.

CALL FOR PAPERS:
CONFERENCE 24-26 MAY 2018,
BANFF, ALBERTA (CANADA)

Greek and Roman Pasts in the Long Second Century: The Intellectual Climate of Cassius Dio

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 07/10/2017 - 2:31pm by Erik Shell.
Munich Nymphenburg

(From the Washington Post)

Former SCS TLL Fellow Charles McNamara has written an article for the Washington Post on funding for TLL in the current U.S. political climate.

"On the shelf, [the TLL] resembles the Oxford English Dictionary, but administratively, the project looks a bit like CERN, the laboratory for the study of particle physics. Just as the 22 member states of CERN collaborate on long-term research too costly for one country to undertake alone, the TLL is home to scholars funded by countries from around the world, among them Japan, Denmark, Italy and the United States."

You can read the full article on the Washington Post website here.

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(Photo: "Munich Nymphenburg" by Matthias Ott, licensed under CC BY 2.0.)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/10/2017 - 12:25pm by Erik Shell.

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