Workshop: Perseids' "Teach the Teachers" at Tufts University

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

Statements should demonstrate that an applicant has a strong desire to work with new and experimental teaching techniques. No experience with digital methods is required, but those with experience will be supported at their own level. Although we work primarily with Greek or Latin teachers, we encourage educators who work with other ancient languages to apply. An ideal candidate needs to be willing to approach teaching these subjects in new ways and should be prepared to implement them in the classroom. 

Send submissions in the form of a pdf to teachtheteachers2016@gmail.com

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The deadline for submitting:

  • All proposals for panels, workshops, seminars, and roundtable discussions.
  • Reports from organizers of committee, organizer-refereed, and affiliated group panels who have issued their own CFPs.
  • Proposals for organizer-refereed panels for 2020.
  • Applications for new affiliated group charters and for renewals of current charters.

is next Monday, April 9th. Individual abstracts are due April 25th.

Anyone hoping to submit an abstract or another proposal can do so on our program submission website.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 04/04/2018 - 8:09am by Erik Shell.

(Provided by Roberta Berardi, Nicoletta Bruno, Martina Filosa, Luisa Fizzarotti)

We are delighted to share the Call for Papers for Prolepsis’ 3rd international Postgraduate Conference 
“Optanda erat oblivio”: Selection and Loss in Ancient and Medieval Literature
University of Bari, 20th-21st December 2018

Confirmed keynote speaker: Tiziano DORANDI (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Paris)

Prolepsis Association is delighted to announce its third international postgraduate conference whose theme will be the mechanisms of selection and loss in ancient and Medieval literary and historical texts. “Optanda erat oblivio” Seneca writes in benef. 5. 25. 2, referring to Tiberius’ wish for forgetfulness. We would like to use this quotation as a starting point for a discussion on the vast number of issues related to memory and oblivion in ancient and Medieval texts. This year the conference will be particularly keen on - but not limited to - the following topics:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 04/03/2018 - 12:45pm by Erik Shell.

(Provided by David A. Reingold)

On Sun., March 25th, 2018, the College of Liberal Arts lost our dear colleague Professor Antonia Syson. Her friends and colleagues in the School of Languages and Cultures will remember Antonia for her passionate and intense dedication to all aspects of her work and for her exceptionally large laugh and cheerful whistling that brightened the hallways of Stanley Coulter.

Antonia received her BA with Honors from the University of Oxford in 1995, her MA in Latin from UC-Berkeley in 1997, and her PhD in Classics from UC-Berkeley in 2003. She joined the Classics faculty at Purdue in the School of Languages and Cultures in 2008. She authored the book Fama and Fiction in Vergil’s Aeneid, published in 2013 by Ohio State University Press. It was released in paperback last year. She was promoted with tenure in 2014. Antonia was a longtime chair of SLC’s community engagement project World Film Forum, and in 2014, Antonia was the lead coordinator on a grant from the Indiana Humanities Initiative that brought together K-12 and post-secondary teachers from across the state for the conference “Teaching the Past: Dissenting Histories in the Classroom.”

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 04/02/2018 - 2:57pm by Erik Shell.
Adrienne Mayor with Nikos Solounias, still image from "Ancient Monster Hunters" (A&E Home Video, 2004)
In March, SCS editor-in-chief Sarah Bond interviewed ancient historian Adrienne Mayor, author of some of the bestselling books in the field of Classics, among them: The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World and The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy. We discussed Classics, pop-culture, writing for broader audiences, what it is like to consult with film and TV studios to help them recreate the ancient world accurately, and why the Amazons remain an inspiration even today.
 

Q. How did you first get interested in Classics and the ancient world?

My Book House (edited by Olive Beaupré Miller, 1920, with vivid illustrations) first introduced me to classical myths and world folklore. As a child I read those stories countless times. I reconnected with the ancient world at the University of Minnesota, where I combined classical studies, folklore, and history of science. Back then, I was mostly seeking stories to illustrate in my artwork.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 03/31/2018 - 10:24am by Adrienne Mayor.

Dear Members,

The deadline for submitting all proposals and reports except individual abstracts is 11:59 pm, Eastern Time, on April 9, 2018. This deadline applies to panels, workshops, roundtables, seminars, organizer-refereed panels, affiliated group panels, committee panels, and affiliated group charters.

The deadline for individual abstracts, including lightning talks, is 11:59 pm, Eastern Time, on April 25, 2018.

All submissions should be made through the SCS Program Submission system.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 03/30/2018 - 1:23pm by Erik Shell.

In the 6th century CE, a Scythian monk named Dionysius Exiguus was sent to Rome. Dionysius may have taken the monastic nickname of "the small" (exiguus), but his humility sheathed both his incredible abilities as a translator of Greek and Latin and his mathematical skills. He wrote and translated numerous saints lives, transcribed debates on heresies, and was known for his work with canon law. However, what Dionysius would be remembered for was his modifications to the dating system used within the Church and his attempts to use tables, called a computus, in order to track the date of Easter.  

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/30/2018 - 4:59am by Sarah Bond.

ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN REVOLUTIONS

A Conference to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of AHMA at UC Berkeley

September 6 to September 8, 2018

The Graduate Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology (AHMA) was a revolutionary initiative. It brought together a number of previously segregated fields, disciplines, and methods in an attempt to produce a broader, deeper, and more richly textured vision of Mediterranean antiquity. The program was designed to bridge two persistent gaps in particular: between the disciplines of History (text) and Archaeology (material culture), on the one hand, and between the civilizations of Greece and Rome and those of the Near East and Egypt, on the other. As the first interdisciplinary program of its kind in the world—long before “interdisciplinarity” had become an academic buzzword—AHMA helped to set an ambitious agenda that has transformed the study of the ancient Mediterranean world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 03/29/2018 - 1:58pm by Erik Shell.
Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World XIII

Call for Papers

The Department of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin invites all classicists, historians, religious studies and biblical scholars, and scholars with an interest in oral cultures to participate in the Thirteenth Conference on Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World, to take place in Austin (TX) from Wednesday 27 March 2019 to Sunday 31 March 2019.

The conference will follow the same format as the previous conferences, held in Hobart (1994), Durban (1996), Wellington (1998), Columbia, Missouri (2000), Melbourne (2002), Winnipeg (2004), Auckland (2006), Nijmegen (2008), Canberra (2010), Ann Arbor (2012), Atlanta (2014), and Lausanne (2016). It is planned that the refereed proceedings once again be published by E.J. Brill as Volume 13 in the “Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World” series.

Location:       The University of Texas at Austin

Dates:             Wednesday 27 March (registration that evening) to Sunday 31 March 2019

Theme:          Repetition

Keynote:        Professor Ruth Scodel (Classics, University of Michigan)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 03/29/2018 - 1:54pm by Erik Shell.

(Provided by Ann Vasaly [FAAR 1983, RAAR 2010])

Eleanor Winsor Leach (1937-2018)

On February 19th it was learned that Eleanor Winsor Leach, Ruth N. Halls Professor of Classics at Indiana University, had passed away at the age of 80.  At the suggestion of Brian Rose, I wanted to take the opportunity to write to the Advisory Council of the important role she played in her chosen profession and her devotion throughout her career to the American Academy.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 03/29/2018 - 12:45pm by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

After the threat of agency closure by the end of next fiscal year, congress has instead approved a $3 million dollar increase in funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

"The spending bill notes that the increases will help the NEH enhances its support for the preservation of Native languages and cultures and local history preservation initiatives, as well as fund a new program to build infrastructure and capacity for humanities organizations."

You can read the full analysis on the NEH website here.

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 03/27/2018 - 3:00pm by Erik Shell.

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