Workshop: Perseids' "Teach the Teachers" at Tufts University

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

Participants should submit a statement of up to 500-700 words in length. Funding will be provided on an as-needed basis. Submissions will be accepted until May 1st

Statements should demonstrate that an applicant has a strong desire to work with new and experimental teaching techniques. No experience with digital methods is required, but those with experience will be supported at their own level. Although we work primarily with Greek or Latin teachers, we encourage educators who work with other ancient languages to apply. An ideal candidate needs to be willing to approach teaching these subjects in new ways and should be prepared to implement them in the classroom. 

Send submissions in the form of a pdf to teachtheteachers2016@gmail.com

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

CALL FOR ACTORS, DESIGNERS AND OTHER CREATIVE TYPES!

for

The Arsonists (a morality play without a moral)

by Max Frisch

Translated by Alistair Beaton

Fri, Jan 5th, 2018

SCS Annual Meeting, Boston

Directed by Laura & Mike Lippman

This year we will continue the tradition of CAMP sponsored productions with a staged reading of The Arsonists (a morality play without a moral) by Max Frisch, translated by Alistair Beaton.

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Tue, 05/16/2017 - 2:06pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers:

Wilderness, Frontiers, and New Worlds in Antiquity

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

New York University

November 4, 2017

Keynote: Prof. Andrew Laird (Brown University)

Unfamiliar, unexplored, and unsettled places captivated the ancient imagination and were of pressing importance not only to poets and prose writers of every genre, but also to merchants, militaries, and governing bodies enticed by the prospects of new sites for trading, settling, and conquering. There has been a swell of critical interest recently in the topics of borders and boundaries in the ancient world, as part of the increased scholarly attention to space over the past few decades. Our conference is interested in spaces beyond borders, and we aim to explore ancient encounters with wilderness, frontiers, and unknown lands.

Possible topics include:

•   Visual representations of wilderness and extreme environments

•   Representations in ancient texts of the landscape, weather, and human adaptation in unexplored lands

•   Narrations and theorizations of journeys undersea, into the sky, or below the earth

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 05/15/2017 - 9:33am by Erik Shell.

Podcast listening is more popular than ever. Data from the large Infinite Dial survey shows steady yearly growth in the share of adults over 12 who have listened to at least one podcast. In 2016, 36% reported having done so, for an estimated 96 million people nationwide. The time is therefore right for classicists to embrace this medium for public engagement.

While podcasting takes time and preparation and may have a steep learning curve, it is very rewarding. Research interests come alive in a new way when you create and share your ideas via podcasting. Listener responses will help you develop your ideas in new directions. Podcasting also breaks down academia’s walls, creating a wider audience and inviting the public to see what scholars do and why it matters.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/15/2017 - 12:00am by Alison Innes.

Call for Papers
Deadline for Submissions is April 1st 2018

KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies

A New Annual Journal Published by the Societatis De Tauro Cum Facie Humana

General Editor:
Nicholas J. Molinari, US
njmolinari@gmail.com

Editorial Board

Shawn Caza, CA
Alberto Campana, IT
Victor Clark, US
Curtis Clay, US
Phil Davis, US
Tjaart de Beer, CH
Mark Fox, US
József Géza Kiss, HU
David MacDonald, US
Gavin Richardson, US
Martin Rowe, SE
David Sear, US
Andrew Short, CA
Nicola Sisci, IT
Lloyd W. H. Taylor, AU
Joseph Uphoff, US
John Zielinski, US

Papers concerning virtually any topic of ancient coinage are welcome, including papers on non-western coinages.  Reviews and short notes are also encouraged, as are translations of important excerpts from antiquarian works. Special preference will be given to papers that are engaging to a fairly wide audience (Art Historians, Classicists, Archaeologists, Historians, etc.). 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 05/11/2017 - 11:38am by Erik Shell.
Detail of Dying Eurydice, Charles-François Lebœuf (1826), Galerie Colbert, Paris, France

This article was originally published in Amphora (12.1). It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

The story is familiar. Musician marries the love of his life; on their wedding day, she dies. He grieves until he wills his way into the Underworld and is allowed to retrieve her on one condition, which he violates. Thus, even the theme is the same: the fallibility of the human condition and the inability of art to triumph over the persistence of suffering and the finality of death. Nor is Eurydice a strident feminist with a point to prove, after centuries of silent existence as nothing more than a catalyst for the erotic narrative that is the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. For contemporary American playwright Sarah Ruhl, Eurydice is foremost a daughter who learns the hard way that all relationships are constructed of words that cannot always withstand the insistent tensions and demands of parents and spouses. Since language is so deficient, Ruhl deploys light, space, distance, and depth to hone the banal into razor-sharp instruments capable of exposing emotional vulnerabilities most audience members would rather not admit existed. For Ruhl, in the theater space must yield to imagination, not, as in film, the other way around.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 9:42pm by Victoria Emma Pagán.

(This is a message from the SCS Annual Fund Committee, sent to members on May 8th, 2017)

We’re looking for a few good classicists.

Actually, we’re looking for quite a few good classicists, those who will constitute the next generation of our profession. It’s our job to foster scholars who are entering the field, including those in contingent faculty positions and graduate students giving papers at the Annual Meeting. Many of these scholars hope to be in Boston next January, ready to experience the full professional and social dimensions of our vocation. Their work and their presence at the Annual Meeting will enrich our own future.

They just need a little help, and the SCS Annual Fund can provide it.

The Annual Fund supports contingent faculty and graduate students through travel grants to the Annual Meeting. Thanks to the generosity of our members, over $25,000 in travel grants have been awarded over the past two years. But the demand is still greater than the supply; last year, the SCS was able to fund only half of the requests from graduate students. Your gifts also support undergraduate minority scholarships, TLL Fellowships, and the Lionel Pearson Fellowship, and in addition to keeping down the costs of the Annual Meeting for everyone, they ensure that the Placement Service is free for all member applicants.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 12:58pm by Erik Shell.

Between Philosophy and Rhetoric
May 13 – 14, 2017
NYU Philosophy/Classics

Anyone intending to attend the workshop should let Laura Viidebaum (lv40@nyu.edu) know by *Monday, May 8th* the latest, so that they have an idea of numbers and can plan accordingly.

organizers: Laura Viidebaum (NYU), Toomas Lott (NYU/Tartu)
location: NYU Classics department, 100 Washington Square East, Room 503

Saturday, May 13th
9.15-9.30 Coffee, introduction and welcome

9.30 - 11.10am
Usha Nathan (Columbia) ‘Why persuade with pathos?’
Response: Iakovos Vasiliou (CUNY)

11.10 - 11.20 Coffee break

11.20am - 1.00pm
Joel Mann (St Norbert) ‘Rediscovering “Hippocrates”: the rhetoric of skepticism in περὶ φύσιος ἀνθρώπου’
Response: Calloway Scott (NYU)

1.00 - 2.30pm Lunch

2.30 - 4.10pm
Richard Hunter (Cambridge) ‘Listening to the Sirens’
Response: Mirjam Kotwick (New School)

4.10 - 4.20 Coffee break

4.20 - 6pm
Edward Schiappa (MIT) ‘Isocrates, Pragmatism, and the Endless Mediation of Rhetoric & Philosophy’
Response: Colin King (Providence College)

7pm Dinner and drinks

Sunday, May 14th
9.15-9.30 Coffee

9.30 - 11.10am
Nancy Worman (Barnard) ‘Philosophizing embodiment in Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric’
Response: Nicholas Rynearson (NYU)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 12:08pm by Erik Shell.

Paideia, Power and Persuasion: Political Thinking in and around Plato

University of Bergen, 12-13 June

The symposium is free of charge. Advance registration is compulsory for those wishing to attend. Please register with Kirsten.Bang@uib.no before June 1st.

Schedule

DAY I (12 June)

0900-0915 Welcome

0915-1115 KEYNOTE: Ryan Balot (University of Toronto): “The 'Truest Tragedy' in Plato's Laws”

1130-1215 Kristin Sampson (University of Bergen): “The Ambiguity of Music in Plato”

1215-1330 Lunch

1330-1415 Vivil Haraldsen (University of Oslo): “Paideia and Freedom of Thought in Plato’s Republic”

1415-1500 Andreas Staurheim Enggrav (University of Bergen): “Justice for All?”

1515-1630 Olof Pettersson (Uppsala University): “Politics of the Voice: Writing & Speaking in Plato’s Phaedrus”

DAY II (13 June)

0915-1030 Charlotta Weigelt (Södertörn University): “The Power of Nature: Paideia and the Dissolution of the Nuclear Family in Plato's Republic”

1045-1200 Hayden Ausland (University of Montana): “Sagacity and Politics”

1200-1300 Lunch

1300-1415 Ellisif Wasmuth (University of Oxford): “What To Do When You Don't Know What To Do: Plato on Non-Ideal Politics”

1430-1515 Hallvard Fossheim (University of Bergen): “The Political Force of Friendship”

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 12:02pm by Erik Shell.

From the Asheville Citizen-Times:

It is with great regret that we report the passing of Edwin L. Brown, former professor at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. 

"His research and teaching at UNC-Chapel Hill reflected his broad interests and lively curiosity, ranging from Latin poetry (especially Vergil) to Greek didactic poetry, the early Greek gods, and Greek and Roman astronomy, especially constellation names. He was particularly interested in the connections between the early Greeks and the Near East, an area of research that led him to study the Greek god Poseidon, the enigmatic early script known as Linear A, and numerous other thorny fields of inquiry."

To read the full publication of this obituary and leave any memories or comments about Edwin, visit this legacy.com post.

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View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 10:28am by Erik Shell.
Delphi

The Dutch Research Council (NWO) has just awarded OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies in the Netherlands, a grant of €18.8 million to develop their research agenda (“Anchoring Innovation”) over a period of ten years (2018-2027). Ineke Sluiter (Leiden University) will be directing this program together with André Lardinois (Radboud University).

They note that they are particularly happy to be able to bring this news at a time when the value of the Humanities for society (and hence also their fundability) seems not to be shared by governments everywhere. "We will do whatever we can to show that fundamental research in the Humanities can go hand in hand with participating in current societal debates," says Ineke.

For more information about the current status of the research agenda and first results of this pilot program, started in 2014, you can visit their website: http://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/anchoring-innovation/

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(Photo: "Delphi" by Ronny Siegel, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 8:52am by Erik Shell.

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