CFP: Annual Meeting for Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW)

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.
AMPRAW 2021 will be held at Columbia University in the City of New York (USA) from Thursday, November 11 to Saturday, November 13, 2021, in collaboration with the Department of Classics at Columbia University, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Columbia University Libraries Journals.

Due to the unpredictability caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are not yet able to confirm that the conference will take place in person. We hope that this will be possible; however, we are also making plans to accommodate a hybrid or online-only event. We will keep you updated as the situation evolves. Please be aware that, if the conference will be in person, we are unable to guarantee travel reimbursements to speakers, but we might be able to offer support on a need basis.
 

Confirmed keynote speaker:
Dr. Patrice Rankine (University of Richmond, Virginia)

Ellen McLaughlin (Playwright and Actress)
 

This year's theme will be Center & Periphery in the Classics: Theory, Practice and Turning Points. The liminal features of the US (and of New York City in particular) inspired us to focus on this topic. Reception Studies in Classics are still treated as “peripheral” in many places, including this country, in spite of their increasing importance. In particular, they have been sidelined both by those who advocate the study of Classics as an unquestionable discipline, and those who wish to do away with the classical heritage completely. Framing the discussion in terms of center and periphery has the effect of illuminating the ways in which this dichotomy has historically inhabited – and haunted – academia. Conversations about how the Classics contributed to create the myth of a pure and privileged Western culture against which all attempts at intervention have been delegitimized are becoming more and more frequent within North American universities. Hosting AMPRAW at Columbia will facilitate a most important and timely dialogue around how we define what gets treated as a center and why, and who is left out. Moreover, the concepts of center and periphery need not be understood strictly as geographical or sociopolitical ideas; central to the discussion about the discipline of Classics and its future is the question of its methodologies. Peripheral receptions would also encompass works realized through innovative methodological approaches, both at the research and at the pedagogical level. The theme we propose will open up some areas within the discipline as it is traditionally conceived of: in particular, it could call into question the primacy attributed to the Classical canon, allowing for voices generally disregarded to regain a central place within the scholarly world. Not least, Columbia is stimulated and inspired by its own location – New York City being a historical crossroad of cultures, it makes such a renegotiation even more compelling than elsewhere. The city would provide a perfect setting for this meeting, insofar as it showcases the attractiveness of the center, while also revealing how the periphery exists within and is in tension with it.
 

We invite papers of 20-25 minutes dealing with any aspect of Classical Reception(s). Possible topics might be related, but are not limited to, the following areas:

• Classics Inside and Outside the Canon; Classics Inside and Outside Academia
• Decolonizing the Classics
• Classics & Activism
• New Pedagogical Strategies in Classics
• Translation Studies
• Classics and Gender, Sexuality and Queer Studies
• Classics as Public Humanities
 

We encourage proposals in the fields of, but not limited to, archaeology, literary studies, linguistics, (art) history, media studies, religious studies, cultural studies, history of law and political science, dealing with all time periods. The conference will be held in English, for the sake of convenience and accessibility. We acknowledge that this choice is in itself political and problematic, as it betrays a certain history of cultural hegemony and power. We will also encourage our speakers to think explicitly about their own relationship with this issue.
Moreover, we are working with the Columbia University Libraries to create a digital publication containing the proceedings of the conference. We hope that this will make participating in AMPRAW an even more productive and exciting opportunity for graduate students and early researchers in the field.
 

If you would like to present a paper at AMPRAW 2021, please send an abstract of around 200 words to ampraw2021@gmail.com by June 30th 2021, together with a short biography stating your name, affiliation, and contact address. Please indicate in your submission whether you would like to apply for a travel reimbursement. Applicants will be selected and notified by the first week of July.

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A black krater vase with red-figure depicts Zeus caressing Io while Hermes slays Argus

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 11 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

This post centers on two projects that employ Greek and Roman literature in innovative ways to deal with contemporary issues. The first project draws inspiration from Euripides’ Trojan Women to facilitate the expression and sharing of intense experiences between students in the University of California and female prisoners, while the second project adapts Ovid’s Metamorphoses in a one-woman show that explores the role of women in our post #MeToo era.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/16/2021 - 11:35am by .

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

A virtual symposium hosted by the Gallatin School of Individualize Study

Ancient queens established a powerful public presence through visual and material culture, and their legacies continue to shape and impact the ways we express ideas about race, gender, and identity.

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT is an interdisciplinary, virtual symposium hosted by NYU Gallatin on September 23-24, 2021. This symposium integrates scholarly and creative knowledge production from different perspectives that broaden the stakes and widen the impact of historical work. The symposium will model collaborative, critical, and public approaches to history and art by including the expertise of students, artists, performers, and educators beyond the university alongside the work of scholars and curators. Spanning two days, the symposium comprises seven panel discussions, five keynote talks, one performance, and an interactive website featuring public engagement, student work, and more.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:03pm by Erik Shell.

Multiple Explanations in the Ancient Greek and Roman World

Virtual seminar series, 2021-2022

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers: 

XR and the Humanities: Virtual Education in the 21st Century

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 9:16am by Erik Shell.

“What Has Antiquity Ever Done for Us?” The Vitality of Ancient Reception Studies, Now

An international virtual conference presented by Antiquity in Media Studies (AIMS)

15-18 December 2021

Deadline for submissions: 15 October 2021

The officers of Antiquity in Media Studies invite proposals for presentations that illuminate the ongoing vitality of antiquity in recent discourses. Despite decades of institutional disinvestment in the study of antiquity, a venerated deep past figured as a powerful shared imaginary remains a perennial, emotionally evocative, even highly lucrative concept in myriad contemporary media, around the world and across all manner of identity lines. Among antiquities, of particularly widespread interest has been the millennia of history centered on the Mediterranean and dubbed “classical” among successor societies, both self-appointed and colonized. From Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed Odyssey to Luis Alfaro’s Mojada, from Hideki Takeuchi’s Thermae Romae to Pat Barker’s Silence of the Girls, to politicians' and pundits' invocations of the Persian Wars and the fall of Rome, each year produces more receptions of this antiquity. Beyond the Greco-Roman-centered past, all antiquities mobilized for such cultural work today are welcome at this ancient reception studies conference. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/14/2021 - 11:30am by Erik Shell.

(Published on behalf of Werner Reiß)

Dear colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that Professor Werner Riess and his team announce the launch of the new database TheDefix (Thesaurus Defixionum), which replaces the earlier version TheDeMa (Thesaurus Defixionum Magdeburgensis). TheDefix is an open access Heurist database hosted by the University of Hamburg, Department of Ancient History, and can be reached at the following link:

www.thedefix.uni-hamburg.de.

As its predecessor TheDeMa, TheDefix seeks to collect all published curse inscriptions from the ancient world, providing the original texts, data on their material textual features as well as bibliographical information on each tablet.
Users are welcome to contact us if they need any support in the usage of the database or to suggest any improvement at the following addresses:

Prof. Dr. Werner Rieß: werner.riess@uni-hamburg.de
Dr. Sara Chiarini: sara.chiarini@uni-hamburg.de

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 09/14/2021 - 11:28am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

August, 2021

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Julie Montione (Valencia College) - "Timeless Parallels: Classical Literature and Veteran Experiences"
  • Lauren Ristvet (University of Pennsylvania) - "Eastern Mediterranean Gallery"
  • Clifford Ando (University of Chicago) - "Roman Statutes: Renewing Roman Law"
View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 09/13/2021 - 1:35pm by Erik Shell.
A painting of four women sitting in a room weaving. One woman is spinning wool, two are arranging wool, and one is picking up tools off the floor. In the background is another room filled with women.

Welcome to Auia loca: New Paths in Classics, a new series launched by the SCS Communications Committee! Taking inspiration from Lucretius as he wanders through remote and unfrequented paths (auia Pieridum peragro loca nullius ante | trita solo, DRN 4.1–2), Auia loca seeks to spotlight new initiatives which themselves represent new and untrodden paths for Classics, as both a discipline and an academic field.

To kick off the series, it is my pleasure to introduce Hesperides, a new scholarly organization devoted to the study of Classics in Luso-Hispanic Worlds. Hesperides recently gained Category II affiliate status with the SCS, an affiliation which entitles the organization to a panel or paper session at the annual meeting. It joins a host of other SCS affiliated groups which likewise focus on the rich and complex receptions of the ancient Mediterranean across modernity, including Eos and the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus (AAACC).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/13/2021 - 10:23am by .
Corinthian black-figure terra-cotta votive tablet of slaves working in a mine. One figure is passing a bowl to another, one is carrying a basket, and one is wielding a tool.

Content advisory: this post includes an anti-Black epithet in the recounting of a personal experience.

I have always been interested in history. In high school, I took two history courses that drew my attention to the field. One was required, the typical AP U.S. History, and one was an elective, AP European History. Both courses involved the discussion of slavery and how it affected the development of different world powers. I was not interested in the rise of nations or how they acquired power. The individuals who were used, abused, and marginalized are what I find fascinating about studying history. From high school, my path was clear: study history and, more specifically, study the history of slavery.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 09/10/2021 - 9:51am by .
Text reads "Ego, Polyphemus, a Latin novella by Andrew Olimpi." A blue sky behind an upside-down image of a bald man with gray skin, wearing a black one-shoulder garment, with a single eye in the middle of his forehead.

The sudden rise of Latin novellas might come as a surprise to anyone outside of high-school classrooms. This genre, which didn’t exist seven years ago, now counts over a hundred published works. These novellas are largely written by and for those outside the world of higher ed, but they should be of interest to the larger scholarly community—not just because they will increasingly form the background and expectations of Latin students coming into college, but also because they are one part of a larger pedagogical movement that is in the midst of transforming the teaching of Latin.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 09/07/2021 - 10:18am by .

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