CFP: Annual Meeting for Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.
AMPRAW 2021 will be held at Columbia University in the City of New York (USA) from Thursday, November 11 to Saturday, November 13, 2021, in collaboration with the Department of Classics at Columbia University, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Columbia University Libraries Journals.
Due to the unpredictability caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are not yet able to confirm that the conference will take place in person. We hope that this will be possible; however, we are also making plans to accommodate a hybrid or online-only event. We will keep you updated as the situation evolves. Please be aware that, if the conference will be in person, we are unable to guarantee travel reimbursements to speakers, but we might be able to offer support on a need basis.
 

Confirmed keynote speaker:
Dr. Patrice Rankine (University of Richmond, Virginia)
 

This year's theme will be Center & Periphery in the Classics: Theory, Practice and Turning Points. The liminal features of the US (and of New York City in particular) inspired us to focus on this topic. Reception Studies in Classics are still treated as “peripheral” in many places, including this country, in spite of their increasing importance. In particular, they have been sidelined both by those who advocate the study of Classics as an unquestionable discipline, and those who wish to do away with the classical heritage completely. Framing the discussion in terms of center and periphery has the effect of illuminating the ways in which this dichotomy has historically inhabited – and haunted – academia. Conversations about how the Classics contributed to create the myth of a pure and privileged Western culture against which all attempts at intervention have been delegitimized are becoming more and more frequent within North American universities. Hosting AMPRAW at Columbia will facilitate a most important and timely dialogue around how we define what gets treated as a center and why, and who is left out. Moreover, the concepts of center and periphery need not be understood strictly as geographical or sociopolitical ideas; central to the discussion about the discipline of Classics and its future is the question of its methodologies. Peripheral receptions would also encompass works realized through innovative methodological approaches, both at the research and at the pedagogical level. The theme we propose will open up some areas within the discipline as it is traditionally conceived of: in particular, it could call into question the primacy attributed to the Classical canon, allowing for voices generally disregarded to regain a central place within the scholarly world. Not least, Columbia is stimulated and inspired by its own location – New York City being a historical crossroad of cultures, it makes such a renegotiation even more compelling than elsewhere. The city would provide a perfect setting for this meeting, insofar as it showcases the attractiveness of the center, while also revealing how the periphery exists within and is in tension with it.
 

We invite papers of 20-25 minutes dealing with any aspect of Classical Reception(s). Possible topics might be related, but are not limited to, the following areas:

• Classics Inside and Outside the Canon; Classics Inside and Outside Academia
• Decolonizing the Classics
• Classics & Activism
• New Pedagogical Strategies in Classics
• Translation Studies
• Classics and Gender, Sexuality and Queer Studies
• Classics as Public Humanities
 

We encourage proposals in the fields of, but not limited to, archaeology, literary studies, linguistics, (art) history, media studies, religious studies, cultural studies, history of law and political science, dealing with all time periods. The conference will be held in English, for the sake of convenience and accessibility. We acknowledge that this choice is in itself political and problematic, as it betrays a certain history of cultural hegemony and power. We will also encourage our speakers to think explicitly about their own relationship with this issue.
Moreover, we are working with the Columbia University Libraries to create a digital publication containing the proceedings of the conference. We hope that this will make participating to AMPRAW an even more productive and exciting opportunity for graduate students and early researchers in the field.
 

If you would like to present a paper at AMPRAW 2021, please send an abstract of around 200 words to ampraw2021@gmail.com by June 15th 2021, together with a short biography stating your name, affiliation, and contact address. Please indicate in your submission whether you would like to apply for a travel reimbursement. Applicants will be selected and notified by the first week of July.

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Funerary relief of a priest of Magna Mater (gallus) from Lavinium. Rome, Capitoline Museums (mid-second century AD). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

In Dialogue: Trans Studies and Classics works to bring some of the insights and lived experiences found in transgender studies into conversation with the Classics, in the hope that bringing these into dialogue with each other will enrich our pedagogy, deepen our understanding of what gender as an identity category even means, and help critique the various ways gender has been used as an instrument of power throughout history, while also creating a more inclusive and supportive environment for our students. If you’d like to contribute to this column or have ideas that could add to this conversation, email Ky Merkley.

Photo courtesy of Michael Goyette 
Dr. Michael Goyette (he/him/his) is Instructor of Classics and Ancient Studies at Eckerd College. His teaching and research focus on ancient medicine, ancient science, gender, ancient drama, pedagogy, and reception. The question of embodiment unites these various interests. Being at a teaching college with a high number of STEM majors, he is always looking for ways to illuminate the intersections between the sciences and humanities.

This transcript has been lightly edited.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/12/2021 - 10:07am by .
Header Image: Etruscan Alabaster Cinerary Urn with bas-relief that represents Odysseus and the Sirens. 3rd-2nd Cent. BCE. Museo Guarnacci, Volterra, Italy.

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiativeby the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 98 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. Awardees are selected by the SCS Committee on Classics in the Community. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 10 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and most recently, India.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 04/09/2021 - 9:58am by .
Emerging Scholars NYU Center for Ancient Studies images of landscape, statues, manuscripts
The NYU Center for Ancient Studies is seeking to engage the work of current PhD candidates as part of a new Emerging Scholars video presentation series, beginning in spring 2021. In this series, we aim to showcase research that takes innovative approaches to the study of the ancient world or that incorporates non-traditional materials and/or methods. We are also especially interested in highlighting the work of scholars from groups that are and have historically been marginalized and underrepresented in the fields of ancient studies and the academy at large.

The presentation format of the videos will feature individual PhD candidates who briefly describe their research and then engage in conversation with an NYU faculty member that positions this work in relationship to broader scholarship. These videos will be advertised as part of the Center's academic program and highlighted on our website.  

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/08/2021 - 9:21pm by Helen Cullyer.

CfP: Affect, Intensity, Antiquity (Online Conference)

Organizers: Chiara Graf and Adrian Gramps (St Andrews)

Confirmed Speakers: Aaron Kachuck (Trinity College, Cambridge / UCLouvain), Alex Purves (UCLA), Ben Radcliffe (Loyola Marymount), Mario Telò (UC Berkeley)

sed cur heu, Ligurine, cur
manat rara meas lacrima per genas?

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/07/2021 - 2:26pm by Erik Shell.
The homepage of Alpheios

Alpheios Reading Tools (henceforth Alpheios) is an open-source web extension that allows users to access information about Greek, Latin, Classical Arabic, or Persian text on any web page. After enabling the extension in Chrome, Safari, or Firefox, you simply double-click on any word on any page to see definitions, morphology, usages, and grammatical information. 

Figure 1: Alpheios Reading Tools integrates fluidly with the online Loeb Classical Library.
Figure 1: Alpheios Reading Tools integrates fluidly with the online Loeb Classical Library.

As an avid user of Alpheios in my capacities as both a Ph.D. student and instructor, I jumped at the chance to speak with Harry Diakoff and Bridget Almas, two of the founding members of Alpheios. Harry Diakoff is currently the president of the board of The Alpheios Project, Ltd., which is a registered 501(c); Bridget Almas is the Executive director and Chief Software Architect for the project.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/05/2021 - 10:18am by .

The conference "Contact, Colonialism, and Comparison" will take place over Zoom April 16-17, 2021. Please visit the event page here for further information, including a tentative schedule and list of participants. Conference papers are being made available to participants in advance, and sessions during the event itself will begin with an introductory contribution from a respondent followed by a brief author response and then open discussion. If you'd like to register for the conference, please fill out this online registration form to receive access to the papers as well as a Zoom link closer to the date.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/05/2021 - 7:49am by Erik Shell.

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.
AMPRAW 2021 will be held at Columbia University in the City of New York (USA) from Thursday, November 11 to Saturday, November 13, 2021, in collaboration with the Department of Classics at Columbia University, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Columbia University Libraries Journals.
Due to the unpredictability caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are not yet able to confirm that the conference will take place in person. We hope that this will be possible; however, we are also making plans to accommodate a hybrid or online-only event. We will keep you updated as the situation evolves. Please be aware that, if the conference will be in person, we are unable to guarantee travel reimbursements to speakers, but we might be able to offer support on a need basis.
 

Confirmed keynote speaker:
Dr. Patrice Rankine (University of Richmond, Virginia)
 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 03/30/2021 - 12:25pm by Erik Shell.

Chères et chers collègues,

L’appel à communication pour les sections parallèles du prochain congrès international d’épigraphie grecque et latine est toujours en cours, jusqu’au 30 mars 2021. Vous trouverez sur le site du congrès (https://ciegl2022.sciencesconf.org/) la liste de ces sections. Nous rappelons que l’appel à communications ne vaut que pour les sections parallèles et en aucun cas pour les sessions plénières, qui seront constituées d’un rapport et n’accueillent pas de communications.

Les propositions de communications doivent être envoyées à cette adresse : ciegl2022@sciencesconf.org. L’argumentaire les accompagnant peut être formulé dans une des cinq langues du congrès, allemand, anglais, français, espagnol et italien.

Vous pouvez toujours vous abonner à la liste de diffusion :

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/29/2021 - 2:09pm by Erik Shell.
Dr. Rock-McCutcheon and the cast of Antigone for Arts Day 2019 at Wilson College. Image courtesy of Bonnie Rock-McCutcheon.

Our fourth interview in the Contingent Faculty Series is a virtual conversation between Joshua Nudell and Dr. Bonnie Rock-McCutcheon. Dr. Rock-McCutcheon received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, where she wrote a dissertation on the role of spectacle in gifts to Delian Apollo in the Archaic period, before becoming a Lecturer of Classics at Wilson College in Chambersburg, PA. Her current research focuses on sociality with the gods, the role of gender in myth, and the use of graphic novels in the classroom. She was recently featured in an episode of the Creators Unite podcast, talking about her experiences using comic books and graphic novels in the classroom. When not teaching a wide range of courses for both the history and classics programs, Dr. Rock-McCutcheon spends time with her three cats and quilting.

Joshua Nudell: When we talk career pathways, there is, at least in theory, a formula for how one lands a tenure-track job, but less discussion of how one makes a path as a contingent faculty member. What was your journey into your current position?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/29/2021 - 11:41am by .
Header image: Gold death-mask, known as the ‘mask of Agamemnon’. Mycenae, Grave Circle A, Grave V, 16th cent. BC. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, in March 2021 has been renamed and reimagined as the Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative. Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities supports projects that seek to engage broader publics—individuals, groups, and communities—in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 98 projects ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. Awardees are selected by the SCS Committee on Classics in the Community.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/26/2021 - 10:01am by .

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