Conference: Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities The Hebrew University of Jerusalem cordially invite you to a Joint Conference on

Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

Sunday-Wednesday June 20-23, 2021

Sunday, June 20, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

17:00-19:00 Opening Session

Greetings

Sergiu Hart, Head of the Humanities Division,Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Organizing Committee

Keynote Lecture

Chair: Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Tel Aviv University

Niall W. Slater, Emory University Textualization from the Bottom Up

Monday, 21 June, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

9:30-11:00 Session I:

Linguistic AspectsChair: Hannah Rosén, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Aaron Koller, Yeshiva UniversityTextualization and Oralization in Early Near Eastern Writing

Ronald Blankenborg, Radboud UniversityDeictic Phonation in Textualization: Pragmatically Preserved Greek Particles

Rodrigo Verano, Complutense University of MadridHow to Make a Literary Text of a Conversation: Evidence from Plato’s Dialogues

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session II:

Material CultureChair: Benjamin Isaac, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University

Raymond F. Person, Jr., Ohio Northern University Textualization across Media: A Case Study Based on Person Reference in Talk and Material Culture

Teddy Fassberg, Tel Aviv University Speaking Objects as Texts

Manuela Giordano, University of Siena Textualizing Democracy and The Eion Herms

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session III:

Homer and Hesiod Chair: David Schaps, Bar-Ilan University

Elizabeth Minchin, Australian National UniversityMoving Towards Textualization: Evidence for Poetic Preparation in Homer

Massimo Giuseppetti, Università degli Studi Roma Tre Textualization as Interpolation? Reconsidering Repetition in Greek Epic Poetry

Ruth Scodel, University of MichiganWorks and Days and the Difficulties of Textualization

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45 Session IV:

Early PoetryChair: Deborah Gera, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Deborah Beck, University of Texas at AustinSappho, Lyric, and Biography: Textualization as a Mode of Thought

Jan Skarbek-Kazanecki, University of ŁodzThe Transmission of the Theognidean Tradition as a Mnemonic Cultural Practice

Andrea Rotstein, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Phoenician Oral Poetry: The Missing Link

Tuesday 22 June, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club Room 405The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

09:30-11:00 Session V:

Greek ProseChair: Jonathan Price, Tel Aviv University

Greetings: Barak Medina, Rector, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Giulia Donelli, University of Bristol Between Orality and Textuality: Epigraphical Letters and Early Greek Literary Prose

Christopher Haddad, Oxford University From Elocution to Epistolography

Uri Yiftach, Tel Aviv UniversityBetween Law and Phantasy: Court Proceedings as a Source on Language, Style and Literature

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session VI:

Textualizing Historical Figures Chair: Donna Shalev, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Il-Kweon Sir, Cambridge University Early Greek Tyrannic Discourse and the Textualization of the Tyrant

Margalit Finkelberg, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University Textualizing Socrates: Plato’s Version

Lisa Cordes, Humboldt UniversityTextualizing Historical Figures in Cicero’s Dialogues – Dynamics and Ambiguities

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club, Room 405 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

9:30-11:00 Session VII:

Textualizing Popular Traditions Chair: Joseph Geiger, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniela Dueck, Bar-Ilan UniversityTextualizing Naïve Geography in Classical Antiquity

Daniel Wendt, Free University Berlin(Con) Textualizing Anecdotes. Written Orality and Natural Narratives in Livy’s Early History of Rome

Sonia Pertsinidis, Australian National UniversityThe Eagle and the Serpent: Textualization and the Fables of Babrius

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 SessionVIII:

BetweenTextandPerformance Chair: Yoav Rinon, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniel Anderson, Coventry University Early Writing Metaphors in Performance

Łukasz Berger, Adam Mickiewicz UniversityOral Design in Plautus’ Verse: The Context of Rehearsal and Performance

Alexander Kirichenko, Humboldt UniversityHow to Do Things with Letters: Orality and Textuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session IX:

Late AntiquityChair: Gabriel Danzig, Bar-Ilan University

Han Baltussen, The University of AdelaideFact, Fiction or ‘Faction’? Eunapius’ Use of Written and Oral Sources

Chiara Militello, University of CataniaFrom Literacy to Orality and Back: The Complex Textualization of Late Neoplatonic Lectures

Hossein Sheikh, University of GöttingenEstablishment and Composition of the Zoroastrian Legal Corpus after the Muslim Conquests

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45  Session X:

Textualization and Religion Chair: Guy Stroumsa, Academy Member;

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Oxford University

Jordi Redondo, University of Valencia Oral Patterns in the Greek Pentateuch?

Maren Niehoff, The Hebrew University of JerusalemPreserving or Creating Orality in Texts? The Sermons of Origen and Rabbi Abbahu

Evgenia Moiseeva, Salzburg University The Rise of the Written Word in Manichaeism

Concluding Remarks

The conference will take place at The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Albert Einstein Square, 43 Jabotinsky St., Jerusalem, and at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus CampusThe event will be streamed live on the Israel Academy website: www.academy.ac.il and on Zoom by pre-registration

links to zoom and to registration for physical attendence

https://academy.ac.il/Index/Entry.aspx?nodeId=936&entryId=22423

link to conference site https://oralityliteracyxiv.wordpress.com

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Dear members,

We have a number of deadlines that fall prior to mid-November. Please see the following:

October 31: Nominations for the Forum Prize

November 1: Applications for annual meeting participation stipends and childcare / dependent care funding

November 1: Nominations and applications for the K-12 Teaching Excellence Award

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/21/2021 - 11:40am by Erik Shell.
A bronze bust of a man with short, wavy hair and a slightly pained expression on his face.

The Seleucid empire has long stood on the fringes of Classical scholarship. Following the conquest of the east by Alexander, the vast, multicultural construction lasted from 312–64 BCE, stretching from modern Turkey south to the Levantine coast and east into Afghanistan. Interdisciplinary by its very nature, Seleucid history straddles the boundaries of academic disciplines, languages, and methodologies, further fragmenting the study of an already fractured power. Recent holistic studies are rare, making the 2014 publication of Paul Kosmin’s comprehensive The Land of the Elephant Kings something of a groundbreaking study. The examination of what Kosmin calls the “territorialization” of the empire—the ideological constructions and experiences that bounded, ordered, and defined the imperial realms—changed the nature of Seleucid studies by intensifying the focus of the recent “spatial turn” in the humanities.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/18/2021 - 9:53am by .

(From the Classics Department at Princeton)

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 10/15/2021 - 9:14am by Erik Shell.
Poster for the play, Plautus's Casina. A minimalist digital design with a blue background; mountain shapes in pink, yellow, and orange; walls with windows in the same colors; and an ancient statue of a woman.

In the Spring of 2021, as her undergraduate UIC Honors College Capstone project, my student Luana Davila adapted and produced a version of Plautus’ Casina in the style of a telenovela. Due to COVID, she was not able to stage the play, but she produced a filmed version in collaboration with theater students at Columbia College in Chicago. For safety reasons, each actor’s scenes were filmed separately, then edited together. Below is an interview with Luana and the play’s director, Amy Gerwert Valdez, a Theater Directing major at Columbia.  [Editor’s note: the transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.]

Krishni Burns: Can we start with a description of your project?

Luana Davila: The project aimed to tie together patriarchal society in ancient Rome and in Latinx cultures (or in the case of this production, Mexico). My play was adapted in such a way that the original storyline was changed as little as possible, proving that its seemingly ridiculous events made for a believable tale in modern Mexico. This was done to show how interconnected the two cultures are, even though they existed thousands of years apart.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/11/2021 - 10:33am by Krishni Burns.

The members of the Committee on the C. J. Goodwin Award of Merit are delighted to announce that the 2021 winners of the Goodwin Awards are Aileen R. Das (University of Michigan), Ellen Oliensis (University of California Berkeley), and Andreas Willi (University of Oxford).

Please click on the names below to read the full award citations written by committee members David Konstan and James I. Porter (co-chairs), Harriet Flower, Richard Hunter, and Amy Richlin.

Aileen R. Das

Ellen Oliensis

Andreas Willi

Citation for Aileen R. Das, Galen and the Arabic Reception of Plato’s Timaeus, Cambridge University Press, 2020

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Sun, 10/10/2021 - 6:52pm by Helen Cullyer.
A Greek red-figure cup depicting the disembodied torso of a man, arms outstretched, and women on either side holding the torso

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 11 countries, including Canada, U.K., Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/08/2021 - 1:50pm by .
San Francisco

Hotel reservations are now open! 

The Hilton San Francisco Union Square is the official hotel for the 2022 Annual Meeting and will host the exhibit hall, all academic sessions, the opening night reception, and most related events.  The discounted group rate is $169 per night (plus applicable taxes). Additional rooms are available at the Hilton Parc 55 across the street.  A limited number are available for $159 per night (plus applicable taxes) for reservations made by October 31st.  Click on the links below to make your reservations. You can also make a reservation by calling 1-800-HILTONS and using code AIA or SCS to make your reservation. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/07/2021 - 3:26pm by Erik Shell.

Online Conference: “The Genre of Hymn in Antiquity”

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 10/06/2021 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.

The New England Classical Journal (NECJ) invites applications for the position of Book Review Editor, with the appointment to begin in December 2021.

The deadline for applications is 11:59 pm Eastern Time on Oct. 22, 2021. 

A publication of the Classical Association of New England (CANE), NECJ is a biannual, peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles, notes, and reviews on all aspects of classical antiquity. The journal is an Open Access Publication and is available at https://crossworks.holycross.edu/necj/ 

NECJ aims to publish reviews of books on a wide range of topics related to classical antiquity. Each issue of NECJ contains 4-6 book reviews of 1,200-1,500 words each, and the Book Review Editor is responsible for selecting books for review; finding reviewers; and working with reviewers to help them submit their completed reviews by the deadline. In this position the successful candidate will work with the journal’s Editor, Aaron Seider, and Managing Editor, Ruth Breindel, and will receive an honorarium of $1,000/per year for their work on the journal.

View full article. | Posted in Organizations on Wed, 10/06/2021 - 9:51am by Erik Shell.
Two pairs of teachers and students. The teacher on the left, seated on an uncushioned stool, plays a flute, his mantle pushed down to his waist. His young pupil stands facing him, wrapped in his mantle. The teacher in the center is seated on a cushion.

Our sixth interview in the Contingent Faculty Series is a virtual conversation between Dr. Theodora B. Kopestonsky and Dr. Stephanie Kimmey. Dr. Stephanie Kimmey recently joined the Department of Classics at Colorado College as a Visiting Assistant Professor. She received her PhD in Art History and Archaeology from the University of Missouri, Columbia in 2017. Stephanie’s research explores the intersection of Greek religion and daily life through everyday objects and ceramics to better understand the individual, personal experiences through the things people leave behind. She has been active in excavations throughout Greece since 2006, working at Nemea, Mycenae, and Aidonia. Before joining Colorado College, Stephanie worked as the Assistant Director of the MU Writing Center.

Theodora B. Kopestonsky: How did you become interested in the field of Classics and, more specifically, what led you to Greek archaeology and field work?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/04/2021 - 10:32am by .

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