Norma Wynick Goldman (1922-2011)

October 11, 2011 was a remarkably beautiful afternoon to celebrate a  remarkably beautiful soul at the Community Arts Auditorium at Wayne State University in Detroit. And I was honored to be there to speak, not only on behalf of Wayne State University and the Department of Classical and Modern Languages Literatures and Cultures, but also on behalf of the  American Classical League, the American Philological Association, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, the Classical Association of New England, the Classical Society of the American Academy in Rome,  the Michigan Classical Conference and the classics honor fraternity, Eta Sigma Phi: each of which asked me to present  their condolences.

Norma Wynick Goldman(1922-2011) was an ambassador for Wayne State University in general, and for the discipline of classical studies in particular.  She was associated with Wayne State in one way or another for more than six decades beginning in 1939 when she enrolled  as an undergraduate. For such a small person she had a very long reach --and truth be told her reach never seemed to exceed her grasp.  She was by discipline a Latinist with a broad range of interests in the classical world  both near and far. In 1957 to further interest in Greece and Rome among high school teachers and the community at large, she and Dr. Edith M.A. Kovach (1921-2009) founded the Detroit Classical Association. Norma’s work won her a Distinguished Alumni Award from Wayne State in 1985, an Ovatio from the Classical Association of the Middle West and South in 1988, and a Merita Award from the American Classical League in 2006.

Her books include:

1)Latin via Ovid,  coauthored with Dr. Jacob Nyenhius, professor of classics at Wayne from 1962-1975. Accompanying the textbook, she developed a workbook entitled Practice! Practice!   Now in its 3rd edition,  Latin Via Ovid is Wayne State University Press’s  best selling book of all time!

2) English Grammar for Students of Latin which she coauthored with Ladislas Szymanski in 1983.

3) The Janus View From the American Academy in Rome: Essays on the Janiculum, coauthored with Katherine Geffcken,  (American Academy in Rome, 2007).

 4)New Light from Ancient Cosa which was a set of articles continuing the pioneering work of Frank E. Brown (1908-1988) begun in 1947 at Cosa, to which Norma contributed her own essay (Peter Lang, 2001).

5)  Cosa, the Lamps, coauthored with Cleo Fitch,  which studied the oil lamps found at Cosa (University of Michigan Press, 1994).  

Norma had the  “hands on” approach of a craftsman. She  was in fact a potter and a seamstress. These talents led her to try recovering the formula for Roman concrete and to reconstructing the awning over the Colosseum- both of which were featured on television by BBC’s  Nova  in 1995.  Her keen interest in Roman styles of dress and Roman foot-wear resulted in more than 30 live fashion shows presented here and abroad,  and 2 essays published in The World of Roman Costume (University of Wisconsin Press. 1993). In 1993 she made an hour long video called “Let’s Wrap:1000 Years of Roman Costume” with Mary Yelda and George Booth. The video was distributed by the Teaching Materials and Resource Center of the American Classical League and it taught viewers how to dress like a Roman. As a recent audience member  in attendence at  a live presentation  said:“I really want to be 80 years old and still teaching Latin like the “Let’s wrap” lady, Norma Goldman. No joke, I watched two live hours of ancient Roman runway at my first ACL convention and that woman is a firecracker.” http://www.aclclassics.org/store/multimedia/dvd/let-s-wrap-ars-vestiendi.html (10/17/2011)

Norma also made a special study of Detroit’s own architect Albert Kahn (1869-1942). To us at Wayne State University he is known as the architect of the little Pantheon, the former Temple Beth El on Woodward Avenue, which today houses the University’s Bonstelle Theater.  Norma designed  a class about Kahn, his buildings,  and his work for Henry Ford, and she led  many “Albert Kahn” tours around the city. Few of us know that Albert Kahn himself evinced his deep interest in Graeco-Roman antiquity by membership in the American Philological Association  (1924-1942).

Norma was no armchair scholar. Truth be told she was  an unusually intrepid traveler. She crossed the Atlantic to work at the American Academy in Rome 31 years in a row. Her last trip was in the fall of 2010, and in the words of Dr. T. Corey Brennan, Andrew W. Mellon Professor, American Academy in Rome“there was not a walk, talk, bus trip, lecture, conference, or concert that she missed.”  It is no surprise that  Dr. Mel Ravitz,(1924-2010) Wayne State University Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Detroit City Council member (1962-72; 1982-97) called Norma “a spark plug.” As a member of the Council, Dr. Ravitz was delighted  when she,  Dr.  Michaela Sampson and I brought students from  Dr. Sampson’s Latin classes at Martin Luther King High School to perform an excerpt of their Latin play in the Council chambers during the early 1990s.

To many Norma’s most notable achievement was maintaining the perennial joy in learning that runs through every aspect of her work. Her books, her lectures, and her life were bathed in the warm glow of her exuberant enthusiasm. And those around her caught fire in the refractions of  her light. Norma was excitement personified. And now  the Kalends of this October—October 1, the Saturday she left us --- has revealed a beautiful symmetry in the circuit of Norma’s life as a scholar and as a spouse. For she recently  finished a work of scholarship that had interested her husband, Dr. Bernard M. Goldman (1922- 2006) from his days at the University of Michigan as a student of Dr. Clark Hopkins, (1895-1976) professor of classical art & archaeology. Their book, My Dura Europos The Letters of Susan M. Hopkins, 1927-1935, (which gives readers an inside view of  Dr. Clark’s excavations at this remote outpost of the Roman empire through the eyes of his wife Susan),  is due out from Wayne State University Press this November.  The completion of My Dura Europos represents both the intersection and the circumference of Norma’s and Bernard’s life together. It is also a final lesson  from this master teacher and scholar instructing us to look to the imago suae vitae to find her lasting legacy. We are all her best students now!Norma Wynick Goldman was buried on October 5, 2011 next to her husband of sixty-one years at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery in Phoenix, AZ. She is survived by their son Mark, daughter-in-law Carolyn, and  two beloved grandchildren, Liam and Grace,  of Phoenix, AZ.

Michele Valerie Ronnick

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"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

"Old Victories, New Voices"

Lecture and Concert Video Nancy Felson, Helen Eastman, Alex Silverman, & Live Canon Ensemble

In the fifth century B.C., Pindar of Thebes wrote odes to celebrate the victories of great athletes at the pan-hellenic games. He celebrated their prowess by re-telling the myths of ancient Greece in a way that elevated the athletes' status and suggested that they, like the heroes of old, would be glorious forever. But the mythic women had little to say. Instead, they were frequently abducted or maligned. In this lecture-concert, learn more about some of those silenced women in new music and poetry and hear some modern victory odes, including two that celebrate winners in the recent U.S. elections.

The program, which is part of our Performing Pindar Project, aired Thursday, November 19 at the University of Georgia's (virtual) Spotlight on the Arts Festival. It featured new writing by Live Canon poets, performed by members of Live Canon Ensemble, and new music by composer Alex Silverman and lyricist Helen Eastman. The original music includes ballads of Cyrene and an instrumental piece based on the meter of Pindar’s Ninth Pythian Victory Ode. This video should appeal to a wide audience of students and faculty -- anyone who welcomes creative responses to ancient poetry.

Please click on the link below anytime in the next two weeks to see the full program:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 11/25/2020 - 2:19pm by Erik Shell.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. As part of this initiative the SCS has been funding a variety of projects ranging from reading groups comparing ancient to modern leadership practices to collaborations with artists in theater, music, and dance. Most of the projects funded take place in the US and Canada, though the initiative is growing and has funded projects in the UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, and Puerto Rico. This post centers on two projects that explore the experience of studying Classics in secondary schools, and amplify the voices of Classics students during their early encounters with the field.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 11/25/2020 - 7:53am by .

On November 3, 1903, the Department of the Isthmus separated from the Republic of Colombia and became its own republic. This act ended 82 years of history between them. The reason? to allow the US to build a canal after Colombia refused to in August of that same year.

The new republic entered the twentieth century with great emotion and with the dream of finally seeing an interoceanic canal. New projects were sought, but there was also an uncertain future accompanied by the first conflicts with the Canal Zone and the United States. Which were initiated by the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty of 1903, as in Article 1 indicates that the US will guarantee the independence of the Republic and the right to intervene in the affairs of Panama as it is set forth in Article 136 of the 1904 Constitution. The former raised doubts, and questions not only from the neighbors countries that said that Panama was now a US a protectorate and that in fact it was not Latin American, but also by the same Panamanians that felt that way and understood it as an attack on sovereignty and as a risk on the national identity and Panamanian culture.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/16/2020 - 7:57am by .

Res Difficiles 2.0: A Digital Conference On Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity In Classics

Organizers: Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)
Date: Saturday, March 20, 2021
Platform: Webinar

ResDiff 1.0 was timely respite in the midst of a pandemic that forced us to change whether and how we convene and exacted costs disproportionately in underserved communities by reinforcing the durable inequities that have come to define our times. What was conceived as an intimate gathering on the campus of Mary Washington for those teaching Classics was transformed into a digital event attracting 250 registrants from twelve countries. In our papers and conversations, we explored how people on the margins in our texts and contexts are invited—or pushed further from—the center, and explored avenues through with such marginalization might be addressed. Following the conference, recordings of the presentations were made available online at resdifficiles.com. Furthermore, a selection of those papers is being prepared for publication in a co-edited series of consecutive issues in Ancient History Bulletin which will start to appear in 2021.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Sun, 11/15/2020 - 1:21pm by Erik Shell.

Some months ago, a piece by Leah Mitchell and Eli Rubies on Classics and reception studies in the 21st century reiterated the importance of studying the reception of classical antiquity. It was a reminder that reception of classical material itself predates the scholarly field devoted to it.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/09/2020 - 7:29am by .

(Please Read Part I First)

Playing Cleopatra: Hollywood and Anglophone Television Castings

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 11/03/2020 - 6:02am by .

On October 11 2020, American screenwriter and producer of Greek descent Laeta Kalogridis posted this tweet:

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/02/2020 - 9:13am by .

Dear colleague,

You probably don’t remember the muffins.

Over the last decade, we’ve tried all kinds of messages to encourage you to support the SCS Annual Fund.  We’ve used inspirational quotes from Homer, Ovid, Plutarch, and Cavafy; we’ve included testimonials from grateful recipients of fellowships; we’ve offered matching gifts; we’ve set our text as limericks; and yes, we’ve even tried muffins as metaphors.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/28/2020 - 1:58pm by Helen Cullyer.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. As part of this initiative the SCS has been funding a variety of projects ranging from reading groups comparing ancient to modern leadership practices to collaborations with artists in theater, music, and dance. Most of the projects funded take place in the US and Canada, though the initiative is growing and has funded projects in the UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, and Puerto Rico. This post discusses a project for school-age children in rural Italy that draws attention to the ancient past through the contemporary world.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 10/28/2020 - 10:56am by .

FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH AND STUDY AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY 2021-2022
 

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is pleased to announce the academic programs and fellowships for the 2021-2022 academic year at the Gennadius Library. Opened in 1926 with 26,000 volumes from diplomat and bibliophile Joannes Gennadius, the Gennadius Library now holds a richly diverse collection of over 146,000 books and rare bindings, archives, manuscripts, and works of art illuminating the Hellenic tradition and neighboring cultures. The Library has become an internationally renowned center for the study of Greek history, literature, and art, especially from the Byzantine period to modern times.
 

COTSEN TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP FOR RESEARCH IN GREECE: Short-term travel award of $2,000 for senior scholars and graduate students, for work at the Gennadius Library. Open to all nationalities. At least one month of residency required. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months.

DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2021.
 

THE GEORGE PAPAIOANNOU FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidates or recent PhDs writing on Greece in the 1940’s and the post-war period, civil wars and the history of the Second World War. Fellows are required to make use of the George Papaioannou Papers housed at the Archives of the ASCSA. Open to all nationalities. School fees are waived for a maximum of two months. Stipend of €2,000. 

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 10/26/2020 - 7:23am by Erik Shell.

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