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Pieter Coecke van Aelst, the elder (Flemish, 1502-1550). 'Saint Jerome in His Study,' ca. 1530. oil on panel. Walters Art Museum (37.256): Acquired by Henry Walters. Image via Wikimedia under Public Domain.

Literary translation is a scholarly and a creative act in which a reader of the Greek or Latin becomes the writer for new readers. Like all readers, translators interpret the text, and in the field of classics, apply their scholarship and their poetic abilities to put the text into a modern language. Since many readers of our translations cannot read the original, they depend on us to transmit the voice of the original writer and to be transparent in our choices. By that I mean that the translator should proclaim whether the translation is aiming for accuracy (and what that means in particular), whether it adds or subtracts from the source text (such as Richmond Lattimore inserting his own lines into Sappho’s fragments), whether the work is an adaptation rather than a translation (clearly proclaimed in Luis Alfaro’s “Mojada: A Medea in Los Angelos”).

Diane Arnson Svarlien and I co-organized “A Century of Translating Poetry” (the first panel sponsored by the Committee on the Translation of Classical Authors). The panel had a good mix of scholars, including active translators (both organizers, Gonçalves, Hadas, and Wilson), two non-translators (graduate student Lee and professor Vandiver), a poet (Hadas) and a performer of Latin poetry (Gonçalves). We had a lively discussion after the five talks with about forty audience members in a packed small room.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/31/2019 - 8:37pm by Diane Rayor.

The Department of Spanish Studies and the Department of Classical Philology of the University in Lodz would like to invite you to the second interdisciplinary academic conference:

Rome and Iberia.
Diversity of Relations from Antiquity to Modernity.

April 25-26, 2019

While the Roman conquest was not the beginning of the Iberian Peninsula history, Roman presence in the region profoundly affected the lives of its inhabitants. Those relations left a permanent mark on the Peninsula and the vestiges of Ancient Roman culture still abound not only there, but also in other countries which came under Iberian influence. This issue is still avidly researched and debated by scholars of different fields.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/29/2019 - 8:13am by Erik Shell.

The Politics of Empire in the Roman Republic: The Forum Unbounded (280 BCE – 20 CE)

Keynote Speaker: Professor Arthur Eckstein, University of Maryland

Georgetown University’s Villa Le Balze, Fiesole, Italy
29 April – 2 May 2020

The growth of Roman power across the Mediterranean, as well as the shape it took, was dictated by debates, elections, and spectacles in the city of Rome.  But interactions in ever-shifting borderlands – among local populations and their leaders, Roman generals and armies, senatorial envoys, subcontractors, traders, translators, and more – were equally important.  “Imperial politics,” historian Charles Maier has written, “…originates from the outside in as well as proceeding from the center out” (Among Empires, p. 78).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 01/25/2019 - 10:54am by Erik Shell.
31st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
VOULIAGMENI (ATHENS RIVIERA)-GREECE:12-15 JULY 2019

on the topic:

"THE POSSIBILITY OF EUDAIMONIA (HAPPINESS AND HUMAN FLOURISING) IN THE WORLD TODAY"

The Conference  will be held at the seaside town of Vouliagmeni (Athens Riviera, Greece), at the Hotel Amarilia (Saint Nicholas Street 13, 16671 VOULIAGMENI, tel.+302108990391, Fax+302108955790, info@amarilia.grwww.amarilia.gr).

The IAGP calls upon philosophers and thinkers throughout the world to participate in the 31st International Conference of Philosophy.

We have selected this topic based primarily on two factors:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 01/25/2019 - 9:28am by Erik Shell.

I love Classics, but it isn’t my first love; that was art, specifically Pre-Raphaelite art. A visit to my local museum with school introduced me to them, and my eight-year-old self thought it was fate when I found a painting with my name that I thought was by Edward Burne-Jones (Amy by Arthur Hughes; it wasn’t spelt right but it wasn’t often anyway, and still isn’t). A postcard sent shortly after the museum visit by a relative, featuring A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse (but wrongly attributed on said postcard to Burne-Jones) cemented my love of the Pre-Raphaelites, and Burne-Jones in particular.

Fast forward four years. I’m introduced to my second love – and the reason I’m writing this – Classics. Classics wasn’t my goal: I chose Latin over German as a foreign language at secondary school, with a view to becoming a veterinarian. Being a vet didn’t sound as glamorous as being an artist, so I eventually plumped for art. But Classics stayed very close to me, trumped as a subject for study at university only by my great ambition to get paid to paint pictures like Edward Burne-Jones.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/24/2019 - 2:48pm by Aimee Hinds.

(Updated January 25, 2019; sent by Dimos Spatharas)

Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions Conference

Memory and Emotions in Antiquity

Dear colleagues,

We are delighted to announce the Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions III Conference on Memory and Emotions in Antiquity. The event will take place on 6-8 December 2019 at Rethymno, Crete.

We are now inviting proposals for papers of 25 minutes. Submissions should include titled abstracts (max 350 words) and a short bio (max 50 words). Please submit your proposals jointly to George Kazantzidis (gkazantzidis@upatras.gr) and Dimos Spatharas (spatharasd@gmail.com) no later than 23 February 2019.

Revised versions of papers presented at the Ancient Emotions conferences are considered for publication in the series Trends in Classics-Ancient Emotions (De Gruyter) edited by the organizers.

https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/502932

http://philology.upatras.gr/medical-understandings-emotions-antiquity/

Confirmed speakers:

Keynote speaker: Angelos Chaniotis (IAS, Princeton)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/24/2019 - 8:53am by Erik Shell.

Call for Abstracts: Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle

Deadline: February 15, 2019

Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle is Volume 1d of Eleatic Ontology: Origin and Reception, a multi-volume work on the development and influence of Eleatic ontology. This project is supported by the UNESCO Chair inArchai: The Plural Origins of Western Thought at the Universidade de Brasilia. The project’s aim is to gather in one place an account of Eleatic ontology, its first developments, and its lasting influence by soliciting scholarly articles from the international academic community.The resulting publications will be digital, open-access, and free of charge. The site will be hosted by the publisher of Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal: Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra IUC. 

Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle is edited by David Bronstein (Georgetown) and Fabián Mié (UNL Argentina). Confirmed contributors include: Lucas Angioni, Marcelo Boeri, Elisabetta Cattanei, Michel Crubellier, Rin Siirkel, Thomas Johansen, and Barbara Sattler. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/24/2019 - 8:46am by Erik Shell.
This post has been revised to include a letter from members and a response to that letter:
 
The SCS Board of Directors has approved the following statement (January 22, 2019):
 
The SCS Board of Directors condemns the practice of writing and circulating anonymous ad hominem attacks. Frank exchange among its members, including openly expressed criticism, are ideals of a scholarly community.  Anonymous attacks contradict the principle of frank exchange.
 

Letter to President Mary T. Boatwright, President-Elect Sheila Murnaghan, Immediate Past President Joseph Farrell

25 January 2019

Dear colleagues:

We write in response to the SCS Board of Directors’ statement on anonymous online attacks, published on the SCS website on January 22nd, 2019, which reads as follows:

The SCS Board of Directors condemns the practice of writing and circulating anonymous ad hominem attacks. Frank exchange among its members, including openly expressed criticism, are ideals of a scholarly community.  Anonymous attacks contradict the principle of frank exchange.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 1:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

SCS is planning to make available videos of the Sesquicentennial sessions and the public lectures by Luis Alfaro and Mary Beard.  We are currently preparing videos for release. Please note that we will not distribute any video of a paper or lecture without consent from the presenter(s).

The SCS Board of Directors has approved the following resolution of thanks for the 2019 public lecturers.

The SCS Board of Directors hereby thanks playwright Luis Alfaro for delivering a public lecture hosted by the SCS at the 2019 Annual Meeting in San Diego; we are also grateful to Classics and Social Justice and the Onassis Foundation USA for co-organizing the lecture and inviting Luis Alfaro to speak. On the first night of the Meetings in San Diego, he generously shared his creative process with an audience of conference attendees and members of the public. This process involves bringing ancient myths and plays to communities across the US and reimagining them as modern dramas, not for but with community members as active participants in the creation and performance of those dramas. We will post video of his lecture when it is available, so as to make it accessible to those who could not attend. For his lecture, for his plays that connect the ancient and modern, and for bringing new voices to classical studies, we thank Luis Alfaro.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 10:08am by Helen Cullyer.

Thank you to all those who have emailed, written blogs, and posted on social media suggestions for the 2020 Annual Meeting. We are interested in, and are already working on, plans for 2020 incorporating many of the excellent suggestions that we have received. In 2020, we plan to address race and racism in the field head-on with workshops, panels, and special events organized by the SCS President and a number of committees, and to promote equity in all aspects of our programming. We will also work closely with our affiliated groups.

Please help us by submitting abstracts for diverse, inclusive, and innovative panels, workshops, papers, and lightning talks, and see the calls for abstracts already posted. Please consult the individual calls for submission deadlines for affiliated group, organizer-refereed and committee panels on our 2020 Annual Meeting page. Deadlines for panel and workshop proposals and individual abstracts submitted to the program committee will fall in April and the program submission system will open in late February.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 8:52am by Erik Shell.

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