Skip to main content

Blog: Vox Populi: Podcasting and Equity at the SCS Annual Meeting

By Curtis Dozier | December 31, 2018

Last week the SCS blog reflected on what really does seem to be a golden age of Classics podcasting, where audio content that you can listen to on a portable device whenever convenient has made it easier than ever to teach people about ancient history, to help teachers develop the active use of ancient languages, and to share cutting Read more …

Blog: Siliquasparsiones: Podcasts in Latin

By Curtis Dozier | December 27, 2018

By Curtis Dozier and Christopher B. Polt

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3–6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. This week we are focusing on the Podcasting the Classics panel (8:00am–10:30am on Saturday, Jan. 5) by pointing to some resources for those who want to explore the medium more fully.

One of the best ways to build fluency in a language is to listen to that language being spoken at a comprehensible level of complexity. This is no less true for Latin than for any other language, but until recently the options for listening to Latin being Read more …

A New Outlet for Classical Scholars to Publish Timely Writing (and get paid for it!)

By Curtis Dozier | May 13, 2015

Some time ago I expressed a hope that more classicists would write in public venues, so I was very excited when the Paideia Institute announced that they were launching Eidolon, a new online publication for timely writing by Classical Scholars. I’ve written here before about Paideia, which in my opinion is responsible for some of the most exciting new programming in our field, and Eidolon is no Read more …

Designing Classics Courses for "Significant Learning"

By Curtis Dozier | August 15, 2014

At the beginning of the summer I wrote about resources that have helped me with my writing and research. Now, as we start thinking about our classes for the Fall, I’d like to mention a book that has helped me understand the value of my work teaching the Classics and taught me to design classes that convey that value to students. My fellow blogger Ted Gellar-Goad recently wrote about the importance, and difficulty, of helping students “see value” in our courses. He rightly calls this “the hardest lever of motivation to pull.” And it’s not just students who need to Read more …

Support for Summer Writing and Research

By Curtis Dozier | June 6, 2014

The summer is in full swing for most of us and those who for whatever personal or institutional reason (try to) maintain a research program are turning our thoughts to what we want to accomplish before classes start again. It’s exciting to be able to devote ourselves more fully to our writing and research, but the summer poses not only that opportunity but its own set of challenges: with so much unstructured time and so many appealing distractions it can easily slip away.

Below I’m going to describe several books that I’ve found useful for developing and maintaining a research practice during summers and even during the semester. I’m not the most productive writer in the world but I’ve become much more productive from implementing many of the techniques in these books.  This list should also be of Read more …

Language-Focused Summer Programs in Italy and Greece

By Curtis Dozier | February 12, 2014

In my post last month I referred to the crucial role that study abroad played in my formation as a classicist, and the papers delivered at a panel on study-abroad programs at this year’s annual meeting showed that I am not alone. Those papers (by McGinn, Severy-Hoven, Thakur, Morris, and Read more …

A Healthy Dose of Skepticism...But No More

By Curtis Dozier | December 18, 2013

Garrett Fagan recently posed an interesting question in his very useful discussion of the crisis in the humanities: “should we embrace the competition for students in a marketplace of majors?” That my answer is “yes” is probably evident from my last post, in which I urged classicists to participate in public discourse in order to insure that the public image of Classics is both attractive to our students and acceptable to their parents. Not everyone shares this view. Many scholars cringe at the economic and corporate metaphors that often cluster around this issue (“competition,” “marketplace”) and Read more …

How I became a public intellectual and why you should too

By Curtis Dozier | November 11, 2013

OK, my title is a more than a little tongue in cheek. Blogging for the APA doesn’t make me a public intellectual. Nor does the one article I’ve published for a wider public, a piece on Petronius for Salon.com. But by the same token it seems to me that most professional classical scholars don't pursue publishing in such venues, and I think more of us should attempt it. There are a lot of reasons why we don't. We’re not trained to write for broad audiences, and the tenure and promotion system demands that we devote our energy to peer-reviewed publications. Most of us don't know how we would go about finding a venue (I got published on Salon by pure, naïve luck, a shot in the Read more …