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Seneca in the Renaissance

Seneca in the Renaissance

***Abstract deadline: March 6th, 2019***

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2021 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Chicago (January 7-10). For its sixth annual panel, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Seneca in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last twenty years have seen an explosion in studies of the academic and creative reception of Seneca in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including James Ker, Jill Kraye, Peter Stacey, and Emily Wilson--to name but a few--has illuminated the multiple and interconnected legacies of Seneca in literature, philosophy, political theory, and art. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Senecan reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, a generation ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Senecan texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Seneca; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Seneca. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Senecan reception provides on Renaissance philology; the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the figure of Seneca as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Senecan reception in different areas or communities; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Seneca’s Renaissance reception.

We are committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words, suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation, should be sent as an email attachment to [ariane.schwartz@gmail.com]. All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.

Proposals must be received by Friday, March 6, 2020.

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