Classics in the News

By Erik Shell | July 16, 2018

(From the Dartmouth News blog)

SCS Outreach Prize winner Roberta Stewart, founder of book discussion groups for veterans, held a workshop recently with Classicists from other states hoping to start similar programs.

"The workshop represents a pilot to test the ability to develop a national network of co-facilitators who work pro bono to run groups nationwide."

You can read the full article here: https://news.dartmouth.edu/news/2018/07/classics-professors-book-group-v...

---

(Photo: "Painted slab of tomb with 'Duel'" by Carlo Raso, public domain)

By Erik Shell | June 19, 2018

(Message sent to SCS by James McNamara)

The New Zealand Qualifications Authority is proposing to drop the scholarship exam in Latin (for final year pupils) in 2019. The exam offers students recognition and a monetary award for high achievement. It may be that this would be a precursor to dropping Latin in New Zealand schools altogether.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal in support of continuing the scholarship exam in Latin, it would be greatly appreciated if you could submit feedback to the review, which closes this Friday 22 June, NZ time.

Details of the scholarship review are here:

By Erik Shell | June 4, 2018

The Association of American Colleges & Universities and the American Association of University Professors have recently signed on to a statement condemning the multi-front attack on the Humanities and a Liberal Arts education. 

"The disciplines of the liberal arts—and the overall benefit of a liberal education--are exemplary in this regard, for they foster intellectual curiosity about questions that will never be definitively settled..."

You can read the full statement here: https://www.aacu.org/about/statements/2018/joint-statement-value-liberal...

---

(Photo: "The Death of Socrates" by Jacques-Louis David, public domain)

By Erik Shell | May 17, 2018

The SCS has learned from Anatole Mori that the Department of Ancient Mediterranean Studies Graduate Program at the University of Missouri will not be discontinued.

Here is her full statement:

By Erik Shell | May 9, 2018

Multiple proponents of Spoken Latin in the classroom - Edward Zarrow, Tom Morris, and Jason Pedicone - were recently featured on the "America the Bilingual" podcast.

"How has a presumably dead language become such a disruptor? Because Latin certainly seems to be just that. It’s one of the most frequently taught languages in American schools."

You can listen to the podcast in-browser here: http://www.americathebilingual.com/in-case-you-thought-latin-was-dead/

---

(Photo: "Audio Bokeh" by Alan Levine, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

By Erik Shell | May 4, 2018

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South recently put out a call for action concerning the proposed discontinuation of the Classics program at the University of Montana.

By Erik Shell | April 13, 2018

April, 2018

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

By Erik Shell | April 13, 2018

A new Classics program has started up at Southern Virginia University. The university now offers a Major and Minor in Classical Studies, with classes in Greek and Latin as well as history, philosophy, and the arts.

Join us in congratulating them and the expansion of our field!

---

(Photo: "Main Hall" by Carol M. Highsmith, public domain)

By Erik Shell | April 11, 2018

SCS Member Scott Johnson has received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. 

"Johnson’s Guggenheim project is a cultural biography of the language of Syriac. This will be the first book of its kind in English. It attempts to trace the origins, flourishing, and legacy of Syriac as an actor between empires in the late ancient and early medieval worlds."

You can read the full press release here.

---

Photo: "Park Avenue" by Patrick Nouhailler, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Erik Shell | March 27, 2018

After the threat of agency closure by the end of next fiscal year, congress has instead approved a $3 million dollar increase in funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

"The spending bill notes that the increases will help the NEH enhances its support for the preservation of Native languages and cultures and local history preservation initiatives, as well as fund a new program to build infrastructure and capacity for humanities organizations."

You can read the full analysis on the NEH website here.

---

Pages

Share This Page

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy