Classics in the News

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

Aquila Theatre’s Youstories & the Center for Ancient Studies at NYU Present Warstories: Ancient And Modern Narratives Of War on Tuesday, November 11th, Veteran’s Day, 2014.  The program for the event is as follows:

Metropolitan Museum of Art – 1000 5th Avenue, 11 am-12 pm
11:00 am Gallery Talk: Stories of War and Homecoming in Classical Drama and Art,

Hemmerdinger Hall, 31 Washington Place – NYU, 1 pm-9 pm
1:00 pm  - “A Presentation of Veteran Artworks,” Society of Artistic Veterans

5:30 pm – “Welcome,” Matthew S. Santirocco, Senior Vice Provost, Professor of Classics and Angelo J. Ranieri Director of Ancient Studies and Peter Meineck, Clinical Associate Professor of Classics, NYU

“Opening Address: Telling Who We Are,” Kwame Anthony Appiah, Professor of Philosophy and Law, NYU

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

Nicholas Kristof speaks up for the humanities (mainly Philosophy) in a digital age.

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

Last week the Washington Post published an article on the adoption of oral Latin programs in several local schools.  Now the same author, Frances Stead Sellers, has asked SCS members Milena Minkova and Terence Tunberg to turn famous quotes by U.S. Presidents into Latin.

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

The Washington Post has published an article about the adoption of spoken Latin programs in several D.C. schools and describes the participation by District teachers in several relevant summer programs.  SCS members Jennifer Larson and Terence Tunberg are pictured

By Information Architect | January 24, 2015

From The Clarion Ledger:

Seven University of Mississippi students recently participated in an educational trip of a lifetime, five weeks of learning in Rome and helping with an archaeological dig at a site that dates to about 600 B.C.

The multi-year excavation project is organized by the University of Michigan and the University of Calabria. Hilary Becker, Ole Miss assistant professor of classics, took the students to the Area Sacra di S. Omobono archaeological field school.

The students dug near the Roman Forum and Capitoline Hill. The excavation site was utilized as a Roman sanctuary that remained in use for more than 800 years. It was eventually transformed into Christian churches, the latest of which still stands.

By Information Architect | January 24, 2015

From http://blackamericaweb.com/

William S. Scarborough was born a slave in Georgia, but went on to become one of the nation’s leading scholars in Greek and Latin literature.

In fact, many consider Scarborough to be the first African-American classical scholar. Born in February 16, 1852, in Macon, Georgia, Scarborough’s father was a freed slave but his mother was still enslaved, thus he inherited her status. Although educating slaves was against the law, Scarborough was secretly taught how to read and write in the classical languages.

He later went on to serve as an apprentice shoemaker, and then worked as a secretary at a well-known Black association because of his studies. Scarborough attended college at Atlanta University before heading to Oberlin where he graduated with honors in 1875.

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

Derek T. Muller, a law professor at Pepperdine University, has analyzed data from the Law School Admissions Council and has concluded that "the best prospective law students read Homer." 

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

National Public Radio presents a talk by a classics teacher (among other things) with an unusual view of the subjunctive.

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/13/248195238/does-the-subjunctive-have-a-dark-side

By Information Architect | January 24, 2015

The National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) is pleased to announce today a $500,000 grant from the late Ernest L. Pellegri, one of the Foundation's donors, to the University of Maryland's Department of Classics.

Their project entitled, "Between Washington and Ancient Rome: The NIAF Pellegri Program on Roman Antiquity and Its Legacy in America," was selected to receive the NIAF Ernest Pellegri Grant to support the study of Latin, ancient Roman archeology, and ancient Roman civilization; and to offer opportunities for students to study abroad, conduct research, and pursue fellowships in the United States and Italy.

For more, go to http://www.umdrightnow.umd.edu/news/umd-study-roman-impact-american-identity.

By Information Architect | January 24, 2015

(CNN) -- Clusters of Roman skulls have been discovered deep below London's Liverpool Street by construction workers digging a new rail route through England's capital.

Tunnelers working on the Crossrail project found about 20 skulls, deep beneath the 16th century Bedlam burial ground in the center of the city, Crossrail said in a statement.

Read more: Rail excavation unearths suspected 'plague pit'

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