In Memoriam

By admin | January 24, 2015

With great sadness, the members of the Department of Classics at Grand Valley State University mourn the passing of our dear friend and colleague, Barbara Flaschenriem.

Barbara passed away on August 15, 2013, at Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan, following a long illness. Initially appointed in the Department of English in 1998, she became a founding member of the Department of Classics in 2000.

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

It is with deep regret that the Department of Classics and Mediterranean Studies at the University of Illinois Chicago announces the death of our former colleague Alexander MacGregor, retired associate professor of Classics specializing in Latin poetry. He passed away peacefully at his home in Chicago on August 8, 2013, after a brief but severe illness. He was a distinguished scholar and his love of teaching made him a gifted mentor, much admired by his students.  A memorial service will be held at 10AM, on Saturday, September 14th at St. Ignatius Church in the Rogers Park neighborhood near Loyola. The service will be followed by a gathering of friends and family in the parish hall.

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

Bill Kemeza of Boston College High School reports the death of long-time APA member Brian P. Donaher

By admin | January 24, 2015

On behalf of Ruth Scodel:

With great sadness we announce the untimely death of Kathryn Bosher, from metastatic lung cancer.  Kathryn came to Michigan from the University of Toronto in 1998 and finished her PhD in 2006.  She was an assistant professor at Northwestern and was going to start a new position at OSU in August 2013.

Kate’s great love was the theater, and the center of her scholarly work was the Greek theater in Sicily and Magna Graecia.  In 2012 she published Theatre Outside Athens:  drama in South Italy and Sicily, proceedings of a conference she organized at Northwestern.  Nobody who saw the production of Aristophanes’ Assemblywomen that she directed for the 2008 Feminism and Classics conference will forget it.

By admin | January 24, 2015

From The Baltimore Sun:

Georg H.B. Luck, whose career teaching the classics at the Johns Hopkins University spanned two decades and included studying the role magic and witchcraft played in the theology and world of the ancient Greeks and Romans, died Sunday from complications of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson.

He was 87 and a longtime resident of the city's Poplar Hill neighborhood.

By admin | January 24, 2015

Charles Luther Babcock died December 7, 2012 at the age of 88. He was born in Whittier California, May 26, 1924. After attending Whittier Union High School, he enrolled in the University of California—Berkeley in 1941, where he became a member of ROTC. In 1943 he entered the US Army and served in General Patton’s Third Army in the invasion of Germany in 1945. There, as Second Lieutenant, he earned the Bronze Medal for leading his platoon through heavy fire at Neumarkt, assisting the wounded, personally liberating nine POWs and capturing the local civilian leader of the resistance. After the war as Captain he became aide-de-camp to Maj. Gen. John Coulter, who went on to become Deputy Commander of the Fourth Army.

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

(A longer version of the following memoir, by Helen North, Centennial Professor of Classics Emerita, Swarthmore College, was commissioned for a forthcoming volume of the Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. This version was lightly edited and abridged by Ralph M. Rosen. Sadly, Professor North herself died on January, 21, 2012. Shortly before her death she had given her permission for this obituary to be abridged and published in the APA Newsletter. Special thanks to Julia Gaisser for facilitating the process, and to the American Philosophical Society for permission to print the text that follows).

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

I met Gary in 1987 when we were both starting our careers as Visiting Assistant Professors at Union College in Schenectady, New York.  He died on December 31, 2011, after a brief battle with cancer.  The facts of Gary’s life as a classicist are clear: After earning a double Ph.D. in Classics and Comparative Literature at Yale, he went on to teach at some excellent places: Union College, George Washington, Eckerd College—where he held an endowed chair—and finally, Villanova.  His numerous publications include his excellent Euripides and the Poetics of Nostalgia, published by Cambridge University Press in 2006. Gary was a conscientious, witty, and imaginative teacher, who earned the loyalty and devotion of many of his students.     

By Adam Blistein | January 24, 2015

Dirk tom Dieck Held, the Elizabeth S. Kruidenier ’48 Professor of Classics at Connecticut College in New London CT, died of a cerebral hemorrhage on March 21, 2012. He took his A.B. and Ph.D in Classics at Brown University.

Joining the faculty of Connecticut College in 1971, he held the Chair of the Classics Department for thirty-two years.  Professor Held presented and/or published over one hundred learned papers on a wide variety of topics.  He was widely known and respected for the quality of his scholarship and his dedication to the field.

Colleague Robert Proctor, Professor of Italian, remarked, “Dirk Held lived the liberal arts ideal. His scholarship was both profound and wide-ranging, from Plato’s understanding of love to Nietzsche and the reception of classical antiquity in the modern world. He was a modern exemplar of ancient Roman humanitas: culture, kindness, generosity, and wit.”

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