Public Statement from the SCS Board of Directors

The mission of the Society for Classical Studies is “to advance knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the ancient Greek and Roman world and its enduring value.” That world was a complex place, with a vast diversity of peoples, languages, religions, and cultures spread over three continents, as full of contention and difference as our world is today.  Greek and Roman culture was shared and shaped for their own purposes by people living from India to Britain and from Germany to Ethiopia. Its medieval and modern influence is wider still. Classical Studies today belongs to all of humanity.

For this reason, the Society strongly supports efforts to include all groups among those who study and teach the ancient world, and to encourage understanding of antiquity by all. It vigorously and unequivocally opposes any attempt to distort the diverse realities of the Greek and Roman world by enlisting the Classics in the service of ideologies of exclusion, whether based on race, color, national origin, gender, or any other criterion. As scholars and teachers, we condemn the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization. 

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Interiority in Roman Literature
Pacific Rim Roman Literature Seminar 32
University of Sydney, 11 to 13 July 2018
 
The thirty-second meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at the University of Sydney from 11 to 13 July 2018. The theme for the 2018 conference will be interiority in Roman literature.
 
Papers are invited to explore Roman literature’s inner voices, visions and narratives; psychologies; inner lives; the ‘inward turn’ of Roman literature at various periods, such as the first and fourth centuries; interior spaces; inner sanctums and circles of power. Roman literature is conceived of as the literature of Roman world from its earliest beginnings to the end of antiquity. The theme may be interpreted broadly, and papers on other topics will also be considered.
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:12pm by Erik Shell.

SOCRATICA IV

After the Socratica Conferences (Socratica 2005, held in Senigallia, Socratica 2008, held in Napoli, and Socratica 2012 held in Trento), and the respective proceedings published in 2008, 2010 and 2013, we are pleased to announce the SOCRATICA IV Conference to be held in Buenos Aires on November 13-16, 2018 at the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
 
We invite submissions of proposals related to any of the following areas: 
 
a) The figure and thought of Socrates
b) Socratic and anti-Socratic literature, i.e. texts and fragments of Ancient Comedy, first-generation Socratics, Polycrates, Isocrates and so on
c) Philosophy and thought of the first-generation Socratics
d) Historiographical problems related to the Socratic circle 
e) Key notions, such as sophistes and philosophos, before, during, and after Socrates time

Call for papers 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:08pm by Erik Shell.

Diversity and Uniformity in the Archaic Greek World

On 23-25 May 2018, leading scholars from around the world will gather at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire in the United States to explore diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world. All of the speakers are contributors to the forthcoming Oxford History of the Archaic Greek World (OHAGW), edited by Paul Cartledge (Cambridge University) and Paul Christesen (Dartmouth College).  OHAGW will provide detailed studies of 29 sites, sanctuaries, and regions in Greece during the Archaic period. Each essay in OHAGW will be built around the same set of eleven rubrics, so that it will be possible to read either vertically (reading a complete study of a single site) or horizontally (reading, for example, about the economic history of a number of different sites). Taken together, these studies will add unprecedented depth and subtlety to our evidence for and understanding of diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world.

The speakers at this conference will discuss how the particular site, sanctuary or region about which they are writing for OHAGW contributes to our understanding of diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world. The schedule of the conference – all sessions of which will be plenary – is such as to leave a considerable amount of time for questions, answers, and general discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:02pm by Erik Shell.
Alexander the Great and King Poros

Jacoby Online is a monumental resource encompassing several separate projects, all of them related to Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker (FGrH) of Felix Jacoby (1876–1959). The original reference work aimed to collect, edit, and comment on all the known testimonies[1] and fragments of ancient Greek historians whose works survive incomplete. At the time of his death, Jacoby had produced fifteen print volumes covering 856 historians, distributed among three of five proposed areas: (I) genealogy and mythography, (II) history (Zeitgeschichte), and (III) local history (Horographie) and ethnography. Work resumed in 1991 under a team of European scholars on two remaining areas, which were planned but never completed by Jacoby: (IV) biography and antiquarian literature (of which three out of a proposed 27 volumes have now been published in print); and (V) historical geography (a work in progress to be completed in 2019 and eventually to be published in print).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 12:00am by Matt Simonton.

Congratulations to Michele Valerie Ronnick and Ruth Scodel, who were both awarded Lifetime Achievement Awards by Eta Sigma Phi this Fall. Read more about the awardees and their achievements in Nuntius, Eta Sigma Phi's publication.  

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 12/14/2017 - 3:11pm by .
NEH Logo

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

  • Philip Sapirstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln): "The Ancient Greek Temple of Hera at Olympia: A Digital Architectural History"
  • Ryan Horne (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill): "Understanding Ancient Economic and Social Networks Based on Evidence from Aeolian Coins" 
  • Etienne Helmer (University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras): "Ancient Greek Philosophers on Economics"
  • Michele Lowrie (University of Chicago) "The Concept of Security in Ancient Roman Literature and Politics"
  • Craig Williams (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) "Orpheus Crosses the Atlantic: Native American Knowledge of Ancient Greece and Rome"
  • Susan Collins (University of Notre Dame) "Constituting the Ancient City: The Political Regime and Classical Sparta" 

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 12/14/2017 - 2:56pm by .

Ancient Greek and Roman Painting and the Digital Humanities

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 12/14/2017 - 2:14pm by .

This article was originally published on the Amphora blog on January 6, 2016.

If you’re new to academic conferences, or to the joint annual meeting of the SCS/AIA, you may be thinking that the Exhibit Hall is mostly for buying books. And if you’re at the start of your career and/or on a modest budget, you may think that there’s nothing for you in the Exhibit Hall as a result.  Au contraire!  Here’s a short list of things you can do there—completely aside from buying books—that can be beneficial to your career, fun, interesting, worthwhile, and generally good things to do. The Exhibit Hall is generally open about nine hours a day for the two full days of the conference, plus a half day on either side, so there’s plenty of time to try these in small bits.  As a press exhibitor myself (full disclosure) I spend many hours in the hall, so I have a chance to see the variety of exhibitors who transport their materials or goods or information to the conference, often from international origins, in hopes they’ll have an opportunity to talk with you.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/11/2017 - 12:00am by Ellen Bauerle.

Boston University Graduate Student Conference

Identity Under Empire: Defining the Self under the Cultural Hegemony of the Athenian, Macedonian, and Roman Empires

Date of Conference: March 17, 2018

Keynote Speaker
Steven Smith
Hofstra University

The Department of Classical Studies at Boston University is excited to accept papers for its 10th annual Graduate Studies Conference. This year, the conference will examine the question of regional, national, personal, artistic, religious, and ethnic identity under the Athenian and Roman Empires as well as the empires of Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the subsequent Hellenistic Kingdoms. The cultural and political influence of any ancient empire has a far-reaching effect on the populace not only of founding city-states, but also that of the extending territories within its dominion. This conference intends to explore how ancient peoples – citizens and non-citizens, male and female alike – negotiated the multifarious problem of identity within the complexity of a unified yet multicultural empire. We enthusiastically welcome submissions from any and all fields of the humanities covering material, textual, or other sources.

Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 12/07/2017 - 1:21pm by .

The University of Texas at Austin

Joint Classics Philosophy Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy

Gregory Vlastos Archive: Research Possibilities 2017-2018

The large collection of papers from the Nachlass of Gregory Vlastos (1907-1991) is available for study at The University of Texas at Austin, in its Harry Ransom Center—one of the world's major and renowned repositories of manuscripts, rare books, and other materials in the fine arts and the humanities. The Vlastos Archive comprises published and unpublished studies, lecture notes for classes, research notes, books and offprints with annotations, and extensive files of correspondence. Under the auspices of the Joint Classics-Philosophy Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy at UT Austin, a fund has been established for awards for travel expenses to scholars who are interested in conducting research at the Vlastos Archive.  Applications for these awards may be submitted at any time, provided the yearly allowance of funds has not been exhausted. Interested scholars should contact the Director of the Joint Program, Professor Matthew L. Evans, The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Philosophy, 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3500, Austin, TX 78712, or via e-mail, evansmatt@utexas.edu

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 12/07/2017 - 1:09pm by .

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Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed

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