Skip to main content

Blog: Creating a Coalition to Empower Classicists of Color

By Samuel Flores | June 19, 2020

In 2018, a group of scholars founded Mountaintop Coalition, an SCS-affiliated group with a shared interest in advancing the professional goals of Classicists who identify as members of ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in the field. Mountaintop’s activities focus on practical issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and access in professional settings. Shortly after its official launch and activities at the 2019 annual joint meeting of AIA-SCS, a group of students at Bryn Mawr College founded Read more …

Blog: Classics and Pop Music: Classical Allusions and Literary Techniques in the Music of Jay-Z

By Samuel Flores | May 16, 2019

At a 2010 forum at the New York Public Library featuring Harvard professor Cornel West and Jay-Z (Shawn Carter), Prof. West recalled one of his seminars at Princeton, which had featured a panel of Jay-Z, Toni Morrison, and Phylicia Rashad. West recalled discussing how Plato “made the world safe for Socrates, so the people would remember the name of Socrates forever,” and Jay-Z Read more …

Header Image: Roman slave shackle found at Headbourne Worthy, Hampshire (Image via Wikimedia and taken by PortableAntiquities under a CC-BY-2.0).

Blog: Teaching Ancient Slavery in the South

By Samuel Flores | November 23, 2018

What is it like to teach a course in ancient slavery within a region where the reminders of antebellum American slavery still loom so large? Understanding servitude through the lens of slave systems in the ancient Mediterranean can challenge students to think about Greece and Rome in a less romantic light—and to recognize how they influenced American history too. 

My course in ancient slavery came about three years ago, while I was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics at Kalamazoo College in Michigan. My colleagues asked me if I would be interested in teaching a special topics course on slavery in Greece and Rome. My previous experience in this topic was limited, but I was excited to take this opportunity to explore it.

Read more …