2021 SCS Award for Excellence in Teaching Classics at the College and University Level: Award Citations

Congratulations to our 2021 award winners again! You can view the full award citations by clicking on the links below:

Deborah Beck

Richard Ellis

Wilfred Major

Brett Rogers 


Deborah Beck, Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin

The sound of a recorder introduces a student created podcast, Sophocles’ Antigone, in 2019. The host deftly introduces herself, credits the composer and musician, and then goes on to recap what has already happened in the Sophocles’ tragedy. The host gracefully alternates between delivering the Greek and a running translation and interpretation. Along the way, she references Bertolt Brecht’s 1948 Nazi-inspired Creon, reflects on her initial reading of Creon’s speech as “Teacher of the Day,” and offers a new more complex and nuanced reading of the speech.

This podcast project is just one example of Professor Deborah Beck’s creativity in designing engaging assignments with authentic audiences and issues. As part of the same course, each student is assigned to lead the class as “Teacher of the Day,” in which they choose what to focus on, lead the class in translating the text, and devise discussion questions and classroom activities. Her Classical Mythology course focuses on ethics and leadership, and she uses discussion boards, iClickers, and response papers to ask students to apply the ethics concepts from class to a modern or personal problem.

The podcast project also reveals her care in constructing each assignment so that students have a clear framework and model how to produce an elegant podcast. Her syllabus for upper-level Greek also organizes a series of papers—a close reading of a passage, a response to a scholarly article—that prepare her students to produce a final research paper.

Besides the creativity, engagement, and scaffolding that are so evident in her syllabi and in student comments, Professor Beck is known for her “laser focus on self-reflection in her teaching.” When a colleague was asked to teach the graduate level Greek survey for the first time, Professor Beck not only shared her syllabus, assignments, glossed passages, and in-class activities, but she also shared the notes she had left for herself how to revise each aspect of the course the next time she taught it. Similarly, she asks students to give feedback to the professor and to articulate goals for themselves. And after her grad students have presented a scholarly article to the class, she asks them “what can you learn from this for your own work?”

Finally, it is clear that Professor Beck cares about the big picture, how to be comfortable with shades of gray, how to have dialogue with those whose opinions differ from yours, how to change your mind in light of new information, and how to admit you are wrong without being defensive. Her August op-ed in the Austin American-Statesman reminds us that we may experience a “rush of feelings” as we return to school during a pandemic and the importance of relying on each other to understand the material we are studying together. One student comment sums up Professor Beck’s impact: “I appreciate the space you’ve created for discussions but also the manner that you place your reasoning and [show your] understanding for everyone’s point of view, and really what it means to be human.

We are honored to recognize Deborah Beck for her outstanding teaching with the SCS’s 2021 Award for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College and University Level.

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Richard Ellis, Continuing Lecturer at the University of California at Los Angeles

What sets Richard Ellis apart is his ability to care for his students, whether first generation or students of color, and to recruit students into Classics – not just as a major or minor, but as a way to enhance and integrate into other fields the student cares about. Professor Ellis connects with his students through comparative material, such as Walcott’s Omeros or The Warriors (1979) (paired with the Anabasis). He reaches out to his students. He will prepare his classroom with images of athletes on the walls for the first day of “Ancient Athletics”, throw a pizza party for a Xenophon class, take students to a Greek play, or meet for a weekly Sunday “Zoom brunch” during lockdown. When he knew that lockdown alienation was keenly felt, he designed collaborative assignments that required students to meet online. He is the kind of person who remembers every student’s sports team. One alumna, a first-generation college student, remembers his unstinting support: “People judge me based on looks, and when I speak Spanish, they automatically assume that I was not ‘good enough’ to be a student at UCLA. Professor Ellis helped me squash that fear of mine because he believed in me…He told me that I have no reason to be afraid of failure because I am successful. It is rare for a professor to make an effort to get to know their students and ensure that they are thriving.”

Professor Ellis works hard to help his students thrive. He is known for his engaging classes. His lectures have been described as “transfixing, hypnotic, and captivating”. One student remembers “his courses [made] me feel like I was 12 years old again, pouring over a family tree of the Greek gods and wishing I could sink fully into that world. All of a sudden, Greek was not an incomprehensible wall that barred that world, but an opening.” One of Professor Ellis’s many innovative assignments asks to write a Pindaric ode to a modern athlete: “hymn their victories and triumphs over fate with poetic grandeur! But don’t invite phthonos!” Students receive a list of Pindaric elements to mimic, from personification to “gnomic, proverbial statements about the nature of existence” and even a modest sample ode composed by Professor Ellis himself, in honor of David Beckham (“curler of balls, feigner of injuries…never was your hair out of place. May the withering/nemesis of the boastful, Alopecia, stay far away”). Not only was this assignment fun and engaging, it also had a high impact on student learning, as he notes: “Their creative ventriloquizing of Pindar played as important a part in preparing the sophistication of their final papers.” It is no surprise that students frequently comment that his classes drew them towards Classics.

We are honored to recognize Richard Ellis for his outstanding teaching with the SCS’s 2021 Award for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College and University Level.

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Wilfred Major, Associate Professor at Louisiana State University

Three simple goals define Professor Wilfred Major’s teaching and pedagogy: digital materials, accessibility, a willingness not just to tinker with his courses, but a full-throated openness to revision to expand the canon to the entire history of the Greek speaking world. Professor Major engages students where they are at, including texts that appeal to the entire range of human experience, giving them space to articulate their ideas, and regularly asking them to tackle research topics that have not been covered in the course. Two pedagogical projects are especially noteworthy, each inspired by a simple question.

The first question was by a student: “What happened to the Greeks? Did they become extinct?” We may laugh at such a question, or cry, but our profession frequently discontinues the story of Greek history and culture after the rise of Alexander, or at best with the Second Sophistic. Professor Major decided to take this student’s question seriously and rebuilt his Greek Civilization course in a brilliant and daring fashion. He extended the chronological parameters of the course into late antiquity and the Byzantine world to the Ottoman empire and independence. He expanded the topics covered to include texts that would appeal to doctors, engineers, filmmakers, scientists, and theologians. By opening up the chronological and generic parameters of the course, he reaches students with many varied interests and majors. As a result, his Greek Civ course surpasses Classical Mythology in enrollment.

The second question we have all heard, “Why is Greek so hard?” In response to this question, Professor Major has written an online Open Educational Resource, Ancient Greek for Everyone, that introduces Greek for a 21st century audience and makes it affordable and accessible for everyone. Beginning with the most frequently encountered vocabulary and grammar (e.g., -mi verbs and 3rd declension nouns), he has crafted an online textbook with an easy-to-read format, lucid explanations, illustrative examples, straightforward exercises, and readings from classical and biblical texts, with plans to add readings from other eras and genres as well. He has published a series of articles outlining the pedagogical principles of his approach to beginning Greek. And he has organized countless workshops at both national and regional classics conferences, opening up the conversation for many others to consider new ways to teach Greek.

 Professor Major’s students regularly praise his openness to listen to their ideas, his commitment to ask “impossible questions” (questions that have no answer), his skill at prompting small group discussion to let students to work out their position prior to full class discussion, and his willingness to guide student research on an immense range of topics—from the divine liturgy of John Chrysostom and Aristotle’s Categories and Prior Analytics to military manuals and Dante’s idea of allegory. As one student explains, “Dr. Major’s personality is open and lively which contributes to the fun and [the] relaxed classroom environment, but the biggest factor is his respect and empathy for students.”

We are honored to recognize Wilfred Major for his outstanding teaching with the SCS’s 2021 Award for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College and University Level.

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Brett Rogers, Professor at the University of Puget Sound

Brett Rogers believes that Plato’s Academy sought to accomplish something fundamental that we still value in the university today: to help students cultivate the critical tools for becoming responsible members of their community. His style of teaching encourages students not to opt out of the world, but to live more intensely in it, as he challenges them to become a better version of themselves. He actively seeks out relevant personal experiences, knowledge from other disciplines, and connections to students’ daily lives. Students remark on his masterly discussion leading. “He often pushed discussions,” notes an alumnus, “to more meaningful places with succinct Socratic questions, involved students by connecting the current topic to their own major and asked us to consider how the ancient text might apply to contemporary concerns”. Professor Rogers provides a safe space to discuss complex and challenging issues, treating sensitive topics with care and concern, and showing, as another student writes, that he “cared about our mental and emotional needs as students.”

One of Professor Rogers’ high impact techniques is to ask students to imagine themselves back in antiquity and think about course themes like “freedom,” timê, kleos or parrhesia. The essay prompts for his first-year seminar “Athens: Freedom and the Liberal Arts” include taking the role of a fictional Athenian woman and responding to Pericles’ exhortation to women in Thucydides 2.45 or reflecting on whether Plato’s Republic could be both free and just. Students role play as they perform their own Dionysia as a class, act out books 9-12 of the Odyssey, or create their own version of a Greek tragedy. Many comment on the two weeks they spend playing “Athens in 403,” a Reacting to the Past game. One writes about what he noticed as a writing advisor in the university writing center: “I watched [his students] write and deliver speeches, conspire with each other to effect in-game political change, and think critically about the role and power of rhetoric”. Another notes simply, “I learned how to write at the college level” from Professor Rogers.

Professor Rogers is dedicated to his students. At the start of his courses, he makes it clear that he will work as hard as he asks them to, and students notice. “The more energy you put into class the more energy he puts into you.” “Never have I met a professor more invested in student growth!” “He was intentional about connecting me to resources, validating my experiences as a first-generation student, and encouraging me to pursue my own research interests”. These efforts extend far beyond the classroom. Professor Rogers has directed several dozen senior theses and half a dozen summer projects, led a study abroad trip to Greece (described by a student as “one of the most impactful and challenging experiences of my time as an undergrad”) and served as advisor for board game clubs and role-playing clubs focused on Classical Reception. And everything is done with good humor, including his famous “fun outfits” on Fridays.

We are honored to recognize Brett Rogers or his outstanding teaching with the SCS’s 2021 Award for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College and University Level.

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To submit to the SCS program committee, see the following link and deadlines:

The program submission system is now open: https://program.classicalstudies.org/

You must be a current SCS member to log into the system. To renew you membership or check your membership status, check our membership site.

The deadlines for submitting proposals and abstracts via the program submission system are:

  • Monday, April 25th, 2022 at 11.59pm EDT:

Panel, committee panel, workshop, seminar, and roundtable proposals.

Affiliated group reports, and already approved organizer-refereed reports.

New charter applications for affiliated groups, charter renewals for affiliated groups, and new organizer-refereed panel proposals for the 2024 meeting.

  • Monday, May 2nd, 2022 at 11.59pm EDT: 

Individual abstracts and lightning talk abstracts.

Committees, Affiliated Groups, and Organizer-refereeed Panels

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 04/05/2022 - 11:51am by Helen Cullyer.

The Classical Association of New England (CANE) invites you to this year's CANE Summer Institute, “Maiores a(n)d Posteriores: Imagining ‘classical antiquity’ into the future” on July 11-16, 2022. For the past several decades, CANE has offered a week-long program of mini-courses, professional development workshops, reading groups, and public lectures.

This summer, access to the institute will be offered in two formats: in person at Brown University (room and board options available) and online via CANE Zoom. Participants choose one format when registering. The mini-courses will be offered separately for in-person and online participants; workshops and reading groups will accommodate participants in both formats; public lectures will be in-person and live-streamed simultaneously. For information about this year’s offerings, including descriptions of our mini-courses, professional development workshops, reading groups, and public lectures, please visit www.caneweb.org/csi to link to the full program information and online registration option.

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Mon, 04/04/2022 - 11:22am by .

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.

AMPRAW 2022 will be held at Yale University from Thursday 3rd November to Saturday 5th November 2022, with the generous support of the Department of Classics at Yale University, the ARCHAIA program, and the Whitney Humanities Centre.

We anticipate holding this conference in a hybrid format. We hope that participants will be able to join us in person in New Haven, but will also allow remote access for both speakers and audience members.

This year’s theme is “Islands”. Possible topics may include, but need not be limited to, the following:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 3:44pm by .
Penn Public Lectures - Co-Creating Antiquities

Co-Creating Antiquities

New Futures for the Greek and Roman Past

Featuring: Joy Connolly (President of the American Council of Learned Societies)

The Penn Public Lectures on Classical Antiquity and the Contemporary World aim to advance understanding of the many ways the past is put to use in building the present. They will be delivered by visionary scholars of ancient Greece and Rome, who will reimagine the role those ancient cultures have played over time in the building of later cultural forms, including the discipline of Classical Studies itself.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 1:24pm by .

Arheologia is a research journal of the Institute of Archaeology, the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine discussing problems of archaeology. The journal presents articles on ancient history and archaeology from prehistory till the Early Modern period, publications of new materials and research results regarding the sites situated on the territory of Ukraine and beyond, biographic materials, reviews and chronicles. The journal’s audience are historians, local lore researchers, teachers, students of historical departments, general public interested in the ancient history of Ukraine.

Arheologia is asking for direct support in the form of scholarship. The executive editor, Dr. Tetiania Shevchenko, has put out a call requesting non-Ukrainian submissions to the journal. The journal is open access (no publication fees) and accepts submissions in English. There's already a range of Classics relevant articles published in the journal, so additional relevant research in Classics is welcome.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 11:20am by .
Books

New Directions in the Study of Women in the Greco-Roman World

Book Launch to Celebrate the Book and its dedicatee, Sarah B. Pomeroy

When: Monday, April 4, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EDT

Where: Zoom (email Ronnie Ancona for information: rancona@hunter.cuny.edu)

Sarah Pomeroy’s groundbreaking Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves introduced scholars, students, and general readers to an exciting new area of inquiry: women in classical antiquity. Almost fifty years later, New Directions in the Study of Women in the Greco-Roman World builds upon and moves beyond Pomeroy’s seminal work to represent the next step in this interdisciplinary field.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 10:41am by .

(posted on behalf of Jakub Pigoń with details from Ukrainian Wikipedia entry)

Oleksandr Kyslyuk, a historian and classicist, was born in 1962. He graduated from Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv and was active as a language teacher (including ancient Greek) and, in particular, as a translator from Greek, Latin and other languages at the Kyiv Theological Academy and Seminary of the UOC-KP (1993-2005). Most recently, he was a senior lecturer at the Department of Theory and History of State and Law of the Institute of Political Science and Law of the National Pedagogical University MP Dragomanova, where he conducted classes in Latin and Roman law. Aristotle's Politics, Xenophon's Anabasis and a treatise by Thomas of Aquinas were among the works he rendered into Ukrainian. He died on March 5, 2022 in Bucha near Kyiv.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 03/29/2022 - 1:16pm by .
University of British Columbia - AMNE department

The Department of Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies celebrates its new identity

Questioning and building upon what has come before

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 03/29/2022 - 10:14am by .
Roman Forum

This course in Italy will focus on creating antiracist curricula in the Latin classroom and will take place from July 18th - July 29th in Rome and the Bay of Naples. The course includes visits to many of the major sites in Rome and the Bay of Naples in afternoons or on full-day excursions. The Vergilian Society has scholarships available and the deadline to apply has been extended to April 11th. These scholarships often cover the entire tour apart from the flight.

This tour is intended as a collaborative experience where extensive resources will be shared, everyone's voice is welcome, and participants work as a group to envision a better model for the field at the PK-12 level.

More details can be found here: https://www.vergiliansociety.org/diversifying-the-latin.../

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Thu, 03/24/2022 - 11:33am by Helen Cullyer.
Fortunatae Journal Cover in yellow

Fortunatae, Revista Canaria de Filología, Cultura y Humanidades Clásicas, is edited by the Classical Studies Section of the Classical, French, Arabic and Romance Philology Department at Universidad de La Laguna (Tenerife, Spain).

Since its origins in 1991, the Journal publishes original, new research papers, notes and reviews, written by National and International contributors. Its scope is ample, focusing on diverse literary manifestations, new perspectives, subjects and theories originated in the field of classical studies and its continuity in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Past issues of Fortunatae edited up to date show a periodical and prestigious publishing line, not only by the quality and originality of some of its contributions, but also by the bibliographical repertoire followed in the field of research to which it pertains. Published twice-a-year since 2019, Fortunatae accepts papers, being June and December the publication dates respectively.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 03/24/2022 - 8:21am by Helen Cullyer.

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