Access to Digital Resources During COVID-19: Loeb, Journals, and More

Please see the following on access to digital resources during COVID-19:

1. The digital Classical Loeb Library recently announced that it is making its subscription free to all schools and universities affected by COVID-19 until June 30, 2020. Librarians should email loebclassics_sales@harvard.edu for more details. In addition, SCS members can access the library for free until June 30, 2020 via the For Members Only page of our website. Log on to https://classicalstudies.org and access the For Members only page via our Membership menu. 

2. Johns Hopkins University Press and a number of publishers that contribute content to Project Muse are making books and journals freely accessible for several months. JHUP journals include AJP, TAPA, and CW. 

3. JSTOR has created a page advising how to get access to JSTOR off-campus: https://support.jstor.org/hc/en-us/articles/360044989233-About-JSTOR-Access-during-Coronavirus-COVID-19-

JSTOR and ARTstor are also making more content available to schools, colleges, universities, and public libraries. Contact your library staff to see exactly what is available to you.

4. Libraries which subscribe to ProQuest's Ebook Central will find that ebooks from 75 publishers are now available to all library patrons remotely. 

5. Oxford University Press is offering a number of free resources: https://pages.oup.com/he/us/covidresourcepage

This includes free access to OUP higher education titles via Vitalsource and Redshelf for students on COVID-19 affected campuses.

6. You can now download GreekKeys software for free from the SCS website: https://classicalstudies.org/publications-and-research/about-greekkeys-2015

7. Eidolon is providing free custom course packs and special content

8. Cambridge University Press is making a number of resources freely available though is experiencing technical issues with textbooks.

9. For resources that are permanently open access, see the Ancient World Online

10. The Internet Archive provides a large collection of open access books: https://openlibrary.org/subjects/ancient_civilization

11. Sarah Bond has authored an excellent article on crowdsourced digital transcription projects on the SCS blog: https://classicalstudies.org/node/34461

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For several weeks in August and September, the United States government considered whether or not to bomb Syria. Public support for bombing hovered around ten percent, but the nation’s leaders seemed open to proceeding with military action. Various reasons were offered – to prevent further deaths from gas attacks by Syrian government forces; to degrade the Assad regime’s capacity to launch such attacks; to enforce international laws banning chemical weapons; to honor President Obama’s “red line” ultimatum of some months earlier; and to show rogue regimes and the world that the United States meant business when it made threats. An addendum to the last argument was that inaction would embolden the likes of Iran or North Korea. This line of thought got me thinking of a course I teach at Penn State, and the “logic of empire.”

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 11/05/2013 - 10:56am by Garrett Fagan.

Here in Europe, one of the expectations that come with a university position is that one will apply for big-money research grants. This is both a blessing and a curse. It’s a blessing because there genuinely is extra money on offer: if you want to run a complex collaborative project with postdoctoral researchers and extra PhD students, you can. It’s a curse because universities, which are (traditionally) almost all publicly funded and minimally endowed, are increasingly reliant on that extra income to keep afloat. As a result, there is pressure on the professors to bring in research money, sometimes against their own better judgment. At best, it’s a virtuous circle: the academic wants to do the research, and the grant enables it. At worst, the tail of the research grant wags the academic dog: the professor designs the application just to satisfy the university’s demand for income-generation, and ends up either rejected or (worse) running a project ineptly and unhappily.

Overall, though, I do think it is a good thing: it does mean that there are rich opportunities for collaboration between individuals, disciplines and institutions. I like to think of myself, however naively, as one of those classicists who can flourish in the new world order. I like working with other people and other universities, I like the energy, inventiveness and drive of early-career researchers, and I’m not too troubled by the organizational side of things.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/04/2013 - 9:09pm by Tim Whitmarsh.

We are launching a new feature on our website, "Guest Blogs," and we invite you to check it out and see what you think. Our field is amazingly varied, and there are new developments on the move in all parts of that variety, so that it seemed a good idea to have a forum where members can be kept up to date, informed, and--ideally-entertained in the process. We have invited a dozen Classicists to contribute regular columns (to keep an archaic print term that seems to have survived into the new medium).  We have tried to cover as much of the range of our subject as we can, and a geographical span as well, to capture at least some of the range of perspectives and expertises under the umbrella of our organization.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/04/2013 - 3:10pm by Adam Blistein.

We are posting a call for signatures to a petition launched by our colleagues in France, and circulated by John Bulwer of Euroclassica.  We thought this was an important petition to draw to your attention, and we urge members to read the message and to consider signing the petition.

Denis Feeney

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 11/03/2013 - 1:47pm by Adam Blistein.

If you are a teacher at the pre-collegiate level and have student loans, please read carefully through everything at the following link. You may be eligible for forgiveness and/or cancellation.

http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/charts/teacher

Ronnie Ancona

APA VP for Education

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/30/2013 - 10:03pm by Ronnie Ancona.

From the iTunes App Store:

Use one app to look up any Greek or Latin word: Logeion was developed at the University of Chicago to provide simultaneous lookup of entries in the many reference works that make up the Perseus Classical collection. Most reference works represented in this app are based on digitized texts from the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University.

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon (1940)
  • Liddell and Scott's Intermediate Greek Lexicon (1889)
  • Autenrieth's Homeric Dictionary
  • Slater's Lexicon to Pindar (1969)
  • Lewis's Elementary Latin Dictionary (1890)
  • Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities
  • Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites
  • Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography
  • Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities
  • Perseus Encyclopedia

The app draws data from the following Greek and Latin textbooks.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sat, 10/26/2013 - 10:08am by .

In recognition of Open Access Week, the "Profhacker" blog at The Chronicle for Higher Education has posted an instructional video about open access. Although it deals exclusively with open access as it applies to research in the sciences, it is relevant for scholars in the humanities, too.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Thu, 10/24/2013 - 9:39am by .

California Classical Studies is pleased to announce as No. 2 in its series the publication of a digital edition of Edward Courtney, A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal, a reprint with corrections of the edition of 1980. The 555-page book may be read in page view at the open-access eScholarship repository operated by the California Digital Library of the University of California. It is also available as a Print on Demand paperback ($49.95) or in ePub format ($29.95). After an embargo period of 2 years, the open-access site will provide a free download of the full print-quality PDF.

Open-access page for A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal:

http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4jh846pn

Site for purchase of POD paperback or ePub version of California Classical Studies books:

http://escholarship-california_classical_studies.lulu.com/spotlight/

Information for potential contributors to the series:

http://calclassicalstudies.org/?page_id=42

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 10/21/2013 - 9:48pm by .

(CNN) -- Clusters of Roman skulls have been discovered deep below London's Liverpool Street by construction workers digging a new rail route through England's capital.

Tunnelers working on the Crossrail project found about 20 skulls, deep beneath the 16th century Bedlam burial ground in the center of the city, Crossrail said in a statement.

Read more: Rail excavation unearths suspected 'plague pit'

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:51am by Information Architect.

Sorbonne, Paris 13th and 14th February 2014

We have now placed the program and the abstracts for the final session of our series on
Roman Declamation - Calpurnius Flaccus - on the conference website.

https://sites.google.com/site/readingromandeclamation/2014-session

The event will take place 13th and 14th February 2014 in the Sorbonne's Maison de la
Recherche, 28 Rue Serpente, 75006 Paris (map on the website).

Speakers:
Michael Winterbottom (Oxford)
Christopher van den Berg (Amherst)
Catherine Schneider (Strasbourg)
Lydia Spielberg (University of Pennsylvania)
Biagio Santorelli (Pisa)
Alessandra Rolle (Lausanne)
Julien Pingoud (Lausanne)
Jonathan Mannering (Loyola, Chicago)
Alfredo Casamento (Palermo)
Lauren Cadwell (Wesleyan University)
Andrea Balbo (Turin)

Chairs:
Jean Michel David (Pantheon-Sorbonne)
Sylvie Franchet d'Esperey (Sorbonne)
Danielle van Mal Mader (Lausanne)

Organisers:
Martin Dinter (KCL/FAPESP-USP)
Charles Guerin (Montpellier and Institut universitaire de France)
Marcos Martinho (University of Sao Paulo)
Sebastien Morlet (Paris IV - Sorbonne)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:19am by .

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