Annual Meeting Submission Deadlines Approaching

The deadline for submitting:

  • All proposals for panels, workshops, seminars, and roundtable discussions.
  • Reports from organizers of committee, organizer-refereed, and affiliated group panels who have issued their own CFPs.
  • Proposals for organizer-refereed panels for 2020.
  • Applications for new affiliated group charters and for renewals of current charters.

is April 9th, one month from today. Individual abstracts are due April 25th.

Anyone hoping to submit an abstract or another proposal can do so on our program submission website.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Map of Atlantis by Athanasius Kircher, Mundus subterraneus, vol. 1. (Amsterdam 1678) (Image in the Public Domain via Wikimedia).

A recent surge of critical focus on pseudoscience and classics focused on issues from Hippocrates and scientific racism to the racial bias of Ancient Aliens sees scholars doing the work to convince our field that classicists, historians, and archaeologists ought to take action to address the dissemination of pseudoscientific views in popular media.[1] Yet once we’ve accepted that we should confront pseudoscience in classics and archaeology, we find ourselves confronted with a rather different question: how can we best teach this in our classrooms?

When I was assigned as a teaching assistant for Intro to Greek Art and Archaeology last winter, I admit my first feeling was of slight trepidation: outside one requisite archaeology course for my bachelor’s degree, my classical training had skewed heavily toward philology and literary analysis.[2] How could I hope to leave a lasting impression on fifty students, with material I hadn’t “officially” studied in a course since my own freshman year, with only one fifty-minute discussion section per week?

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 5:09pm by Ana Maria Guay.

Reframing Wisdom Literature: Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts 

Postgraduate Conference
Department of Classics, King’s College London, 30th-31st May 2019 
 
Keynote speaker: Prof. Dimitri Gutas, Yale University 
Organisers: Sara De Martin and Anna Lucia Furlan

Introduction 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 11:44am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

December, 2018

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Suzanne Obdrzalek (Claremont McKenna College) - "Plato's Philosophy of Mind: Soul, Body and Forms in Plato's Oeuvre"
  • William Seales (University of Kentucky Research Foundation) - "Reading the Invisible Library: Rescuing the Hidden Texts of Herculaneum
    Project Description: The continued development of computerized techniques to recover writings from the Herculaneum library, the entire collections of which were destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 BCE
  • Thomas Keeline (Washington University in St. Louis) - "Latin Textual Scholarship in the Digital Age: An Open-Access Critical Edition of Ovid's Ibis and its Scholia"
  • Rachana Kamtekar (Cornell University) - "Human Agency and Cause from Aristotle to Alexander"
  • Katharina Volk (Columbia University) - "The Politics of Knowledge in Late Republican Rome"
  • Paul Iverson (Case Western Reserve University) - "The 2,000-Year-Old Calculator Known as the Antikythera Mechanism and Ancient Greek Calendars"

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 11:37am by Erik Shell.

NACGLE 2020


The 3rd North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

“Inscriptions and the Epigraphic Habit”

January 5-7, 2020
Washington DC

Call for papers:

The third North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy will be held January 5-7, 2020, in Washington, D.C., under the aegis of the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (ASGLE), and with support from Georgetown University.

The congress will be held immediately following the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Society for Classical Studies in Washington DC (January 2-5, 2020), and will include thematic panels on a variety of topics, a poster session, and possible excursions. We invite papers that present epigraphy related to the ancient world from the archaic period through late antiquity.

The congress organizing committee is pleased to invite individual abstracts for the parallel sessions (for papers of 20 minutes) and for the poster session.

Panels may be devoted some of the following themes:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 11:14am by Erik Shell.

BRITAIN'S EARLY PHILOSOPHERS (Durham, April 1-2, 2019)

The Durham Centre for Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (http://dcamp.uk) is hosting a two-day workshop on Britain's Early Philosophers and is seeking abstracts for contributed talks on any aspect of philosophy and philosophers born in or living in Britain before 1000.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 9:54am by Erik Shell.
San Diego

The local guide to San Diego is now available!  Many thanks to our local arrangements committee.

As a reminder, December 14 is the deadline to sign up for our Career Networking session and to make a hotel reservation at our group rate. 

See our 2019 Annual Meeting page for details.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 12/12/2018 - 9:53am by Helen Cullyer.

XenoiHospitality and Xenophobia in the Graeco Roman World

12th Annual Graduate Student Conference
March 15, 2019
The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Keynote Speaker: Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Denison University

The PhD/MA Program in Classics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York invites graduate students in Classics or related fields to submit abstracts for papers that explore the topics of hospitality and xenophobia in the Graeco-Roman world.

Hospitality is commonly recognized as an important value in the ancient Greek world. Xenia - or guest friendship - was a political and religious institution as well as an instrument of diplomatic relations. Through practices of supplications, strangers and foreigners demanded to be received in aristocratic houses or in whole cities. On the other hand, there is an emerging debate about the existence of xenophobia and ethnocentrism in the ancient world, from the distinction between Greeks and barbarians to the Roman treatment of enemies and slaves.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/11/2018 - 3:20pm by Erik Shell.
150th Logo

As part of the organization's Sesquicentennial celebrations, SCS has developed a short history of its book publications. You can read that history here and download a full list of books published by SCS, formerly the American Philological Association.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Mon, 12/10/2018 - 11:35am by Helen Cullyer.

TEACHING ROME AT HOME

May 2-4, 2019, College Park, Maryland

The Department of Classics at the University of Maryland, College Park, invites proposals from university and K-12 teachers and graduate students for papers and workshops on the ways in which Latin and ancient Roman civilization are now being taught to and connected with a contemporary American audience, with special emphasis on issues of contemporary urgency such as the legacies of gender and social inequality and of slavery. 

The "Classics" were etymologically and institutionally synonymous with attending "class" in the United States from the colonial period up until the end of the nineteenth century.  Americans studied Roman history and literature in school and thus Rome seemed already to be their “home,” especially since the Romans deposed kings who once ruled them just as revolutionary Americans set out to do with the British King. Over its second century, however, America gradually confronted its idealization of a Roman past and began to explore, in discussions of women's rights, of sexual identity, of multiculturalism, and of the fall of Rome, the ways in which the realities of antiquity might speak to us.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/10/2018 - 9:47am by Erik Shell.







Prof. Laura Gawlinski takes a look at the newly renovated Epigraphic Museum in Athens and notes the ways in which museums are working to make their holdings more accessible for students, teachers, and the public. 


Renovated Room 11. Molly Richardson (ASCSA/ SEG) introduces the EM to members of the Regular Program of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 

Many readers of the SCS blog have had the pleasure of carrying out research at the Epigraphic Museum in Athens. If you haven’t visited in a while, it is well worth stopping by to see the results of the recent renovations of its two main exhibition rooms, celebrated in a grand opening ceremony on May 25, 2017. 

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/10/2018 - 7:27am by Laura Gawlinski.

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