Call for Monographs: Book Series on East‐West Cultural Encounters in Literature & Cultural Studies

This Series seeks scholarly works  on  intercultural encounters in literature,  particularly  East‐West precolonial, colonial, or postcolonial contacts that expose, problematize, or re‐create the sense of locality, historicity, and subjectivity. The Series especially welcomes monographs written in English or other languages translated into English. Conference volumes or edited volumes by multiple authors will not be considered at this time. Volumes of essays with a thematic focus written by a single author, however, are welcome. We also encourage the submission of revised doctoral dissertations which employ innovative concepts related to our topics. Suggested topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Colonial literature in the countries of the Asian Pacific Rim
  • Transpacific or transatlantic cultural or literary routes/roots
  • New cultural identities in literature in neocolonial and global Asia
  • The relationship between Asia and Oceania
  • The contacts between Asia and Europe or the Americas
  • Theoretical paradigms of globality and worlding
  • Convergences and divergences of exile, diaspora, and expatriation
  • Asian diasporic writing in the new millennium
  • Canons and genres
  • Classics in modern contexts
  • Cultural translations of Sinophone, Anglophone, Francophone and/or Hispanophone literatures

National Taiwan University is striving for more international collaborations and scholarly exchanges. NTU Press, playing an important role in disseminating top‐notch research and scholarship in the Chinese‐speaking academy, is now expanding its scope of publication in English. All submissions will be assessed by the Editors and reviewed by anonymous readers. Once the book project is approved, the author(s) will receive a contract from NTU Press. Please send a book prospectus, the author’s CV, and a sample chapter to the Editors. The manuscript should employ the MLA format and style, and only a completed manuscript will be considered.

Series Editors

Dr. Bennett Yu‐Hsiang Fu (bennettfu@ntu.edu.tw)
Dr. Chi‐She Li (jisheli@ntu.edu.tw)

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This Thursday's poem at 3 Quarks Daily is full of puns with a classical theme:

The Agamemnon Rag

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

Read Mary Beard's review of two new books on Hannibal at The Times Literary Supplement.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:09pm by Information Architect.

"Eric Dugdale, associate professor of classics at Gustavus Adolphus College, received the 2011 Faculty Scholarly Achievement Award on May 7 at the College’s Honors Day Convocation." Read more at the Gustavus Adolphus Blog.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 12:57am by .

The complete financial statement for fiscal year 2009 - 2010 is now available. Click here to download it as a pdf, or go to the Financial Statements page to view current and previous statements.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 4:07pm by .

Audiences are invited to get intimate with the action in the second instalment of a fresh take on Camus' 'Caligula.'

"As many countries in the world struggle to depose tyrants, a timely play is taking to a Bangkok stage, transporting audiences to ancient Rome to unseat an emperor who has just elected his horse as prime minister. Fancy a stab?" Read more in The Bangkok Post …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"'Heracles to Alexander the Great: Treasures from the Royal Capital of Macedon, a Hellenic Kingdom in the Age of Democracy' is as crowded with objects as its title is with ideas. The Ashmolean manages to cram in about 500 objects, discovered in the royal tombs and palaces of Aegae (modern-day Vergina in the north of Greece), most of which are being displayed for the very first time." Read more at The Wall Street Journal.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 2:11am by Information Architect.

"The transformation of humans into monsters or animals is a standard feature of two great genres: classical Greek and Roman myth and American comic books. As those of us know who spent our childhoods and teenaged years greedily hoarding the latter, such transformations are only occasionally effected by a mere change of costume. Batman, for instance (introduced in 1939), is an ordinary Homo sapiens who simply dons his bat-like hood and cape when he wants to battle evildoers; his extraordinary powers are the fruit of disciplined intellectual and physical training. More often—and more excitingly—the metamorphoses occur at the genetic level. The Incredible Hulk, who debuted in 1962, is a hypertrophied Hercules-like giant, the Mr. Hyde aspect of an otherwise mild-mannered scientist named Bruce Banner, created during a laboratory accident involving gamma rays. Wolverine, one of the X-men, who sports lupine traits following his transformations, belongs to a despised race of “mutants” with remarkable powers. (The comic book series, now reincarnated as a hugely popular film franchise, debuted in 1963.)" Read more at The New York Review of Books.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"Jeffrey Henderson, the University’s William Goodwin Aurelio Professor of Greek Language and Literature and a world-renowned classics scholar, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS)." Read the article at BU Today.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:21am by .

"Keeping the tradition of oral recitation alive in the age of technological storytelling, the University Classics Club hosted Homerathon, a 15-hour long recital of Homer’s The Odyssey." Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:35am by Information Architect.

"The University of Florida College of Fine Arts and Digital Worlds Institute has been awarded $50,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities." Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:30am by Information Architect.

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