Call for Student Nominations: Emory Summer Seminar in Material Culture

The Use of Art and Material Culture in Scholarship and Teaching:
Greek and Roman Art: an Introduction
A Seminar in Material Culture for Graduate Students in Classics and Ancient History
Directed by Dr Jasper Gaunt, Curator of Greek and Roman Art, Michael C. Carlos Museum,
Emory University
22 May – 30 June 2017
Emory University, Atlanta GA
Supported by generous grants from the Samuel H. Kress and Henry Luce Foundations, and Emory University
 
The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) invites doctoral programs in Classics or Ancient History to nominate a student to participate in a 6-week seminar that will introduce ten graduate students to the use of material culture in their scholarship and teaching. The aim of this seminar is to familiarize students with archaeological material that goes hand in hand with the historical and literary records, and how to incorporate such evidence into historical or philological research. This seminar will be the second of three with the same purpose but with different foci and at different institutions. The first took place at the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2016; the third will be held in 2018. Background. Despite new awareness of the scope of material evidence, and the ready availability of excellent images, all too often literary scholars treat images as decoration or illustration, while historians exploit the material record only gingerly. Probably more important than “literature” was the oral tradition, and the essential web of images that arose from it. Conversely, it has been wisely said of archaeology that it is a branch of ancient history.
 
This seminar offers students an opportunity to engage with the material record on a daily basis. Over the six weeks, every effort will be made to introduce the widest range of possibilities encountered in the archaeological record. Not only pottery and sculpture in bronze and marble will be considered, but also works in precious or exotic materials like ivory, gold, silver, amber, gems, glass, faience, and colored stones. Questions of facture and circulation will predominate: how these objects were made, by whom, for whom, why, and how to recognize them in the literary, historical and epigraphic record.
 
Resources and Faculty.
Participants will have access to the Museum’s collections of Egyptian, Nubian, Near Eastern, Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities, both those on view in the galleries and those in storage. The latter, which will be used daily for teaching, include notably rich holdings of fine pottery and gems. The Karen Mariea Madsen Parsons Conservation Laboratory, the Thalia N. Carlos Education Center and its staff are also participants, as are Emory faculty members. An extensive collection of plaster casts of ancient sculpture, and models of the sanctuaries at Delphi, Olympia and the Athenian Acropolis on long-term loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art are sprinkled among several buildings on campus. Further resources include the two principal campus libraries, the Robert W. Woodruff together with the Stuart A. Rose Manuscripts and Rare Books Library; and The Pitts Theology Library. Besides resources at Emory, the course will include the participation of Prof. Patricia Butz, Savannah College of Art and Design, on treasuries and their inscriptions; Prof. Mark Abbe, University of Georgia at Athens, on polychromy and color on ancient sculpture; and Prof. Peter Bing, University of Toronto, on the new Posidippos papyrus and hellenistic gems.
 
The course is co-ordinated by Jasper Gaunt, Curator of Greek and Roman Art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum. He is the joint editor with A.J. Clark of Essays in Honor of Dietrich von Bothmer (Amsterdam 2002), and has published widely on Greek vase-painting (including a volume of the Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: Great Britain 21: Harrow School, 2005), vessels in bronze and marble, metrical inscriptions on pottery, and reception studies.
 
Schedule.
The seminar is structured in broadly chronological terms. The importance of time allocated for students to absorb material in the galleries in their own ways cannot be overstated. Three two-hour classes are planned each week around an over-arching theme, outlined in the synopsis. Provision is also made each afternoon for further opportunities to handle original objects. Excursions to local artists’ workshops – such as glass-blowing, gold working and a bronze foundry – are planned on Friday afternoons, as is a day trip to see the Nashville Parthenon and its life-size reproduction of the chryselephantine cult statue.
 
Expectations of Students.
It is proposed that students will undertake small assignments on an on-going basis, intended primarily to foster familiarity with the world of objects. These will include informal mini-presentations on objects in the Carlos Museum’s collections, gallery talks, and some sketching. Over the course of the seminar, participants will work on a paper to be presented in the last week. The subject will be of the student’s choice, rising out of their research interests, but in conjunction with the course co-ordinator, who will allocate generous weekly time to meet with students individually.
 
Logistics and Funding.
Students selected for the seminar will be offered free accommodation at the Clairmont Campus of Emory University. A shuttle service operates between this campus and the main one where the seminar will be held. Both on campus and within walking distance of campus can be found a variety of shops, grocery stores and places to eat. Some public transportation, and taxi services like Uber, work well. In other words, the use of a car is not essential. The cost of car rental is greatly reduced if the airport is avoided. In addition, thanks to the generosity of the Samuel H. Kress and Henry Luce Foundations, the SCS will provide a stipend of up to $2,000 to cover the cost of travel to and from Atlanta, and modest out of pocket expenses. The SCS believes that these arrangements will offset many but by no means all of the costs of attendance at the seminar.
 
Nomination Process.
Each doctoral program may nominate only one student for the seminar. The focus of the student’s academic work should be classical languages, literatures, and/or history and not archaeology or other areas of material culture. Preference will be given to graduate students who are still taking coursework or in the early stages of writing their dissertation. Nominators should elicit from potential applicants a CV and a statement of the value that the student expects to derive from attending the seminar, choose one applicant to nominate, and forward the CV and statement to the SCS Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org), along with a brief endorsement. The student’s statement should be 500 to 700 words in length and should describe how the seminar would advance the applicant’s education and scholarly interests. The student him or herself should also email the Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org) with full name, mailing address, phone number.
A committee consisting of Dr Gaunt as chair and Professors Mary English (SCS Vice President for Education) and Donald Mastronarde (SCS VP for Publications and Research) will select participants from ten different academic institutions and a variety of countries of origin. Although many applicants from North America are expected, students from all countries are equally welcome. Reasonable fluency in English is the only requirement. Nominations by departments and emails from student nominees including their full contact information should be submitted electronically to xd@classicalstudies.org no later than 1 January 2017. The SCS will announce the decisions of the selection committee in early February 2017. Questions about the seminar program may be directed to Dr Gaunt at jgaunt@emory.edu or by telephone at 404 727 1146.
 
Synopsis of Curriculum
 
Each week has an over-arching (chronological) theme that is explored in a two-hour class on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 9.30–11.30. On Mondays through Thursdays, an afternoon session 2.30–4:00 is offered during which original works of art that are relevant to the topics discussed during the week are handled, and questions of manufacture discussed. On Friday afternoons, excursions are planned to studios of artists working in different media.
 
Week One: Monday May 22 – Friday May 26: Homer between Bronze Age and Geometric Greece
The Heroon at Lefkandi - Nestor’s Cup from Pithekoussai – Early artistic responses to the Epic Cycle
 
Week Two: Monday May 29 – Friday June 2: Archaic Greece: The symposium: how to throw a party in archaic Greece
Myths on vases, myths in “literature” - History and heroes - Herodotus and the Vix krater
 
Week Three: Monday June 5 – Friday June 9: Classical Greece
Inscriptions and the Parthenon Inventories – Polychromy on Greek sculpture - Textiles
Guest speakers: Dr Patricia Butz, Savannah College of Art and Design (inscriptions); Dr Mark Abbe, University of Georgia at Athens (polychromy)
 
Week Four: Monday June 12 – Friday June 16: Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World
Macedonian Tombs - The Posidippos Papyrus and gems – Ptolemaic Egypt
Guest speaker: Dr Peter Bing, University of Toronto (Posidippos)
 
Week Five: Monday June 19 – Friday June 23: The Roman World
Trimalchio’s dinner party - Portraiture - Glass
 
Week Six: Monday June 26 – Friday June 30: Pulling Things Together
Student reports
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(Photo: Michael C. Carlos Museum. Carlos Collection of Ancient Art, Atlanta, used with permission)

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Digital Publication in Mediterranean Archaeology
Current Practice and Common Goals

A conference organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and The Shelby White and Leon Levy Program for Archaeological Publications, in partnership with the Archaeological Institute of America
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

15 E. 84th Street
New York, NY
Friday, October 20, 2017
9am-5pm

Speaker list

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 12:56pm by Erik Shell.

“Deconstructing the Open Greek and Latin Project: The First Thousand Years of Greek”

An AIA-SCS Pre-Meeting Workshop, presented in coordination with the SCS 

January 3, 2018, 9:00 to 5:00, Tufts University, Medford, MA

Interested in open access, the digital humanities, or conducting digital scholarship in your research and/or teaching?  Aren't sure what these topics have to do with classics or archaeology, or even how to get started?  Then, please consider joining us next January 3 at the AIA-SCS pre-meeting workshop "Deconstructing the Open Greek and Latin Project"!

In this workshop, partners from the Perseus Digital Library, the Harvard Library and Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies, the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, the University of Leipzig, Mount Allison University, and the University of Virginia Library will come together to demonstrate research tools, explain how to involve students in digital scholarship, provide open data for hands-on exploration from the Open Greek and Latin Project, as well as create a growing and supportive open access community.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 9:23am by Erik Shell.

International Association for Presocratic Studies

Sixth Biennial Conference: 25-29 June 2018

Delphi, Greece: European Cultural Centre of Delphi

Chair of Organizing Committee: Richard McKirahan

The International Association for Presocratic Studies (IAPS, founded in 2008) announces its Sixth Biennial Conference. The meeting will take place at the European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece 25-29 June 2018.

IAPS understands “Presocratics” to be the figures for whom either fragments of their work or relevant testimonia are collected in Hermann Diels’ Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker (6th edn. 1951, edited by Walther Kranz). IAPS welcomes presentations on philosophical, philological, textual, doxographical, scientific, historical, literary and religious topics having to do with the Presocratics, on connections between Presocratic thought and other figures (e.g., the Sophists)and other areas of intellectual activity (e.g., mathematics, medicine or music), and on the reception of Presocratic thought in antiquity and later times.

IAPS welcomes participation from scholars at all stages of their careers, from graduate students to senior figures in the field.

To receive further information about the conference, please send a message with the title “IAPS 6” to Prof. Richard McKirahan <rmckirahan@pomona.edu>.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 09/12/2017 - 11:57am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers
Workshop: Language and Reality in Ancient Philosophy

Tuesday 16th January 2018, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Keynote speaker: David Ebrey (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin).

Ancient philosophers gave significant attention to the nature of language and its relation to reality. This workshop aims to stimulate scholarly exchange on the issue(s) and invites abstracts dealing with ancient philosophy of language, ancient metaphysics, and the relation between language and reality. Abstracts of up to 1000 words suitable for presentations of up to 40 minutes should be submitted by Saturday 21st October, 2017 to T.Nawar@rug.nl.

- The subject line of the email should read: 'SUBMISSION: Language and Reality in Ancient Philosophy (GRONINGEN)'.
- The abstract should be attached as a .PDF file.
- The abstract should be suitable for anonymous review.
- The author's name, affiliation, and email address should be specified in the email to which the abstract is attached, but not in the abstract itself.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:39pm by Erik Shell.

Deadlines Extended Because of Severe Weather Conditions

  • All paper ballots received by 5pm on Monday, September 18 will be counted in the elections.  Paper ballots do not have to be received on Friday, September 15.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/11/2017 - 10:08am by Erik Shell.

This article was originally published in Amphora 11.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

“Zero to Hero, in no time flat … Zero to Hero, just like that!” The Muses’ song from the Disney film Hercules could apply equally well to the sudden, spectacular rise of Hercules in pop entertainment of the late 1990s. Those proved lively years for the hero in American film and TV, spearheaded by the 1997 Disney animated movie and by television’s Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, starring Kevin Sorbo (1995-99). The two quickly spun off more TV series: Disney’s Hercules: The Animated Series (1998-99, 65 episodes of 30 minutes each) and Young Hercules (1998-99, 50 episodes also of 30 minutes each) starring Ryan Gosling.[1] Both spinoffs reimagined the mythological hero specifically for younger viewers and gave him unprecedented exposure in children’s weekday TV.[2]

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am by Angeline Chiu.

A memorial service for Albert Henrichs, Eliot Professor of Greek, will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, October 27th, 2017, in Memorial Church in Harvard Yard. All are welcome.

See map for details.

You can read our In memoriam for Albert here.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 1:04pm by Erik Shell.

Teachers of Classics have been impacted by hurricane Harvey and we are expecting reports from classicists in the Caribbean and continental US affected by Irma. 

ACL and SCS are launching a joint initiative that will help connect institutions in need with our members who are able to offer assistance.

If you are a teacher or faculty member at an institution whose academic programs have been interrupted, suspended, or impacted by the recent hurricanes, you can fill out the form linked below to request financial assistance that will accelerate the recovery of your classes and programs.

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

Once we have received your form, an ACL or SCS staff member will contact you to verify your identity and the nature of your request.  We will then publish verified requests on our websites and via our social media accounts so that individuals can reach out to institutions in need and offer direct financial help.  We feel that this is the quickest way of getting funds to the schools, colleges, and universities that need them.   

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 9:29am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

NEH is offering emergency grants and the opportunity for affected institutions to repurpose existing grants.

For more information, visit the NEH announcement page.

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

"author.net"

a transdisciplinary conference on distributed authorship

UCLA, October 5-7 2018.
Co-Organizers, Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2018

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 2:12pm by Erik Shell.

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