CFP: “Virgil and the Feminine” Vergilian Society’s Symposium Cumanum 2019

CFP: “Virgil and the Feminine” Vergilian Society’s Symposium Cumanum 2019

June 20-22, Villa Vergiliana, Cuma

Co-Directors: Elena Giusti (Warwick) and Victoria Rimell (Warwick)

The ‘Father of the West’ has not escaped scrutiny by feminist criticism. Since identifying the repressed female voice with Virgil’s subversive voice of loss (Perkell 1997, Nugent 1999),  scholars have turned from a practice of reading Virgilian women to an investigation of women reading Virgil (Desmond 1993, Cox 2011), from accounts of the patriarchal structures underpinning the Aeneid, and the poem’s performances of masculinity (Keith 2000), to readings that assert the centrality of the feminine in what is after all a history of reproduction (McAuley 2016, Rogerson 2017). Yet feminist approaches to Virgil still represent a tiny portion of contemporary scholarship, and Virgil – unlike Homer, or Ovid – has traditionally not been seen as fertile territory for feminist philosophy. This Symposium asks how ever-evolving contemporary feminisms might engage in new dialogues not just with the Aeneid, Eclogues and Georgics, but also with the Appendix Vergiliana, and aims to reassess, through Virgil, the role and potential of feminist modes of reading within classical philology. We welcome papers on any aspect of Virgil and the feminine/feminist criticisms and theories, and particularly encourage proposals by scholars interested in engaging across disciplines, and/or with any of the following topics:

abuse, affect, agency, animal, circularity, colour, desire, ecology, hysteria, identity, identity politics, ineffectiveness, intersubjectivity, lack, maternity, metaphor, metonym, nature, origin, pain, pleasure, the political, post-critique, pregnancy, queer, race, resistance, silence, song, teleology, time, touch, transferral, translation, virginity.

Confirmed Speakers: Sergio Casali (Roma Tor Vergata), Rita Degl’Innocenti Pierini (Firenze), Alex Dressler (Wisconsin-Madison), Erik Gunderson (Toronto), Alison Keith (Toronto), Helen Lovatt (Nottingham), Sebastian Matzner (KCL), Mairéad McAuley (UCL), Ellen Oliensis (Berkeley), Christine G. Perkell (Emory), Amy Richlin (UCLA), Sarah Spence (Georgia).

Papers will be 30 minutes with 15 minutes for discussion. Participants will arrive on Wednesday 19th June and the Symposium will include visits to Virgilian sites.

Anonymised abstracts of no more than 400 words in length should be sent to virgilandthefeminine@gmail.com by December 1, 2018.

NB. We are committed to make the event as inclusive as possible, so please do get in touch directly with the organisers if you have any enquiries regarding access or childcare, and for any further information:

Dr Elena Giusti E.Giusti@Warwick.ac.uk

Prof. Victoria Rimell V.Rimell@Warwick.ac.uk

Cited Works

Cox, F. (2011) Sibylline Sisters: Virgil’s Presence in Contemporary Women’s Writing, Oxford.

Desmond, M. (1993) Reading Dido: Gender, Textuality, and the Medieval Aeneid, Minneapolis.

Keith, A. (2000) Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic, Cambridge.

McAuley, M. (2016) Reproducing Rome: Motherhood in Virgil, Ovid, Seneca and Statius, Cambridge.

Nugent, G. S. (1999) ‘The Women of the Aeneid: Vanishing Bodies, Lingering Voices’ in C. G. Perkell (ed.) Reading Vergil’s Aeneid: An Interpretive Guide, Norman, 251-70.

Perkell, C. G. (1997) ‘The Lament of Juturna: Pathos and Interpretation in the Aeneid’, TAPA 127, 257-286.

Rogerson, A. (2017) Virgil’s Ascanius: Imagining the Future in the Aeneid, Cambridge.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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(From the National Humanities Alliance)

This afternoon, the House of Representatives will consider an amendment to the FY 2019 Interior Appropriations bill that would cut the proposed FY 2019 budget of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by 15% or nearly $23 million. This would be a setback to the increased funding that appropriations committees in the House and the Senate have supported to date.

The House will consider this amendment TODAY.

Please click here to urge your Member of Congress to oppose the amendment and encourage others to contact their Members of Congress as well!

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 07/17/2018 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.
Battle

(From the Dartmouth News blog)

SCS Outreach Prize winner Roberta Stewart, founder of book discussion groups for veterans, held a workshop recently with Classicists from other states hoping to start similar programs.

"The workshop represents a pilot to test the ability to develop a national network of co-facilitators who work pro bono to run groups nationwide."

You can read the full article here: https://news.dartmouth.edu/news/2018/07/classics-professors-book-group-v...

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(Photo: "Painted slab of tomb with 'Duel'" by Carlo Raso, public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/16/2018 - 9:54am by Erik Shell.

When you do study abroad trips with college or high school students, teaching happens on-site and draws upon the artifacts that surround you. We found this out firsthand while leading the first ever 3-week study abroad summer session in Greece from 21 May to 12 June for the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s Classics department this summer. I co-led the trip with classicist Thomas Rose. We both specialize in different areas, which really gave breadth to the teaching. Whereas Prof. Rose is an expert in Greco-Roman historiography and epigraphy, I specialize in poetry and translation while teaching at the University of Iowa. The itinerary was loosely inspired by the trips we both took to central and northern Greece as regular and student associate members of the American School for Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) in 2012 with our Mellon professor, Margaret M. Miles.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/12/2018 - 6:52pm by Adrienne K.H. Rose.

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/11/2018 - 11:33am by Erik Shell.
Ancient Greek football player balancing the ball. Part of a marble grave stele, found in Piraeus, 400-375 BC. Item (NAMA) 873 of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Image via Wikimedia under Public Domain.

“For as long as he lives, a man has no greater glory
than that which he wins with his own hands and feet”

οὐ μὲν γὰρ μεῖζον κλέος ἀνέρος, ὄφρα κεν ᾖσιν,
ἢ ὅ τι ποσσίν τε ῥέξῃ καὶ χερσὶν ἑῇσιν.
Homer, Odyssey 8.147-148

Salve, My ancient Roman friend—I know that much of this world of ours confuses you. Not if I had ten thousand mouths and as many years could I cover the histories of the centuries between your world and ours, nor could I catalog and explain airplanes, televisions, cell phones, and the droning chorus of wonders and horrors you see around you.

But maybe I can start with something which will help bridge the gulf between your world and ours—sport. Even though the younger Pliny mocked his contemporaries for their passion for horse races, passion for sport is an ancient inheritance.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 07/10/2018 - 1:22pm by Joel Perry Christensen.

CFP: “Virgil and the Feminine” Vergilian Society’s Symposium Cumanum 2019

June 20-22, Villa Vergiliana, Cuma

Co-Directors: Elena Giusti (Warwick) and Victoria Rimell (Warwick)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 07/09/2018 - 1:25pm by Erik Shell.

The Circus Maximus, the Colosseum, and the Roman Fora. What could be more Roman? These sites typically exemplify the power of the ancient Roman Empire and its lasting impact on the modern world. These are some of the definitive sites to visit on any trip to the eternal city, but how did these sites contribute to imperial propaganda and memory?

Lauren Donovan Ginsberg, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Cincinnati and Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and I recently organized and led a tour in Rome, entitled “Sites of Memory and Memories of Conflict: Imperial Rome, Jerusalem, and Nero,” asking just this question with the trustees of the American Academy in Rome. The Flavian dynasty, after the fall of Nero and the disastrous Year of the Four Emperors, built or added to many of modern day Rome’s most iconic buildings: the Colosseum, the Arch of Titus, the Circus Maximus (adding a triumphal arch at the eastern end), and the Templum Pacis (Temple of Peace).

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/05/2018 - 3:53pm by Catherine Bonesho.

Call for Papers

Classics and Global Humanities

Extended Deadline: 8th July, 2018

University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana

 11-12 October, 2018

Keynote Speaker

      Prof. Barbara Goff, University of Reading, Reading, UK

Studies have explored the cross-cultural engagement between Western civilisation and other cultures (Stephens and Vasunia 2010) as well as the legacy and reception of the Classics in the Arab world (Pormann 2015), India (Vasunia 2013), West Africa (Goff 2013; Goff and Simpson 2007) and recently, South Africa (Parker 2017). Classical reception studies thus continue to play a key role in bringing different parts of the world into greater dialogue with each other.

We invite abstracts for papers not only from Classics but also from other disciplines and sub-disciplines which explore ways in which reception studies is giving a new voice to classical research in West Africa, consider ways in which Classics in West Africa engages with the legacies of Egypt, Greece, and Rome or examine cross-cultural themes in both ancient and modern traditions. We also welcome papers which draw lessons from other parts of Africa and the world.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 07/03/2018 - 2:35pm by Helen Cullyer.

In spring 2018, students enrolled in the upper-level seminar “Antiquity Through a Lens” at Miami University engaged in critical study of the ways the classical world and, more specifically, ancient war narratives have been used in modern film and television to reflect on contemporary society and its conflicts.  Alongside study of ancient primary sources, students thus explored a range of concepts such as gender, class, race, religion, and even the meaning of victory itself in Troy (2004), 300 (2007), 300:  Rise of an Empire (2014), Spartacus (1960), Masada (1981), and Dragon Blade (2015).  It was the latter film, however, that provoked the most intriguing reactions from students in the course, since it forced them to view classical history for the first time through a distinctly non-Western lens. Please note that quotations in italics are taken with permission from comments students wrote when asked to reflect on what their encounter with Dragon Blade contributed to the course, CLS 361. 

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 06/27/2018 - 4:46pm by Denise Eileen McCoskey.

XVII International ARYS Colloquium

"DRESSING DIVINELY: clothed or naked deities and devotees"

V Centenario Residence (UNEX)
Jarandilla de la Vera, 13-14 December 2018

The development of a theoretical framework for the understanding of the links between religious identity and clothing depends both on a careful terminological selection and on a broad and holistic definition of the social aspects of wear. Through the use of trappings as an effective means of communication in social interaction, it is possible to activate identities based on and assigned by social structures, especially those built on kinship, economic, religious and political activities. At the same time, clothing represents for the individual an inexhaustible source of expressive creativity that can even break the “iconographic vocabulary” of a particular social group. Moreover, the specific types and properties of clothing that convey identity may change over time in response to economic, demographic, aesthetic and technological changes. A comprehensive definition of clothing includes both body modifications and complements, the properties of which have to be analyzed together with the sensory stimuli they may evoke.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/27/2018 - 11:02am by Erik Shell.

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