CFP: Affect, Intensity, Antiquity

CfP: Affect, Intensity, Antiquity (Online Conference)

Organizers: Chiara Graf and Adrian Gramps (St Andrews)

Confirmed Speakers: Aaron Kachuck (Trinity College, Cambridge / UCLouvain), Alex Purves (UCLA), Ben Radcliffe (Loyola Marymount), Mario Telò (UC Berkeley)

sed cur heu, Ligurine, cur
manat rara meas lacrima per genas?

Horace, Odes 4.1.33-34

Recent years have seen a collective turn in the study of Greco-Roman antiquity, and in the humanities and social sciences more widely, toward the matter of bodies and embodied experience. As a result, body-oriented themes such as the senses, emotion, and embodied cognition have moved away from the periphery of our disciplines and closer to centre stage. And yet we can’t claim to have closed the book on mind-body dualism for good. As Spinoza says in the Ethics, ‘no-one has yet determined what the body can do (etenim quid corpus possit, nemo hucusque determinavit, IIIp2s).’

Affect theory addresses this bodily unknown. ‘Affect’ names the potentiality of bodies to move and be moved in modes unintelligible to rationalist worldviews. Theorists of affect turn our sights away from familiar paths of enquiry and toward the para-rational zones of lived experience (sensations, disturbances, intensities, epiphenomena). Such reorientations awaken us to the otherwise ineffable dynamics that bind together political and social collectives, forge bonds between human and non-human entities, or galvanize and unite queer, racialized, and subaltern groups. The ‘affective turn’ has also birthed new methodologies, such as post-critique and reparative reading, by centring emotive forms of engagement with texts and media. Whether taken as an object of enquiry or as a catalyst of methodological innovation, affect destabilizes the hierarchies that order foundational narratives (‘Western’, ‘classical’, and otherwise) of the body and its powers.

The aim of this conference is to explore the potential and futures of affect theory in any field of study relating to Classics and the ancient Mediterranean world. It is our hope and conviction that these are many. The epigraph above offers one of many possible starting points: Horace asking the beautiful Ligurinus why he feels a tear of desire wetting his cheek. Affect theory recognizes such an aporetic ‘why’ as a space of radical uncertainty and potential. We invite your interventions into this space from all corners of Classics.

Potential areas of focus might include:

  • The affects associated with subaltern populations, such as women, enslaved people, and racialized groups, in ancient art and literature
  • Affective encounters with the nonhuman and more-than-human world, as expressed in e.g. visual art, travel writing, or scientific texts
  • Sensation and embodied experience in ancient medicine
  • Sensory and affective experiences in ancient ritual and religion
  • Reconsiderations (in light of affect theory) of cognitivist accounts of the emotions
  • Challenges to concepts of the ancient ‘subject’ as a site of rational agency and control
  • Interpretations of ancient texts and artefacts influenced by postcritique, reparative reading, or other methodologies generated by the affective turn
  • The affects generated by antiquity itself, in receptions of Classical art, thought, and literature (or, how antiquity ‘feels’)
  • The affective dimension of Classics pedagogy, including the experience of online learning in the age of Covid-19

The conference will be conducted entirely online through Microsoft Teams on 20-22 August 2021. Submissions for 30-minute presentations are invited from researchers at any career stage. Please submit an abstract of 300-500 words for consideration to Dr Adrian Gramps at adkg1@st-andrews.ac.uk by 31 May 2021.

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TLL Fellowship 2021-2022 Application Cycle

Supported by a Generous Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:16pm by Erik Shell.

Call for papers: Human Crime and Divine Punishment in Ancient Didactic poetry

Trinity College Dublin, 10-11 March 2022

As has long been observed, ancient Didactic poetry is not merely a vehicle to convey technical information and instruction. Justice and the place of humanity in the cosmos are already central concerns of Hesiod’s Works and Days, which attributes the harsh realities of agricultural life to a history of transgression, moral decline, and punishment. Similar questions continue to fascinate his didactic successors, who not only develop Hesiodic material, for instance in the departure of Justice from Earth in Aratus’ Phaenomena, but also explore other manifestations of divine intervention, such as through myths of metamorphosis and catasterism. In some didactic poems, such as Virgil’s Georgics or Oppian’s Halieutica, the pursuit of their subject matter itself poses the risk of violating ethical norms or overstepping mortal boundaries.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:09pm by Erik Shell.

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:03pm by Erik Shell.

City Lit, one of London’s largest adult education colleges, and the British Museum are organising Classics Week.

Classics Week runs from 21-25 June 2021 and takes inspiration from the British Museum’s current exhibition Nero: the man behind the myth (27 May- 24 Oct).  Join us for a programme of online talks, discussions, and taster courses exploring the subject of power in ancient Rome.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:40pm by Erik Shell.
A page from Martin Kraus’ Aethiopica Epitome processed using LatinOCR within VietOCR. It handles the opening chapter summary well but is only 88% accurate with the italicized body text.

LatinOCR and Rescribe are related optical character recognition (OCR) tools that substantially accelerate the conversion of scanned Latin to Unicode text and, in the case of Rescribe, to searchable PDF format. Both are pleasant to use but require a degree of comfort with command-line tools, at least to get up and running.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:34pm by .
The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, the Network for the Study of the Archaic and Classical Greek Song, and CHS Greece invite you to attend Performing Texts, an international virtual conference to be held from June 30 through July 4, 2021.
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 9:29am by Erik Shell.

(Originally posted here)

Seattle, Washington - Rochelle Elizabeth Snee, born December 6, 1947, in Trenton, NJ, passed away at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, WA on Sunday, September 6, 2020.

Rochelle was a 1965 graduate of Dulaney High School in Lutherville - Timonium, MD. She earned her B.A. degree at the University of Maryland at College Park, majoring in Classical Studies under Wilhelmina Jashemski. She attended the University of Washington, where she earned both an M.A. and a PhD in Classics with a concentration in the Byzantine Period.

As a Classics scholar, Rochelle had many opportunities for both study and travel. She had fellowships at Colby College in Waterville, ME, to work with fellow classicists Dorothy Koonce and Peter Westervelt; and in Washington, D.C., she continued her study of Byzantium with fellowships at both Dumbarton Oaks and Catholic University. In Rome she translated ancient Greek documents in the Vatican Library; in Jerusalem she read ancient manuscripts available only to those with special permission; in Istanbul she researched for an article on Gregory Nazianzen's Anastasia Church. She was on the faculty of Pacific Lutheran University, where she taught ancient Greek, Latin, and imbued students with a knowledge of ancient history.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 06/09/2021 - 2:24pm by Erik Shell.
Children playing ball games, 2nd century AD. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

“Think of the Children! The Reception of the Ancient World in Children’s Media” was the Women’s Classical Caucus panel at the most recent AIA/SCS meeting. We (Melissa Funke and Victoria Austen, co-organizers) conceived of this panel as a far-reaching conversation about how children have historically engaged with ancient Greece and Rome and how they continue to do so today. In choosing the papers for this panel, we had two primary concerns in mind: to think about how various media use ancient Greek and Roman material for education and play alike, and to use girlhood as a lens to reconsider reception in those media. While more traditional forms of literature, such as storybooks and poetry, were featured as an important aspect of this conversation, the presenters also addressed these issues in primary textbooks, video games, and web comics.

“Nationalism and Imperialism in Futures Past: Classical Reception in Louisa Capper's A Poetical History of England: Written for the Use of Young Ladies Educated at Rothbury-House School (1810),” by Kathryn H. Stutz

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/07/2021 - 8:30am by .

Karl-Christ-Prize for Ancient History

Laureate 2021: Prof. Dr. Klaus Hallof

(Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

The Karl-Christ-Prize, endowed with 25,000 euros and dedicated to the memory of Karl Christ, who held the Chair of Ancient History at the University of Marburg from 1965 to 1988, will be awarded for the fifth time in 2021. The prize is awarded every two years for outstanding academic achievements in the field of ancient history and neighbouring disciplines as well as the history of humanities and classical reception. It is presented alternately at the universities of Frankfurt a.M. and Bern, where Karl Christ's scholarship is being continued.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:49pm by Erik Shell.

2022 Comparative Literature Conference

University of South Carolina

February 10th -13th, 2022

Truth in the Late Foucault

Keynote Speakers

Sandra Boehringer (Université de Strasbourg)

Alex Dressler (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Edward McGushin (Stonehill College)

Special Event: “Foucault: A Polemical Dialogue”

David Greven (University of South Carolina) and Marc Démont (Centre College)

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:46pm by Erik Shell.

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