CFP: CAAS 2020 Annual Meeting

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States
Call for Papers: 2020 Annual Meeting, October 8-10, 2020

Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, DE

We invite individual and group proposals on all aspects of the classical world and classical reception, and on new strategies and resources for improved teaching.  Especially welcome are presentations that aim at maximum audience participation and integrate the concerns of K-12 and college faculty, that consider ways of communicating about ancient Greece and Rome beyond our discipline and profession, and that reflect on the past, present, and future of classical studies in the CAAS region.

The 2020 Clack Lecture will be delivered by Dr. Jinyu Liu, Professor of Classical Studies at DePauw University and Principal Investigator of “Translating the Complete Corpus of Ovid’s Poetry into Chinese with Commentaries“, a multi-year project sponsored by a National Social Science Fund of China (2015-2020).  Dr. Liu’s lecture title is “From Rome to China: Translation, (Western) Classics, and Comparative Antiquity.”  She describes her topic as follows:  “In this lecture, I will foreground translation (i.e. the act itself) of Classical texts as inherently a comparative project as well as the foundational importance of translation to comparative studies. In a joint manifesto, Fritz-Heiner Mutschler and Walter Scheidel have emphasized the “disruptive” potential of comparative history as one of the major benefits of comparative studies [Fritz-Heiner Mutschler and Walter Scheidel, “The Benefits of Comparison: A Call for the Comparative Study of Ancient Civilizations,” Journal of Ancient Civilizations 32 (2017), 113]. In the same vein, I underscore translation as a mechanism to engineer, facilitate, and complicate comparative antiquity.”

We will offer an undergraduate research session of presentations developed from outstanding term papers, senior theses or other scholarly projects, to be organized in conjunction with Eta Sigma Phi, the national honor society for classical studies.

All submitters of proposals for the meeting must be current members of CAAS. Participants in the 2020 Annual Meeting must be members when they submit proposals and must renew their memberships for 2020-2021 (the membership year is September 1-August 31).  All submitters of proposals that are accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the 2020 meeting are expected to attend and deliver their presentations.  They are required to send a full draft of their presentations to their presider(s) by the end of September.  Submitters of accepted proposals who are unable to attend should arrange to have their presentations delivered by another CAAS member.

All proposals must be submitted electronically here.

Panel and Workshop Proposals may be 1 ½ or 2 hours in length, depending on the number of speakers. Submissions must be uploaded as a single PDF (.pdf) or Word 97-2010 (.doc/docx) file of no more than 700 words and must include:

  • a description of the proposed panel or workshop and brief abstracts of the individual presentations. Each abstract of an individual presentation must be accompanied by a bibliography or a list of resources consulted of up to five items (not included in the word limit). The proposal must clearly indicate the thesis and original contribution made by the panel or workshop and situate this contribution in a larger scholarly context (see Writing an Abstract for Professional Presentation). The proposal must be anonymous. The names of the organizer and presenters must not appear anywhere in this file except when citing a publication by the organizer or presenters.Those abstracts which include the names and/or institutional affiliations of their organizers and presenters will not be considered.
  • title of the session and titles of each individual presentation.
  • specific audio-visual needs for the session. CAAS is able to supply only a screen and a digital light projector (those bringing MACs will need to bring their special adapter plug to connect to the projector).  DVDs can be played only from your laptop.  Be advised that sound played from a laptop without special speakers may not be audible in the room.

Deadline for panel and workshop proposals is March 9, 2020.

Individual Proposals must be no more than 15 minutes in length. Each author must not submit more than one abstract.  Submissions must be uploaded as a single PDF (.pdf) OR Word 97-2010 (.doc/docx) file of no more than 300 words and must include:

  • clearly indicated thesis and original contribution(s) made by your presentation, situating it in a larger scholarly context (see Writing an Abstract for Professional Presentation). Submissions must be accompanied by a bibliography or a list of resources consulted of up to five items (not included in the word limit). The proposal must be anonymous. The author’s name should not appear anywhere in this file except when citing a publication by the author. Those abstracts which include the names and/or institutional affiliations of their authors will not be considered.  
  • specific audio-visual needs for your presentation. CAAS is able to supply only a screen and a digital light projector (those bringing MACs will need to bring their special adapter plug to connect to the projector).  DVDs can be played only from your laptop.  Be advised that sound played from a laptop without special speakers may not be audible in the room.
  • If you are an undergraduate, please indicate this by selecting “undergraduate paper” as the submission type, so that undergraduate submissions can be read separately, and in relation to one another.

Deadline for individual proposals is March 9, 2020.

For further information, please contact CAAS Program Coordinator Maria S. Marsilio (marsilio@sju.edu). Please contact Webmaster Jennifer Ranck (jennifer.ranck@gmail.com) if you experience difficulties with the online forms.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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