CFP: Failure and Flaws in Classical Antiquity

CFP: Failure and Flaws in Classical Antiquity
January 25-26, 2019, UCLA
 
In the poem “Failing and Flying”, Jack Gilbert appeals to classical imagery to reconfigure the notion of failure: “Icarus was not failing as he fell,” the poem concludes, “but only coming to the end of his triumph.” Throughout antiquity, numerous forms of literary and material culture, as well as forms of reception, have grappled with real or imagined failure and flaws. The concept of failure is especially pressing because modern society persistently looks back to antiquity’s failures in order to understand its own. By interrogating the use and meaning of failure both within classical works and in discussions about canon, genre, and reception, we aim to explore the interpretive value of failure for our understanding of the classical world.
 
The graduate students of the Department of Classics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) are pleased to announce the forthcoming graduate conference “Failure and Flaws in Classical Antiquity”, which will take place January 25-26, 2019 at UCLA. The conference will feature a keynote address by Emily Greenwood (Professor of Classics, Yale University) on “Failure and Attribution: The Ethics and Politics of Reading Classical Failure.” Graduate students in Classics and related fields are welcome to submit proposals for papers on topics including, but not limited to, the following themes:
 
  • Intentional failure: failure as a deliberate philosophical, rhetorical, or artistic strategy.
  • Consciousness of potential failure in antiquity: the anxiety of ancient authors and artists about living up to their predecessors.
  • Literary treatments of failure: thwarted love, flawed characters, fruitless wanderings.
  • Failures of language and perception.
  • Failures of genre: texts or objects considered flawed or “less than” examples of a genre.
  • Modern and ancient reinterpretations of canonical texts or material objects as failing in some way.
  • Misapplications or appropriations of antiquity throughout history.
     
Please submit abstracts of approximately 300 words as a .pdf to gradconference2019@gmail.com by no later than October 15th, 2018. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length. Please include your name and contact details in the submission email but do not include any identifying markers (name, affiliation) in the abstract itself. Applicants will be notified of their status approximately a month after the deadline. Further information will be available at gradconference2019.wordpress.com.
 
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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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TLL Fellowship 2021-2022 Application Cycle

Supported by a Generous Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:16pm by Erik Shell.

Call for papers: Human Crime and Divine Punishment in Ancient Didactic poetry

Trinity College Dublin, 10-11 March 2022

As has long been observed, ancient Didactic poetry is not merely a vehicle to convey technical information and instruction. Justice and the place of humanity in the cosmos are already central concerns of Hesiod’s Works and Days, which attributes the harsh realities of agricultural life to a history of transgression, moral decline, and punishment. Similar questions continue to fascinate his didactic successors, who not only develop Hesiodic material, for instance in the departure of Justice from Earth in Aratus’ Phaenomena, but also explore other manifestations of divine intervention, such as through myths of metamorphosis and catasterism. In some didactic poems, such as Virgil’s Georgics or Oppian’s Halieutica, the pursuit of their subject matter itself poses the risk of violating ethical norms or overstepping mortal boundaries.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:09pm by Erik Shell.

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:03pm by Erik Shell.

City Lit, one of London’s largest adult education colleges, and the British Museum are organising Classics Week.

Classics Week runs from 21-25 June 2021 and takes inspiration from the British Museum’s current exhibition Nero: the man behind the myth (27 May- 24 Oct).  Join us for a programme of online talks, discussions, and taster courses exploring the subject of power in ancient Rome.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:40pm by Erik Shell.
A page from Martin Kraus’ Aethiopica Epitome processed using LatinOCR within VietOCR. It handles the opening chapter summary well but is only 88% accurate with the italicized body text.

LatinOCR and Rescribe are related optical character recognition (OCR) tools that substantially accelerate the conversion of scanned Latin to Unicode text and, in the case of Rescribe, to searchable PDF format. Both are pleasant to use but require a degree of comfort with command-line tools, at least to get up and running.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:34pm by .
The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, the Network for the Study of the Archaic and Classical Greek Song, and CHS Greece invite you to attend Performing Texts, an international virtual conference to be held from June 30 through July 4, 2021.
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 9:29am by Erik Shell.

(Originally posted here)

Seattle, Washington - Rochelle Elizabeth Snee, born December 6, 1947, in Trenton, NJ, passed away at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, WA on Sunday, September 6, 2020.

Rochelle was a 1965 graduate of Dulaney High School in Lutherville - Timonium, MD. She earned her B.A. degree at the University of Maryland at College Park, majoring in Classical Studies under Wilhelmina Jashemski. She attended the University of Washington, where she earned both an M.A. and a PhD in Classics with a concentration in the Byzantine Period.

As a Classics scholar, Rochelle had many opportunities for both study and travel. She had fellowships at Colby College in Waterville, ME, to work with fellow classicists Dorothy Koonce and Peter Westervelt; and in Washington, D.C., she continued her study of Byzantium with fellowships at both Dumbarton Oaks and Catholic University. In Rome she translated ancient Greek documents in the Vatican Library; in Jerusalem she read ancient manuscripts available only to those with special permission; in Istanbul she researched for an article on Gregory Nazianzen's Anastasia Church. She was on the faculty of Pacific Lutheran University, where she taught ancient Greek, Latin, and imbued students with a knowledge of ancient history.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 06/09/2021 - 2:24pm by Erik Shell.
Children playing ball games, 2nd century AD. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

“Think of the Children! The Reception of the Ancient World in Children’s Media” was the Women’s Classical Caucus panel at the most recent AIA/SCS meeting. We (Melissa Funke and Victoria Austen, co-organizers) conceived of this panel as a far-reaching conversation about how children have historically engaged with ancient Greece and Rome and how they continue to do so today. In choosing the papers for this panel, we had two primary concerns in mind: to think about how various media use ancient Greek and Roman material for education and play alike, and to use girlhood as a lens to reconsider reception in those media. While more traditional forms of literature, such as storybooks and poetry, were featured as an important aspect of this conversation, the presenters also addressed these issues in primary textbooks, video games, and web comics.

“Nationalism and Imperialism in Futures Past: Classical Reception in Louisa Capper's A Poetical History of England: Written for the Use of Young Ladies Educated at Rothbury-House School (1810),” by Kathryn H. Stutz

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/07/2021 - 8:30am by .

Karl-Christ-Prize for Ancient History

Laureate 2021: Prof. Dr. Klaus Hallof

(Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

The Karl-Christ-Prize, endowed with 25,000 euros and dedicated to the memory of Karl Christ, who held the Chair of Ancient History at the University of Marburg from 1965 to 1988, will be awarded for the fifth time in 2021. The prize is awarded every two years for outstanding academic achievements in the field of ancient history and neighbouring disciplines as well as the history of humanities and classical reception. It is presented alternately at the universities of Frankfurt a.M. and Bern, where Karl Christ's scholarship is being continued.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:49pm by Erik Shell.

2022 Comparative Literature Conference

University of South Carolina

February 10th -13th, 2022

Truth in the Late Foucault

Keynote Speakers

Sandra Boehringer (Université de Strasbourg)

Alex Dressler (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Edward McGushin (Stonehill College)

Special Event: “Foucault: A Polemical Dialogue”

David Greven (University of South Carolina) and Marc Démont (Centre College)

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:46pm by Erik Shell.

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