CFP: Feminism & Classics 2020 - body/language

Feminism & Classics 2020: body/language
 
FemClas 2020, the eighth quadrennial conference of its kind, takes place on May 21–24, 2020, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the invitation of the Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy.  The conference theme is "body/language," broadly construed, and papers on all topics related to feminism, Classics, Philosophy, and related themes are welcome.
 
This conference focuses on the use of the body and/or language to gain, lose, contest, or express power and agency in the ancient Mediterranean world.  Bodies and words, at both the physical and the conceptual levels, can exert disproportionate, oppositional, or complementary forces.  Both have the power to transform their surrounding environments significantly.  Yet there is a problematic dichotomy between body/physicality and language/reason, a problem long noted by philosophers, literary theorists, and social historians.  FemClas 2020 seeks to contest, blur, and even eradicate these boundaries through papers, panels, and other programming that promotes interdisciplinary exploration of the ancient world.
 
We invite contributions that use the lens of bodies, languages, or their intersections to address any aspect of the ancient world, modern encounters with ancient cultures, or the academic practices of Classics, Philosophy, and related fields.  Participants might explore how voices engender movement(s) and transform bodies, or how movement(s) in turn can stimulate recognition of unheard or otherwise suppressed voices and lead to change.  These can be voices and movements within the ancient world, within the university, or within our modern disciplines.  The study of agency, expressed through the problematic body/language dichotomy, addresses critical questions not only in scholarly work but also in the governance, makeup, and power dynamics of our fields, currently and historically.  Now, perhaps more than ever, is a critical time for us to consider ourselves as students of bodies past and present, as embodied scholars, and to interrogate the repercussions of body normativity -- from race and gender to neurodiversity, dis/ability, and body types -- on our work and our profession.
 
All submissions are due September 1, 2019.  FemClas 2020 welcomes individual papers, organized panels, workshops, roundtables, posters, author-meets-critic sessions, and other, innovative forms of programming.  We encourage submissions from the widest possible range of perspectives, addressing all areas of the ancient world and its legacies.  We also welcome proposals especially from related interest groups (such as Mountaintop, Eos Africana, the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus, MRECC, Classics & Social Justice, the Lambda Classical Caucus, the Women’s Classical Caucus, and EuGeSta) and from allied disciplines (e.g., English, comparative literature, media studies, environmental humanities, animal studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).  
 
Proposals should aim for an abstract of approximately 300 words (not counting works cited), and should be anonymous where possible.  To submit a proposal for an individual paper or poster, visit:
 
To submit a proposal for any other type of session, visit:
 
We are enthusiastic about developing a program that will work toward making our intellectual community more welcoming and accessible to all. For this reason, we invite with special emphasis proposals for workshops, roundtables, and the like (creative formats welcome!) that will offer practical training about e.g. implicit bias, sexual harassment, racism, accessibility, developing diversity statements, and so forth.
 
The organizers (T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Emily Austin) and the Program Committee of FemClas 2020 are committed to an inclusive, welcoming, and accommodating conference.  Submissions from graduate students, contingent and underemployed faculty, and independent scholars are especially welcome.  Submissions from undergraduate students are also welcome and will be considered separately for a dedicated panel.  We will be able to provide reduced conference fees and some travel assistance for attendance by participants who cannot obtain institutional support.
 
As part of submission, registration, and attendance at the conference, we will ask you to agree to our conference Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy, which prohibits harassment and discrimination of any kind.  A trained, experienced Anti-Harassment Administrator who is not a member of the discipline will receive and address or refer complaints about harassment and violations of the code of conduct.  The Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy is available here:
 
FemClas 2020 will take place partially on the downtown campus of Wake Forest University and partially at a nearby hotel.  Each site is fully accessible for all forms of mobility.  At each site there will be all-gender bathrooms, a lactation room, a quiet room, and on-site childcare (which we hope to offer at no extra cost).
 
Some states prohibit using state funds to travel to North Carolina, despite the partial repeal of NC HB-2.  Wake Forest University, as a private institution, is not subject to NC state legislative regulations of public universities, and Wake Forest has a non-discrimination policy inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression:
 
Please contact T. H. M. Gellar-Goad at thmgg@wfu.edu with questions.
 
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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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12th Annnual West Coast Plato Workshop

San Diego State University, 24-26 May

Friday (May 24)

3-4:30pm: Drinks and Refreshments

5-6:30pm: Keynote Public Lecture: Deborah Modrak (University of Rochester)

7-9pm: Dinner for Speakers, Commentators, and Chairs


Saturday (May 25)

9-9:30am: Coffee and Refreshments

9:30-10:45: Invited Speaker: Adam Beresford (University of Massachusetts at Boston)

Commentator: Jan Szaif (University of California at Davis)

11-12:10pm: Oksana Maksymchuk (University of Arkansas): An Anthropological Defense of the Measure Doctrine in the Protagoras

Commentator: Grant Dowling (Stanford University)

12:15-1:30pm: Lunch and Business Meeting

1:45-2:55: Marta Jimenez (Emory University): Protagoras and Socrates on Courage and Knowledge

Commentator: Ryan Drake (Fairfield University)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 9:35am by Erik Shell.

(Republished from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

In a career that lasted over 70 years, Jerry Clack wore many different hats.

From a youthful stint at the Swedish Legation in Washington and four years with UNESCO to public relations and accounting positions with AAA, Coca-Cola and the American Heart Association, he went on to assume directorship of Allegheny County’s chapter of The March of Dimes in 1953. His 15-year tenure with March of Dimes saw the development of two anti-polio vaccines, that of Jonas Salk at University of Pittsburgh and the oral vaccine of Albert Sabin.

Mr. Clack died Monday at Shadyside Hospital due to heart failure.

The son of Mildred Taylor Van Dyke of Pittsburgh and Christopher Thrower Clack of Boydton, Virginia, Mr. Clack was born in New York City on July 22, 1926. Because his father was a foreign representative of the Pittsburgh-based Blaw-Knox Company, he spent his early years in Europe, mostly in London and Dusseldorf. After his father’s death, he returned with his mother to Pittsburgh, attending the Fulton School and Peabody High School.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 8:43am by Erik Shell.

by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Christopher B. Polt

In this post, Profs. Gellar-Goad and Polt clarify their position in the debate over holding the annual CAMWS meeting at BYU for the 2023 annual meeting and why they view BYU as an unsafe conference site for LGTBQ+ classicists.

On Saturday, April 20, the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS) rescinded its earlier decision to hold part of its annual meeting on the campus of Brigham Young University (BYU) during its 2023 conference in Provo, Utah.

CAMWS leadership had selected Brigham Young University (BYU) to host its 2023 annual meeting — despite the fact that serious concerns about the safety and inclusion of its LGBTQ+ members at such a conference site were voiced before and after that decision was made — and dismissed repeated requests for compromise that would safeguard LGBTQ+ colleagues. Over the last 18 months we tried to work with, and within the structure of, CAMWS to address this issue quietly and amicably. We did so in an attempt to save everyone a great deal of anguish and to avoid unnecessary negative attention for the Classicists at BYU. Ultimately, however, we felt compelled to call on CAMWS publicly to change course, and CAMWS leadership did so only in the face of significant public pressure by Classicists across the world.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 8:13am by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad.
Eta Sigma Phi students, Callie Todhunter, Noah Andrys, and Myles Young, staff the Homerathon booth at the University of Iowa

For a number of years, our local Eta Sigma Phi chapter has been organizing public readings of the sorts of things classicists cut their teeth on – or at least feel like we do: Homer’s epics, Vergil, Ovid. These have always been a wonderful experience for our department – everyone involved loves the opportunity to read and hear these works as they were meant. We decided that this year we wanted to reach a different and larger audience than before, inspired by the outreach of, among others, Bob Cargill and the University of Nebraska's Homerathon tradition (which the SCS Blog covered last year). Literature and art flourish in Iowa City, a UNESCO City of Literature, which is also the home of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and many artists. Why not ask them, as well as people in our community, to join us? One of our guiding principles was that Homer belongs to everyone, not just classicists.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 04/18/2019 - 10:56pm by .

"Writing Ancient and Medieval Same-Sex Desire: Goals, Methods, Challenges"
June 30-July 2, 2020
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020 at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/17/2019 - 9:03am by Erik Shell.

Reframing Wisdom Literature. Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts

King's College London, 30-31 May 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Prof Dimitri Gutas, Yale University

Registration is now open for the postgraduate conference "Reframing Wisdom Literature. Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts." The programme is included below and you can read more about our aims and about the line up here: https://hcommons.org/app/uploads/sites/1001234/2019/04/RWL-booklet.pdf

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 04/16/2019 - 9:34am by Erik Shell.

Please note that the deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

You can submit your abstract via our online Program Submission System  

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/15/2019 - 8:37am by Erik Shell.

'Addressing the Divide' is a new column that looks at the ways in which the modern field of Classics was constructed and then explores ways to identify, modify, or simply abolish the lines between fields in order to embrace broader ideas of what Classics was, is, and could be. This month, Sarah Bond discusses the partition between Biblical Studies and the field of Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 04/13/2019 - 6:56am by Sarah Bond.

The index and all the published volumes of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (A–M, O–P, and Onomasticon C–D) are now available as open access pdfs from the Bavarian Academy:

http://www.thesaurus.badw.de/tll-digital/tll-open-access.html

Please note that the pdfs may currently be slow to load.


Picture: "Library of the Thesaurus linguae latinae" by N. P. Holmes, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

 
 

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Fri, 04/12/2019 - 11:29am by Helen Cullyer.
POWER AND KNOWLEDGE
in Plato and the Platonic Tradition
22-24 May, Uppsala (Sweden)

Registration is now open for the international symposium ‘Power & Knowledge in Plato and the Platonic Tradition', which will take place at the department of philosophy at Uppsala University on the 22nd-24th of May 2019. The program is included below. For more information about the symposium and what we hope to achieve, see: http://rationalselfgovernment.se/power-and-knowledge/.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 12:10pm by Erik Shell.

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In Memoriam
(Republished from the
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
12th Annnual West Coast Plato Workshop
Calls for Papers
"Writing Ancient and Medieval Same-Sex Desire: Goals, Methods, Challe
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
Reframing Wisdom Literature.

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